Will Slack Replace Email?

After 15-plus years and many failed alternatives, it began to look like email was simply the best option for business. That was, until 2013 when a quirky application called Slack made its debut. Since then, the platform has largely been a critical success, boasting adoption at major organizations like CNN, NASA, eBay and The Wall Street Journal. But is Slack really an “email killer” or is it just nice to have?

EmailWhen it comes to corporate communications, email has reigned for decades, seemingly able to fend off established modes and new challengers alike. The telephone? A relic. Instant messaging? Complement, not substitute. Even social media has struggled to find traction.

After 15-plus years and many failed alternatives, it began to look like email was simply the best option for business. That was, until 2013 when a quirky application called Slack made its debut. Since then, the platform has largely been a critical success, boasting adoption at major organizations like CNN, NASA, eBay and The Wall Street Journal. But is Slack really an “email killer” or is it just nice to have?

Introduction to Slack

Slack is a cloud-based collaboration tool that enables people to chat and share files in a highly customizable environment. In a discerningly humble manner, Slack calls its product “a messaging app for teams.” This doesn’t quite convey the full range of features included in its Plus edition, which costs just $12.50 per month. Of course, it does deliver on being a messaging app, but Slack’s usefulness is really in its structure and intuitiveness.

Communications take place in channels, private channels and direct messages. Users can write posts, upload files and interact in a variety of ways. Write back, set a reminder, even add a “reaction” (this brings up the Emoji keyboard for graphical responses). If that isn’t enough to get the job done, Slack can also bring in third party applications like Twitter and Google Hangouts so users get all notifications in one spot.

email pic RPSlack: A Worthy Opponent

Slack is nimble. Slack is quick. Slack is even fun. Its highly collaborative environment breaks down many of the barriers between email and social media. The former is oftentimes stuffy and formal, while the latter can be seen as chaotic and even unprofessional. In fact, many companies still struggle with the question of whether to allow social media in the workplace at all, for fear it will be more of a distraction than a useful tool. Since Slack is a closed system (i.e., employees aren’t bouncing from contract negotiations to baby pictures), it delivers the casualness of social with the focus of email.

One of the greatest “social” features in Slack is the ability for channel members to add emojis to posts, indicating they like it, love it, were amused by it, etc. This seemingly minor addition helps build a more engaging environment in which team members can express themselves. Additionally, Slack lets users tag people within ongoing conversations to re-engage them in the discussion. This addresses the common low-tech practice of highlighting or bolding individual names on emails, which doesn’t even guarantee they will take notice — particularly on emails with 20 names in the “To:” line.

Author: Kevin Kelleher

Kevin Kelleher leads marketing for Return Path Consumer Insight line of business. He helps people see how data can be used to make smarter decisions. In his spare time, Kevin enjoys running, reading and fencing.

2 thoughts on “Will Slack Replace Email?”

  1. One of the rare techish articles I’ve read that has humor, clarity, and just enough tech talk to make me continue to read and understand the subject. For some reason, even though I love email with all my hardened heart, slack sounds intriguing and will investigate further. I think it’s because of its name – like star1234 below says, I’d be proud to be called a slacker. Thanks for a swell article.

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