Almost the Ultimate in ‘Not Interested’ Segmentation

If data is the fuel that is powering today’s marketing engine, Google has discovered a real gusher. Google, or any other AI-aided advertising sales effort, can add these datasets to already copious databases and use them as the almost ultimate tool to segment advertising messages to people most likely to be interested in them and to avoid sending ads in specific categories to those people who have signaled they are “not interested.”

annoying ads

I couldn’t quite believe my eyes.

Peter J. Rosenwald illustration one
Credit: Peter J. Rosenwald

That “i” with a circle around it and the accompanying “X” may have been there before, but I must never have noticed. They certainly didn’t leap off the page at me (that’s why I added the arrow) and would have had a hard time competing for attention with those cool 3D T-shirts.

Credit: Peter J. Rosenwald

But there they were, hiding in the upper right hand corner of lots of ads, placed every five paragraphs or so by those lovable folks at Google, certainly intended to interrupt my reading of every salacious breaking news story about the White House and porn star Stormy Daniels (upright in real life, Ms. Stephanie Clifford).

Seduced away from learning the latest secrets of how to earn $130,000 for allegedly having a soft porn one-nighter with a presidential candidate who, between rallies imploring the U.S. electorate to make America great again, found time for a little R & R, I became intrigued by those mysterious letters and moved my cursor to discover what they were telling me.

Credit: Peter J. Rosenwald

OK as far as it went, but by now in a state of aroused curiosity about the encircled “i” and accompanying “X,” I wanted to know more. Click on the encircled “i” and it takes you to AdSense, a website providing everything you ever wanted to know but perhaps never thought to ask, about Google’s targeted advertising and data protection policies.

Click on the “X” and here is what you get.

Credit: Peter J. Rosenwald

Google has now neatly positioned me to click on “Stop seeing this ad” or “Ads by Google,” un-highlighted and again accompanied by the encircled “i.” Addicted as I am to Sherlock Holmes, I felt compelled to move ahead and to click the “Stop” button.

But before I did, I began wondering; what’s in this for Google other than having delivered a possibly unwanted ad, then creating a nice warm “feel good” atmosphere. It’s rather like the guest who tracks mud into your living room, and then apologizes and promises to try not to do it again.

Credit: Peter J. Rosenwald

Now I get it.

It’s a brilliantly laid back survey generating invaluable data about;

  • Those “Not interested in this ad,” those on whom promotion money for this category should not be wasted.

The first time I clicked on “Not interested,” I was taken to a section of the site which showed me a wide range of interest categories and asked me to eliminate those for which I had no interest. As I’d indicate one, it would go away and another one would pop up in what became an endless five-minute project. Wanting to show it here, I tried again to find it, but Google had obviously gotten what it wanted from me and it mysteriously disappeared.

  • Those who didn’t have anything against the specific category but had seen it “multiple” times (too many), that number informing Google to limit the ad frequency for this person;
  • Those who consider the ad “inappropriate,” a clear signal to Google to send only “Jello’” ads here; no “Tamale flavored hot, spicy yogurt.”
  • When I clicked on “Ad-covered content,” I received a message that the ad had been ‘closed’ by Google, nothing else that might have explained what “Ad-covered content” might have meant.

If data is the fuel that is powering today’s marketing engine, Google has discovered a real gusher. Google, or any other AI-aided advertising sales effort, can add these datasets to already copious databases and use them as the almost ultimate tool to segment advertising messages to people most likely to be interested in them and to avoid sending ads in specific categories to those people who have signaled they are “not interested.”

It’s a win, win. For Google, because it should be a very sexy addition to its advertising sales platform. For advertisers, who must applaud a new ability not to spend the marketing budget talking to people who do not wish to hear their message.

Author: Peter J. Rosenwald

Peter J. Rosenwald is an expat American living and working in Brazil; founder and first CEO of Wunderman Worldwide, International Division of Wunderman agency) and first chairman of Saatchi & Saatchi Direct Worldwide; strategist and senior executive in charge of building subscription and data-driven marketing for Editora Abril, Latin America's leading magazine publisher; founder of Consult Partners, active strategic marketing consultancy working in Brazil, U.S. and U.K. International keynote speaker on data-driven marketing and author of "Accountable Marketing" (Thomson), "Profiting From the Magic of Marketing Metrics" (Direct Marketing IQ), and "GringoView" blog author for Brazilian Huffington Post. With an international perspective, my blog's purpose is to share my maverick views of this business I've spent the last half-century working in, enjoying and observing.

3 thoughts on “Almost the Ultimate in ‘Not Interested’ Segmentation”

  1. Mr. Rosenwald, it´s a pleasure to follow your discoveries, which, if certainly not so surprising, are certainly bringing common sense to the black box of the business models of the no-evil new (media) companies.

    1. Thanks Mr. Calliari. It’s always a pleasure to discover that people are actually reading what one writes and remembering the ‘no evil’ monkeys which jump happily and guilt-free in the branches of the data trees and eat algorithms for breakfast with their bananas.

      1. I buy that metaphor, but with different subjects. Monkeys are probably more fit to consumers, us, who give information for free in exchange the bananas that will provide short term satisfaction.

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