How to Employ Segmentation to Improve Your Content Marketing

Evaluating your content marketing specifically for each audience segment will yield insights that a program-wide analysis won’t capture. Audience segmentation isn’t just good for reaching the right people with the right message. Done well, it can help you learn more about your audience.

segmentation

Audience segmentation isn’t just good for reaching the right people with the right message. Done well, it can help you learn more about your audience. And learn more about how better to meet their needs.Your content marketing should be a part of that process.

  • First, if you are’t creating content specifically for different audience segments, please start doing so now.
  • Second, if you aren’t creating your audience segments based on their attributes and behavior, that’s another change you should make immediately. (“People who buy Product A from us” is not an effective audience segment.)

Assuming you do have useful audience segmentation in place, here’s how you can use it to learn more about your audience.

All Content Is Not Created Equal

Begin by evaluating your content marketing efforts on their own. Identify the 20% of your content that performs best and the 20% that performs worst. (We’ll come back to those bottom-of-the-barrel content elements in a bit.)

Your evaluation can be based on key performance metrics, running the gamut from page views to revenue generated. But you should include a range of process metrics and outcomes metrics.

We define process metrics as those data points, like page views, time on page, CTRs, etc., that can provide valuable insight into your audience’s interests, but don’t measure actual business performance. Outcomes metrics are those that relate to revenue generation, lead quality, lead volume, and so on.

You may be tempted to lean more heavily on outcomes metrics, if you have them. They are clearly more important in the long run. Page likes don’t pay the bills, after all. But our goal is to evaluate the health and effectiveness of our entire content marketing program. So, understanding how well we’re doing with early-stage prospects is important. The data points from early funnel activity are almost always going to be process oriented — content consumption, measures of engagement, micro-conversion numbers.

Cross-Referencing Your Results

With your raw performance information in-hand, look at these numbers again — broken down by audience segment. Here’s where you’ll see real value. If you can identify what content is resonating best with each audience segment, you can tailor programs to those audience segments, based on what they’re most interested in.

Rather than simply trying to double down on your best-performing content, you can provide content that performs best for each audience segment.

What About Your Underperforming Content?

You may also find that, rather than eliminating your less effective content, you can tailor it to a specific audience segment and have it perform much more effectively. This will likely require a deeper dive into whether any of the laggards are weak overall, despite being strong in one particular area.

Some of this work may require updates to your coding or your analytics reporting. Discuss what that investment is going to be with your tech team. Chances are, costs will be recouped quickly.

Once you get the hang of this approach, you’ll see benefits beyond your immediate results. This kind of deeper dive into your analytics data can help you evaluate information from disparate parts of your marketing efforts and yield insights that can impact your broader marketing effectiveness.

Author: Andrew Schulkind

Since 1996, Andrew Schulkind has asked clients one simple question: what does digital marketing success look like, and how can marketing progress be measured?

A veteran content marketer, web developer, and digital strategist, Andrew founded Andigo New Media to help firms encourage audience engagement through solid information architecture, a great user experience, and compelling content. A dash of common sense doesn’t hurt, either.

His work touches social media, search-engine optimization, and email marketing, among other components, and he has presented at Social Media Week NY and WordCampNYC, among other events. His writing appears in various online and print publications. 

Andrew graduated with a B.A. in Philosophy from Bucknell University. He engages in a range of community volunteer work and is an avid fly fisherman and cyclist. He also loves collecting meaningless trivia. (Did you know the Lone Ranger made his mask from the cloth of his brother's vest after his brother was killed by "the bad guys?")

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