Content Marketing After the Sale

If the content you’re creating is aimed only at prospects and leads, you’re missing an important marketing opportunity. Content marketing to existing clients will help you increase revenue and ROI for your content marketing program.

How to Drive Your Customer's Lifecycle to Increase Revenue and RetentionIf the content you’re creating is aimed only at prospects and leads, you’re missing an important marketing opportunity. Content marketing to existing clients will help you increase revenue and ROI for your content marketing program.

First and foremost, paying attention to clients after the sale in ways that appear (to the client) to go above and beyond is one of the best ways to build the kind of emotional connection that creates raving fans and lifelong clients. (To say nothing of killer net promoter scores.)

Second, your prospects aren’t paying attention to what you tell them. Sad, true fact. So even though you know you’ve reviewed with them the full range of your services — and your breadth of expertise may even have influenced their decision to become a client — they don’t remember any of that. They just know they needed X and they hired you you did X, whatever X might be.

Post-sale content marketing is your opportunity to remind them that you also do Y and Z, and that Y and Z are valuable complements to the X already in place.

Finally, your content marketing to existing clients should subtly point out that you and they have both invested a lot in you learning enough about their business to service them well. There’s great value to be leveraged, and most clients recognize that even if their primary focus is on the path of least resistance: keeping your current vendor is almost always easier than vetting and on boarding a new one. The key is to make clear that there’s value beyond eliminating new-vendor hassles.

How? Here are a few ideas:

Research: Set up alerts to follow your client, their biggest competitors, and the industry. You can pass some of this information on as interesting items to be aware of. Better still is news they can use: news along with some insight related to their business.

Some portion of the info you provide should be related to your area of expertise, though you’ll want to be careful to stay well clear of the line between “news they can use” and “news which helps me sell them more stuff.” Out-and-out promotion wrapped in content marketing — or anything else — gets old fast. And don’t discount the fact that offering information completely unrelated to what your firm does makes it crystal clear that you’re paying attention to their company and their industry.

Post-sale content marketing should also be viewed as a long-term commitment, not only in it being an effort you’ll need to make over a long period of time, but in it being an opportunity to point out future possibilities rather than current needs. Again, this can help you show that you’re paying attention to their needs.

And that’s probably the key point to be made here, as in all content marketing: the client’s needs.

One last note that is often overlooked: Your champion at any given client isn’t always going to be there. So make sure your content marketing includes materials that he or she would be comfortable passing on to peers and superiors. You want to expand your reach and win more champions inside the firm, if not for increased sales today, then to maintain existing sales in the future.

Author: Andrew Schulkind

Since 1996, Andrew Schulkind has asked clients one simple question: what does digital marketing success look like, and how can marketing progress be measured?

A veteran content marketer, web developer, and digital strategist, Andrew founded Andigo New Media to help firms encourage audience engagement through solid information architecture, a great user experience, and compelling content. A dash of common sense doesn’t hurt, either.

His work touches social media, search-engine optimization, and email marketing, among other components, and he has presented at Social Media Week NY and WordCampNYC, among other events. His writing appears in various online and print publications. 

Andrew graduated with a B.A. in Philosophy from Bucknell University. He engages in a range of community volunteer work and is an avid fly fisherman and cyclist. He also loves collecting meaningless trivia. (Did you know the Lone Ranger made his mask from the cloth of his brother's vest after his brother was killed by "the bad guys?")

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