Exigency Is Gone, But Where Is Reform?

The bone chill of Sunday, April 10 in the Northeast may have reminded us how winter just wants to hold on, long after its calendar passing. However on that same day, a 4.3 percent exigency on U.S. postal rates was lifted — it felt warm for a moment, but deceptively so.

USPS default imageThe bone chill of Sunday, April 10 in the Northeast may have reminded us how winter just wants to hold on, long after its calendar passing. However on that same day, a 4.3 percent exigency on U.S. postal rates was lifted — it felt warm for a moment, but deceptively so.

While many mail and marketing groups have lauded exigency’s end, DMA among them, the one reality remains: Postal finances are a mess, and our very inactive Congress — not for lack of some leaders trying — has the keys to fix it.

Bouncing from crisis to crisis and kicking the can seems to be the Congressional leadership position of the past “count-them” 10 years. And none of the crises — defaults, exigencies and otherwise — seems to muster any amount of attention, unless of course, a local postal facility is slated to close. It’s really a travesty that microeconomics (and micromanaging), not macroeconomics, is the only motivation that some elected officials (not all) appear to have on this Constitution protection of mail delivery.

Will Congress act on our continued cry for postal reform? Probably not in an election year.

Yet Sen. Tom Carper (D-DE) is pushing for his iPOST bill, with some GOP support, with the marketer-disliked exigency likely to be reinserted alongside very much needed reforms (healthcare, plus). Hence, a compromise that perhaps — just perhaps — we can move ahead with one tweak or another? I’ll let our trade associations handle the maneuvering and wisdom of the bill alongside other USPS stakeholders.

Winter hanging on? Maybe waiting for postal reform was just too bitterly cold for the models of the Victoria’s Secret catalog.

Author: Chet Dalzell

Marketing Sustainably: A blog posting questions, opportunities, concerns and observations on sustainability in marketing. Chet Dalzell has 25 years of public relations management and expertise in service to leading brands in consumer, donor, patient and business-to-business markets, and in the field of integrated marketing. He serves on the ANA International ECHO Awards Board of Governors, as an adviser to the Direct Marketing Club of New York, and is senior director, communications and industry relations, with the Digital Advertising Alliance. Chet loves UConn Basketball (men's and women's) and Nebraska Football (that's just men, at this point), too! 

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