Don’t Let Old Habits Dictate Your Marketing Thoughts

When marketers play with data, we often get confined within the limitations of the datasets that are available to us, or worse, tool sets through which we get to access data. Some bad habits live through an organization for multiple generations, as we all get trained in marketing thoughts, in the beginning of our careers, by others who have been doing similar jobs.

marketing thoughts
Credit: Pixabay by Mohamed Hassan

When marketers play with data, we often get confined within the limitations of the datasets that are available to us, or worse, tool sets through which we get to access data. Some bad habits live through an organization for multiple generations, as we all get trained in marketing thoughts, in the beginning of our careers, by others who have been doing similar jobs.

When a few iterations of such training go on through a series of onboarding processes, the original intents of data, reporting and analytics get diluted. And the organization ends up just using those marketing thoughts to go through motions of producing lots of reports that no one cares about or benefits from. I’ve heard some radical claims that the majority of decision-makers today won’t miss over half of automatically generated reports.

We shouldn’t really look at a single report or initiate data-related projects without setting a clear goal first. Often, the most important role of a consultant is to remind clients “why” they should do anything in the first place.

For example, why should we all watch clickthrough rates every day, often locked in a set frame of time parameters? As in, compared to the same time last year, the clickthrough rate went down by 0.8%! The horror! Why do marketers make a big fuss about it, when the clickthrough rate is just one of many indicators, not even the most effective one at that, of actual purchases? Because someone in the past set the KPI reports up that way?

In other words, sometimes marketers and analysts who help them needed to be reminded that the goal is to sell more things and retain customers, not live and die with open and clickthrough rates. I am not flatly dismissing those important metrics at all; I’m just pointing out that we need to have a goal-oriented mindset when dealing with data and analytics. Otherwise, we end up in a maze of metrics and activities that do not really help us achieve organizational goals.

What are those ultimate goals? Not that I want to be a smart ass who would say “From Earth” to an innocuous question “Where are you from?”, but let’s really go to that high level for a moment; we play with data (1) to increase the revenue, or (2) to decrease the cost. Since Profit=Revenue-Cost, well, we can even reduce this whole thing to just one goal: Increase the Profit.

Why am I pointing out the obvious? Because I’ve seen too many data players who just go through motions without questioning the original intent of the activity or key metrics, and blindly believe that all that hard work will somehow lead to success. Unfortunately, that is far from the truth.

If you run on an airplane midflight, would you get to the destination any sooner? Definitely not. In fact, the captain may even go back to the originating airport to drop such crazy person off, further elongating the length of the journey.

You may think this analogy is silly, but in the world of data and analytics, such detours happen all of the time. All because no one questioned how and why any activity set in motion in the distant past would continue to help achieve long and short-term organizational goals – especially when goals need to be constantly adjusted thanks to ever-changing business environments. Nothing in scientific activities, no marketing thoughts, should be carved in stone.

That is why the first question by a seasoned consultant should be what the organization’s long and short-term goals are. Okay, we can all easily agree that we are all in this data and analytics game to increase profit, but what are the specific goals, and what are the immediate pain points? Of course, like any good doctor, a consultant must remedy immediate pain points first. But what do we call those doctors who make the patient’s condition worse just to relieve immediate pain? We call them quacks.

Bringing back this discussion to the world of marketing, having the clear long and short-term goals for every data and analytical activity is a must. If you do that, you may never need an expensive consultant just to remind you that you are wasting resources digging wrong places. Clear business goals beget proper problem statements (not just list of all symptoms and wish lists), which beget appropriate measurement metrics, which in turn lead us to proper digging points in terms of data and methodology, which would minimize waste of time and energy to achieve predetermined goals. In short, we can avoid lots of mishaps and detours just by remembering the original intents of data and analytics endeavors.

Author: Stephen H. Yu

Stephen H. Yu is a world-class database marketer. He has a proven track record in comprehensive strategic planning and tactical execution, effectively bridging the gap between the marketing and technology world with a balanced view obtained from more than 30 years of experience in best practices of database marketing. Currently, Yu is president and chief consultant at Willow Data Strategy. Previously, he was the head of analytics and insights at eClerx, and VP, Data Strategy & Analytics at Infogroup. Prior to that, Yu was the founding CTO of I-Behavior Inc., which pioneered the use of SKU-level behavioral data. “As a long-time data player with plenty of battle experiences, I would like to share my thoughts and knowledge that I obtained from being a bridge person between the marketing world and the technology world. In the end, data and analytics are just tools for decision-makers; let’s think about what we should be (or shouldn’t be) doing with them first. And the tools must be wielded properly to meet the goals, so let me share some useful tricks in database design, data refinement process and analytics.” Reach him at stephen.yu@willowdatastrategy.com.

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