Mastering the Complexities of Multichannel Digital Marketing

Integration is like the Holy Grail of marketing. Connecting the dots at the customer level, across channels, devices and owned and non-owned properties is hard, but not impossible. Multichannel marketers must commit to meeting the customer along a matrixed journey. In a session I led at DMA2014 in San Diego last month, we discussed the types of lifecycle marketing, automation and buyer-centric programs that are most effective for drawing marketers out of silos and into a collaborative multichannel approach.

Integration is like the Holy Grail of marketing. Connecting the dots at the customer level, across channels, devices and owned and non-owned properties is hard, but not impossible. Multichannel marketers must commit to meeting the customer along a matrixed journey.

In a session I led at DMA2014 in San Diego last month, we discussed the types of lifecycle marketing, automation and buyer-centric programs that are most effective for drawing marketers out of silos and into a collaborative multichannel approach.

Andrew “Drew” Bailey, marketing principal at FedEx, said that the most important thing is to have a roadmap that is blessed by the executive team. “We’re mapping out a 3-year roadmap for our strategic objectives, now branded ‘Purple Journey’ (color selected from the brand logo). We try not to be paralyzed by our own processes. We still have to keep the lights on while we move things forward.”

Customers don’t think about channels, so why are marketers still clinging to our silos? Silos occur for a very valid, if not a very good reason, said Staples Director of Analytics and Customer Insight James (Jim) Foreman. “You solve a single need, and then new needs are solved by bolting on something to the original solution and you end up with a lot of things duct-taped together,” he said. “To emerge out of the rut, you need to prioritize with people, upgrade your specifications and budget based on the benefits you will earn from the change.”

There is certainly a people-process-technology synergy that has to happen for great customer experience. “It’s a three-legged stool,” Jim said, “But the glue and power comes from data.” Technology has surpassed our ability to use it well, so a key aspect of your IMM and CRM planning has to be that terrible “P” word that all marketers hate because we really want to do it all, “Prioritization.”

“The purpose of marketing has not changed, but the technology has changed,” Jim said. “Now that we are smarter about—and faster to respond to—the customer, the key is to make sure that we still listen to customers and synchronize touchpoints to recognize people across channels. We’ve learned a lot by combing through the data, inserting touchpoints at conversion points (a video watch, certain session length, repeat purchase, email behaviors, change of address, etc.) and encourage customers to engage with us across a richer journey. We greet you at each new interaction, informed with data from the past—which customizes the experience as much as possible.

“That translates to higher share of wallet, as Staples becomes important to both business and personal needs (customer need), both office and technology needs (product offering), and offline and online (multichannel).”

Not all customers are created equal, and a huge benefit of CRM-driven marketing is to treat all customers well, but some customers better/differently. This allows more personal and custom experience, and builds brand loyalty—especially in competitive, price-driven markets.

“We deliver packages really well,” Drew said. “But when there are concerns, customers can be pretty vocal via social media, so you have to do a good job of addressing the needs of all customers, even when you mess up.”

One approach Drew shared: “We encourage all our team members to be patient, passionate and persistent. With a ‘Good, better, best’ approach, we can help employees be the champions of our customers.

“Change happens from the work of champions,” he continued.

The data that matters to us most is our own delivery performance data—we need the ops teams to play well with the marketing team, Drew said. Staples starts with basic Web behavior—views, clicks, purchases—but quickly augments with demographic data from online accounts and the loyalty program. “We find that a mix of data is most helpful to understanding the next-best offer,” Jim said.

Successful multichannel marketing is in large part due to the way each interaction is met and tackled by the various people and machines that make up your company’s front line. Focus on those that move the needle for your business, stick to an endorsed plan of action, and be nimble and open to changing as your customer and market demand.

Author: Stephanie Miller

Stephanie Miller leads the IMM/integrated marketing management practice for brand and marketing technology strategy firm TopRight (www.toprightpartners.com). She is a relentless customer advocate and a champion for marketers creating memorable customer experiences. A digital marketing and CRM expert, she helps sophisticated marketers balance the right mix of people, process and technology to optimize a data-driven content marketing strategy. She speaks and writes regularly and leads several industrywide initiatives. Feedback and column ideas are most welcome at smiller@toprightpartners.com or @stephanieSAM.

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