7 Outrageous Lead Management Errors and How to Fix Them

In last month’s blog post we introduced the five core marketing processes essential to effective and efficient marketing operations. This month we will delve into the first, and most important of these processes, the lead management process.

Stop LightIn last month’s blog post, we introduced the five core marketing processes essential to effective and efficient marketing operations. This month we will delve into the first, and most important of these processes, the lead management process.

I believe it is the most important because, if poorly designed and executed, marketing cannot accurately determine how many quality leads it is passing to the sales channels, and how much influence its activities are having on revenue. What could be more important than that?

List of Ingredients for an Effective Lead Management Process

The lead management process outlines the steps for tracking and reporting on leads as they are created and move through a funnel. During this process leads become qualified or disqualified, and eventually pass on to a lead development team and finally onto sales or channel partners.

A typical lead management process includes the following six components:

  • Definition of a sales ready lead
  • Definition of the various lead statuses in the CRM defined funnel
  • Design of the lead processing, routing, and related notifications
  • Design of the lead scoring algorithm
  • Development and agreement on a service level agreement (SLA) between sales and marketing
  • Establishment of funnel metrics

In the process of adding more detail behind each of these, I will include examples of these 7 egregious errors in each, and how to avoid them.

  1. Failure to involve sales in defining a sales ready lead
  2. Failure to add lead status values for purchased list imports
  3. Inclusion of call dispositions as lead status values
  4. Failing to create and use a contact status field
  5. Failing to periodically review and refresh the lead scoring algorithm
  6. Failure to measure and enforce the sales and marketing SLA
  7. Funnel metrics that fail to account for unusual lead flow patterns

Definition of a Sales Ready Lead

Simply put, if you are in demand generation, your output is largely sales ready leads that have the potential to become opportunities for the sales channel. As such, you absolutely require an agreement between sales and marketing as to what constitutes a sales ready lead. And the error too many firms make is allowing marketing to decide what constitutes a sales ready lead all by themselves.

The result is that junk leads from events and the website are tossed over the fence to sales, who quickly recognize them for what they are, and learn to ignore leads from marketing.

It is very important to get sales people and sales management in the room with marketing and knock out a definition that both can live with. Marketing may not be able to get the B.A.N.T. criteria (budget, authority, need, time frame) without the help of lead development reps (LDRs). So what info can marketing solicit through forms, data appending, firmagraphics and observed behavioral data? What info does a LDR have to add? All of this info will inform the lead scoring algorithm discussed below.

Definition of Lead Statuses

Ah yes, you might think this one is easy, take the standard set of values including Inquiry, MQL, SAL, SQL, and Disqualified, and we’re done … right? Wrong. There are a couple of errors here that I see too often.

Driving Demand Generation: Who Belongs on That Bus?

In last month’s blog post, I discussed the ideal marketing operations structure — the why and how to centralize this vital function. In this post, we explore the demand generation function. What should be part of this function and how should you reconcile it with having a “shared services” team?

Revenue Marketing RoadmapIn last month’s blog post, I discussed the ideal marketing operations (MO) structure — the why and how to centralize this vital function. In this post, we explore the demand generation function.

What should be part of this function and how to reconcile it with having a “shared services” team in MO? How would you go about centralizing all demand generation into this one group if you currently have an outbound team and a separate inbound team under different directors?

Demand Generation Group Structure

The charter of a demand generation group looks like this:

Responsible for driving revenue results and optimizing interactions with all global buyers across the revenue cycle to accelerate predictable revenue growth.

Consequently, in larger organizations you are likely to see the following functions in this group:

Demand generation group functions
Demand generation group functions.

If that chart doesn’t scream a set of questions for you, its time for another cup of coffee!

Program managers, top-level business managers for marketing investment in demand generation, provide direction to the content team, and ultimately own the number: marketing influenced revenue.

Campaign managers take direction from the program managers. They are probably the same person in smaller firms. Campaign managers may specialize in one or more channels, but since campaigns are becoming omnichannel you are better off having them focused by target market segment. Their campaigns are grouped by stages of the buying cycle by segment — awareness, lead acquisition, lead nurturing, customer loyalty, advocacy etc.

The martech power users, QA and best practices management functions could alternatively be executed in a marketing operations department. Keeping them in demand generation means they continue to operate close to the program and campaign management team. On the other hand, if your MO function is well developed, putting them in the shared services group in MO means they are close to analytics and project management. This means this team will probably have a more streamlined relationship with the field marketing team, i.e. the “HQ” region is less likely to dominate the global campaign calendar unless the revenue goals merit it.

Tele-qualification is often both in marketing and sales. If the line is blurry, that’s good. It should be, because the function is squarely on the line between the two organizations. If you use them to sell smaller deals, renew contracts, etc, then they probably belong in sales, and are rightfully described as an inside sales function. But if the function is strictly to provide higher quality leads to sales, driving up sales’ productivity, then keep them in marketing.

An Inbound vs. Outbound Digression

There are more internet battles on inbound versus outbound than about Kirk versus Picard! Some say inbound is less expensive than outbound for lead generation or that outbound is marketing to the masses (TV commercials, radio, email blasts, trade shows). Is inbound just content marketing using SEO, and paid traffic through online channels? By all means add your comments below, but here is my perspective: It is not news that the two are merging so marketers need to move past these debates, unite these teams, and start designing and executing omnichannel campaigns.

Donald Trump Gets the Why Behind the Buy

Ted Cruz still doesn’t know what hit him. Neither do most of the Republican party establishment, and large segments of the non-Republican electorate. But Carolyn Goodman has a pretty good idea: “Trump really understands the why behind the buy.”

Last night, a beleaguered Ted Cruz suspended his campaign after yet another loss to Donald Trump on the Republican primary campaign trail. After another drubbing in a state that was supposed to reject Trump’s big city conservative populism, Cruz said, “It appears that path has been foreclosed.”

Ted Cruz still doesn’t know what hit him. Neither do most of the Republican party establishment, and large segments of the non-Republican electorate. But Carolyn Goodman has a pretty good idea.

“Trump really understands the why behind the buy,” said Carolyn, president and creative director of Goodman Marketing Partners, during yesterday’s webinar on optimizing lead nurturing.

Pain Point Research > Persona Research

Carolyn’s answer was in response to an audience member’s question during the webinar Q&A: “Do Donald Trump and Bernie Sanders demonstrate that emotion drives more than facts?”

And it tied into something Carolyn said earlier in the webinar: Know the why behind the buy.

What that means is, for anyone asking people to choose their brand — whether it’s at the store, in an email or on the campaign trail — understanding why customers are in the market and why they choose your brand over another is the most important factor to turning a lead into a sale.

In fact, she said doing research on the pain points that lead customers to choose you, and marketing to those pain points, is far more important to successful lead nurturing and long-term sales than marketing to personas.

In effect, what you know about why they buy is more important than what you know about their demographics, niche and theoretical wants. And Donald Trump’s campaign is a perfect example of this, according to Goodman.

Donald Trump’s Marketing Epiphany

While the rest of the Republican field developed messaging around the grooved talking points of GOP politics today, Trump identified the why behind the buy (or vote).

This time, many Republican voters are making the buy based on frustration with what they see as stifling political correctness and a coddling bureaucracy that they don’t think can protect the country from a host of threats. And the only thing they want to vote for is change, to get “bought” career politicians out of office.

That’s the why behind their buy, and Donald Trump gets that.

If Trump hears voters saying the other candidates aren’t willing to tell what they see as a “truth” about immigrants, Muslims, tariffs or any other topic, he embraces that “truth” and speaks it as often as he can. If the other candidates say something might not be achievable, or affordable, Trump tells voters it is and he’ll make sure it’s paid for.

If voters are frustrated about politicians not doing something, Trump promises to do it. If they’re frustrated that something’s not being said, he says it.

Trump’s not over-analyzing the demographics or overthinking the personas of his voters. Instead he’s just listening to his likely voters’ pain points and addressing them.

Trump gets the why behind his customers’ buys.

Do you get the why behind yours?

Turn Leads Into Prospects by Nurturing

“We need more leads.” That’s the rallying cry from most sales-driven organizations. If you ask the sales team what defines a lead, they’ll tell you “high quality.” That translates to “ready to buy decision-makers who have a budget in place”. Sure, piece of cake — let me snap my fingers.

Nurture“We need more leads.” That’s the rallying cry from most sales-driven organizations.

If you ask the sales team what defines a lead, they’ll tell you “high quality.” That translates to “ready to buy decision-makers who have a budget in place”. Sure, piece of cake — let me snap my fingers.

If you ask the marketing team what defines a lead, they’ll tell you “high volume.” They want to deliver enough leads to sales so they will stop whining.

The challenge, of course, is these two objectives are at odds. Yet, when working with many marketers, they have not budgeted to take the extra time and expense necessary to help cull down leads from simply being aware of the product/service to actually be sales-ready — ready for a conversation about the possibility of making a purchase.

That missing link is called lead nurturing, and it’s why so many companies are failing at converting leads into warm prospects.

Lead Nurturing: The Holy Grail
According to a 2011 article in the Harvard Business Review, 23 percent of firms never follow up on leads at all. A more recent 2012 study published in Forbes showed that 73 percent of leads never get contacted. But, why not?

Marketing Sherpa claims a whopping 68 percent of B-to-B organizations have not even identified their sales funnel — the buying process that companies use to lead prospects from awareness to interest, interest to desire and desire to purchase.

Lead nurturing is an art and more often than not, companies get it all wrong.

When an individual downloads a whitepaper, it’s signaling an interest in a topic. If that whitepaper is based on good old fashioned research, it addresses a pain point that’s common in the industry.

The first challenge is too many whitepapers are written as either self-serving brochures or are plastered with marketing hype so the reader is turned off immediately. For some insight into what makes a good whitepaper, read my previous blog, “Have Whitepapers Lost Their Strategic Purpose.”

But, after the document is downloaded, then what? Please, I beg you, don’t call. Your prospect is not ready to have a conversation. They are probably at the start of their buying journey — they are in information gathering mode. And your job is to help them get educated so that they ultimately reach the right conclusion — your product or service may be the answer.

To get them to that point, you need to nurture them. Follow up with an email and a link to an additional asset — another whitepaper, a helpful video or an executive briefing. But, definitely don’t send a brochure.

Get Off the Content Hamster Wheel

Content is king, to be sure. But how did we end up on this crazy treadwheel, cranking out B-to-B content for content’s sake? Daily blog posts. Three tweets a day. Monthly whitepapers. Infinite infographics. We’re sacrificing quality for quantity. We’re becoming irrelevant. We’re knee deep in Content Spam. This has got to stop.

Hamsters in a Wheel
Are you spinning the content, or is the content spinning you?

Content is king, to be sure. But how did we end up on this crazy content hamster wheel, cranking out B-to-B content for content’s sake? Daily blog posts. Three tweets a day. Monthly whitepapers. Infinite infographics. Videos everywhere. Podcasts, e-books. We’re sacrificing quality for quantity. We’re becoming irrelevant. We’re knee deep in Content Spam. This has got to stop.

Check out these stats from IDG. They brilliantly ran a study of IT buyers in the US and UK that directly connects irrelevant content with sales results. Of US tech buyers, 66 percent said that digital content needs to be “more aligned with organizational objectives and relevant to the decision-making process.” It could be that IT buyers are more demanding than those in other job functions — but I doubt it.

Wait, it gets worse: 79 percent of the buyers told IDG that the level of content relevance affects the vendor’s “likelihood to make the short list.” Now, that hurts. But here’s the zinger: A vendor is 25 percent more likely to be actually dropped from the shortlist if its content does not meet a minimum level of relevance. Uh-oh. This is the opposite of customer relationship management.

In the SEO world, the notion of “content spam” has been around for a couple of years. Search professionals decry the practice of loading up websites with keyword-stuffed crap designed to fool search engines into thinking they are informative and popular. But what I am talking about is customers and prospects, not search engines. We are loading up our customers with crap.

To keep your content relevant, here are five principles to live by:

  • Tailor your content to the market need, by analyzing your customer’s buying process and buying roles, and developing a library of content assets to help them solve their problems.
  • Be disciplined about new content quantity. Do you need this item? Will it fill a gaping hole in your asset library? Stand up against the pressure to generate content for content’s sake.
  • To feed the SEO beast, repurpose existing content instead of relentlessly creating new. There are zillions of options for clever reuse. Good quality content is likely to have an evergreen capability to serve incoming prospects over time.
  • Cull your content regularly. It’s hard, I know. We all fall in love with our creations. It might be a good idea to bring in a third party to assess your library, and give an objective opinion on what can stay and what needs to go.
  • Choose your content distribution channels carefully. Joe Pulizzi — who should know — makes a compelling case for limiting yourself to a few key communications vehicles, and doing them really well.

Let’s go for relevant, top quality content. Less is more.

A version of this article appeared in Biznology, the digital marketing blog.

5 Data-Driven Marketing Catalysts for 2016 Growth

The new year tends to bring renewal, the promise of doing something new, better and smarter. I get a lot of calls looking for ideas and strategies to help improve the focus and performance of marketers’ plans and businesses. What most organizations are looking for is one or more actionable catalysts in their business.

The new year tends to bring renewal and the promise of doing something new, better and smarter. I get a lot of calls looking for ideas and strategies to help improve the focus and performance of marketers’ plans and businesses. What most organizations are looking for is one or more actionable marketing catalysts in their business.

To help you accelerate your thinking, here is a list of those catalysts that have something for everyone, some of which can be great food for thought as you tighten up plans. This year, you will do well if you resolve to do the following five things:

  • Build a Scalable Prospect Database Program. Achieving scale in your business is perhaps the greatest challenge we face as marketers. Those who achieve scale on their watch are the most sought-after marketing pros in their industries — because customer acquisition is far from cheap and competition grows more fiercely as the customer grows more demanding and promiscuous. A scientifically designed “Prospect Database Program” is one of the most effective ways great direct marketers can achieve scale — though not all prospecting databases and solutions are created equally.

A great prospecting database program requires creating a statistical advantage in targeting individuals who don’t already know your brand, or don’t already buy your brand. That advantage is critical if the program is to become cost-effective. Marketers who have engaged in structured prospecting know how challenging it is.

A prospect database program uses data about your very best existing customers: What they bought, when, how much and at what frequency. And it connects that transaction data to oceans of other data about those individuals. That data is then used to test which variables are, in fact, more predictive. They will come back in three categories: Those you might have “guessed” or “known,” those you guessed but proved less predictive than you might have thought, and those that are simply not predictive for your customer.

Repeated culling of that target is done through various statistical methods. What we’re left with is a target where we can begin to predict what the range of response looks like before we start. As the marketer, you can be more aggressive or conservative in the final target definition and have a good sense as to how well it will convert prospects in the target to new customers. This has a powerful effect on your ability to intelligently invest in customer acquisition, and is very effective — when done well — at achieving scale.

  • Methodically ID Your VIPs — and VVIPs to Distinguish Your ‘Gold’ Customers. It doesn’t matter what business you are in. Every business has “Gold” Customers — a surprisingly small percentage of customers that generate up to 80 percent of your revenue and profit.

With a smarter marketing database, you can easily identify these customers who are so crucial to your business. Once you have them, you can develop programs to retain and delight them. Here’s the “trick” though — don’t just personalize the website and emails to them. Don’t give them a nominally better offer. Instead, invest resources that you simply cannot afford to spend on all of your customers. When the level of investment in this special group begins to raise an eyebrow, you know for certain you are distinguishing that group, and wedding them to your brand.

Higher profits come from leveraging this target to retain the best customers, and motivating higher potential customers who aren’t “Gold” Customers yet to move up to higher “status” levels. A smart marketing database can make this actionable. One strategy we use is not only IDing the VIPs, but the VVIP’s (very, very important customers). Think about it, how would you feel being told you’re a “VVIP” by a brand that matters to you? You are now special to the brand — and customers who feel special tend not to shop with many other brands — a phenomenon also known as loyalty. So if you’d like more revenues from more loyal customers, resolve to use your data to ID which customers are worth investing in a more loyal relationship.

  • Target Customers Based on Their Next Most Likely Purchase. What if you knew when your customer was most likely to buy again? To determine the next most likely purchase, an analytics-optimized database is used to determine when customers in each segment usually buy and how often.

Once we have that purchase pattern calculated, we can ID customers who are not buying when the others who have acted (bought) similarly are buying. It is worth noting, there is a more strategic opportunity here to focus on these customers; as when they “miss” a purchase, this is usually because they are spending with a competitor. “Next Most Likely Purchase” models help you to target that spending before it’s “too late.”

The approach requires building a model that is statistically validated and then tested. Once that’s done, we have a capability that is consistently very powerful.

  • Target Customers Based on Their Next Most Likely Product or Category. We can determine the product a customer is most likely to buy “next.” An analytics-ready marketing database (not the same as a CRM or IT warehouse/database) is used to zero-in on the customers who bought a specific product or, more often, in a specific category or subcategory, by segment.

Similar to the “Next Most Likely Purchase” models, these models are used to find “gaps” in what was bought, as like-consumers tend to behave similarly when viewed in large enough numbers. When there is one of these gaps, it’s often because they bought the product from a competitor, or found an acceptable substitute — trading either up or down. When you target based upon what they are likely to buy at the right time, you can materially increase conversion across all consumers in your database.

  • Develop or Improve Your Customer Segmentation. Smart direct marketing database software is required to store all of the information and be able to support queries and actions that it will take to improve segmentation.

This is an important point, as databases tend to be purpose-specific. That is, a CRM database might be well-suited for individual communications and maintaining notes and histories about individual customers, but it’s probably not designed to perform the kind of queries required, or structure your data to do statistical target definition that is needed in effectively acquiring large numbers of new customers.

Successful segmentation must be done in a manner that helps you both understand your existing customers and their behaviors, lifestyles and most basic make up — and be able to help you acquire net-new customers, at scale. Success, of course, comes from creating useful segments, and developing customer marketing strategies for each segment.

LinkedIn Sales Navigator: Deciding if It’s Worth It

Is LinkedIn Sales Navigator worth it for sales prospecting? And how can you measure the investment — and end it if it’s not? I’ve consulted my most trusted resources — and clients — on the answer. Because what we need is an honest answer from people who are interested in growing their business — not just LinkedIn’s! Here are the results I’ve found in guideline format. The consensus seems strong. In 95 percent of cases you may not need a Sales Navigator or Premium level account.

Is LinkedIn Sales Navigator worth it for sales prospecting? And how can you measure the investment — and end it if it’s not?

I’ve consulted my most trusted resources — and clients — on the answer. Because what we need is an honest answer from people who are interested in growing their business — not just LinkedIn’s!

Here are the results I’ve found in guideline format. The consensus seems strong. In 95 percent of cases you may not need a Sales Navigator or Premium level account.

Key Consideration Points
Let’s keep it simple. Here’s what the average B-to-B sales prospecting person needs to consider. Point by point.

  1. The Free Trial: Is one month enough time to judge?
  2. The cost: When and how will it be recovered?
  3. The yardstick for success: Leads found and qualified faster, not trivial activity.

The Problem With a 30-day Trial
I rarely hear anyone talking about this aspect. Yet I’m not sure why. In most B-to-B sales environments a 30 day free trial is not enough time to judge any sales prospecting tool, tactic or strategy.

Even in today’s fast-paced social selling world LinkedIn’s 30 day trial period is far too short.

One of my most trusted sales training colleagues put it this way: “What sales team wants to commit to a playing field that moves the goal posts every couple of months? If I have a six month sales cycle, please explain what good a one month free trial does me?”

Thus, please understand that the free trial isn’t actually free. It’s a discount on your first six months of Navigator subscription. Because many of us need at least 6 to 12 months to understand if this is having positive impact on the bottom line — finding and closing new clients faster.

Justifying the Cost
The fastest way to understand if the investment might be worthwhile is to examine the benefits — but with a sales hat firmly on. Sales Navigator Professional (for individuals) gets you:

  • InMail: The one perk that everyone knows about.
  • Free incoming InMail: Anyone on LinkedIn can send you a message, free.
  • More search filters: You get an additional eight filters (although some are not applicable at all to sellers)
  • More saved searches: Very handy if you have a set of searches you do repeatedly.
  • More search results: You can see two hundred, four hundred or more.
  • Unlimited profile search: You will not need to worry about hitting LinkedIn’s arbitrary Commercial Search Limit.
  • Introductions: You can send a message to someone you would like to meet through a mutual LinkedIn connection.
  • Who’s Viewed Your Profile visibility: You get more visibility into who has viewed your profile.
  • Automated lead recommendations and real time news insights on leads.

I’m not saying any of these features are good or bad. Rather, we must question if they are worth paying $79 per month to access. In particular, most of my clients find the ability to search an unlimited number of times beneficial. How much so? This varies on individual experience.

And therein lies the tricky part: Generating enough experience with these features to pass fair judgement.

The Yardstick for Success
This is a tricky issue extending beyond the problem with a 30 day trial. It is unclear when significant cost breaks on the $129 per seat Team fee comes into play. This is not publicly discussed by LinkedIn. More importantly, justifying the cost must come in the form of hard numbers.

Sales related numbers.

The vast majority of businesses I’m finding measure soft value when building a business case for Sales Navigator. LinkedIn itself is encouraging this “soft yardstick” via it’s Social Selling Index. (SSI)

True, each category of the SSI is based on a practice vital to success using LinkedIn. They are important to your productivity, effectiveness … ultimately, your success at finding and closing leads faster.

Beware of Vanity Metrics
LinkedIn’s social selling index is flawed as a measurement tool when building a business case.

Because establishing your brand, finding the right people, engaging and building relationships are the basis for the SSI. However, each of these has an (unmeasured) quality component that directly drives business value.

Here’s the rub: When reps have a lower skill set at communicating with prospects they will always have lower success at earning meetings and closing deals with them. You can brand, engage and connect all you want.

In the end, the more effectively reps communicate the more deals get discovered, nurtured and closed.

Yet LinkedIn’s main tool of measurement is based purely on a quantitative basis.

Bottom line: The SSI is a potential indicator of productivity. However, being an active user of LinkedIn does not make you a productive seller.

Sales productivity takes more; it takes qualitative behavior and specific business outcomes. Knowing how to make a sales appointment via email or InMail trumps being able to simply send email!

What do you think about how I’m approaching this? Am I off the mark? How are you approaching building the business case?

 

Sales Follow-up Emails: The Most Effective Formula

Earning a reply to your initial email is simple. Spark the prospect’s curiosity. But what comes next? How do you follow-up effectively once invited to do so? What do you write and how — so potential buyers will reply again?

Earning a reply to your initial email is simple. Spark the prospect’s curiosity. But what comes next? How do you follow-up effectively once invited to do so? What do you write and how — so potential buyers will reply again?

Spark their curiosity. Again. However, it’s also time to hyper-target your prospect’s pain, fear or goal.

It really is that simple.

Here is a real life example. I’m sharing so you can copy the technique in your setting.

Here’s the gist of what works: When replying to the prospect’s invitation, help the buyer want to tell you about “the conversation already going on” in their head.

This helps you build a conversation about what is most important to them — not what you’re selling.

A Successful “First Touch” Email Example
One of my readers took advice (from this blog) and turned it into a response. I love when that happens.

Connor emailed me saying, “Your technique for getting permission to have a longer conversation is working great. What I would like to know is what angle I should take once permission is given… or the curiosity has sparked a response.”

Here is the exact first touch approach Connor used to earn the first response.

Subject Line: Is this a fit for you, ___ [first name]?

Savings accounts, bonds, and CD’s are currently earning less then 1% while the cost of living rises at 1.7%. There are other places to allocate your resources that offer a competitive rate while retaining a low risk mindset for your savings and also provide tax advantages.

In the interest of time would a short email conversation makes sense? Let me know what you decide, _____ [first name]?

Thanks for considering,
Connor

The prospect responded with, “Yes that is something I would be interested in discussing. What type of investment options do you offer?”

Connor is a financial adviser who offers different investment options. He says, “The products don’t sell themselves. The (sales) process we use conveys the value of our products.”

Thus, it’s critical for him to get into the flow of a buyer-focused conversation.

He asked me, “Do you have a proven approach to moving this situation forward and getting the appointment or should I explain what the product I was referring to in my response?”

Indeed, I do.

Pinpoint the Pain or Goal
In Connor’s case, the prospect responded by asking about investment options. That’s what Connor sells. He used a “near-term buying first-touch” approach. And the buyer is curios about his solution to the problem. Success!

However, this can be a dangerous situation.

The best way forward in the second touch is over-focusing on the prospect. Here’s what I mean.

In Connor’s case, the buyer is opening the door to talk about his solution, the product. However, it’s best to resist this temptation.

Instead, to earn another reply, I ask one brief but purposeful question. Two max. This qualifies your lead. It also helps you know how, exactly, to respond and move the discussion forward.

For example, Connor should reply,

“I will be glad to talk options, ___ [first name]. But I need to know more about you, please, to help. Are you invested in CD’s, bonds (low rate options) now? Are you doing everything possible to protect yourself from outliving your retirement savings?”

They’ll Tell You How to Reply
New customers will tell you what will trigger them to buy. Sometimes in the second email you receive from them. Choose your words carefully. Help them to open up and tell you.

The goal of your second email message is not to pitch your wares. Instead, it is to:

  1. Earn another reply, (keep it very short!)
  2. Trigger an “avalanche” response, (allow your buyer to become emotional)
  3. Pinpoint the buyer’s exact pain or objective. (so you can address it)

By identifying what matters most to the buyer you’ll know exactly how to reply in a way that builds credibility and curiosity in your solution. Remember: An emotional reply from a prospect validates how important a given issue may be to them. Additional curiosity (more questions) indicates the lead is a good one.

Bottom line: Your second email message will yield a response that qualifies the lead. The reply it generates will tell you exactly what to talk about in the next email message. The buyer will tell you — again!

A Stream of Curiosity
Always answer questions the prospect asks — but do so in ways that create more questions in their minds. Hold a little back. This helps create more curiosity.

Structure the way you reply. Be deliberate about it.

Don’t be coy. This isn’t about trickery or dangling a carrot in a way that will annoy the prospect. Be direct and specific. Yet hold back on the details. This will help your prospect feel an urge to ask you about them.

Good luck!