Personas, Be Gone: 1:1 Marketing Revisited

Soccer moms, coffee house professionals, gears-and-gadget guys — in the world of data marketing, the audience personas available to select from enterprising data vendors go on and on and on. Tailoring and targeting based on personas — with hundreds of variables and data elements — dominate the business rules that direct billions in media spending and gazillions of business rules built inside customer journey mapping.

personas

Millennials are not the only ones who eschew labels.

Soccer moms, coffee house professionals, gears-and-gadget guys — in the world of data marketing, the audience personas available to select from enterprising data vendors go on and on and on. Tailoring and targeting based on personas — with hundreds of variables and data elements — dominate the business rules that direct billions in media spending and gazillions of business rules built inside customer journey mapping. Practically every retailer, every brand, has a best customer look-alike model — and segments to that model.

But ask most consumers — they say they don’t want it that way.

An international survey released last week by Selligent Marketing Cloud, reported by Marketing Charts, says that 77 percent of U.S. consumers want to be marketed to as individuals, rather than as part of a larger segment.

Credit: MarketingCharts.com

The take-away seems to be that personalization at a 1:1 level should be any brand’s consumer engagement mantra. Throw out those data segments to which you may think I, the consumer, belong. “Pay attention to what I’m doing!”

That Darn Privacy Paradox … Again

Yet there’s a paradox here. “Paying attention to what I’m doing” raises the creep factor. The same survey shows that nearly eight in 10 consumers have at least some concerns about having their digital behaviors tracked, findings that seem to echo greater societal concerns about technology and business, with real branding impact.

Part of the addressable media conundrum comes down to intimacy. My mailbox is outside my door. I have no issues with personalization there, and I expect it. But pop “into” my laptop and now you’re getting closer to how I spend my days and nights — moving between work, play and life. That gets even more pronounced on the most intimate media of all, my smartphone. (I suppose a VR headpiece might be the “what’s-next” level of intimacy — or an embedded chip in my forehead.)

Conflicted as a marketer? Which path does my brand follow?

Revisiting Moments of Truth

One might argue that going from mass marketing to 1:1 marketing is an easier step than going from database marketing to 1:1. I’m reminded of Procter & Gamble’s moments of truth, freshly updated. A brand doesn’t need to know everything I do all day long in order to recognize the critical moments when purchase consideration comes into play. Less in-your-face, more in-the-right moment.

“Delighted, table for one.”

Whether database or 1:1 (or some combination of both), I cannot think of a smarter marketing scenario — one that engages the consumer — that does not depend on data, analysis, insight and action. Even the beefs that consumers have with marketing — remarketing when the product is already bought, not being recognized from one screen to another, for example — are cured by more data (transaction data, graph data, respectively here), not less, and such data being applied in a meaningful way.

“I’ll order the sausage, please. It’s delicious.” (Just don’t tell me how it’s made.)

In this age of transparency, we can no longer hide behind veils of ad tech and algorithms. We must explain what we’re doing with data in plain English. Based on the Selligent Marketing Cloud survey, for most consumers, it seems the path is to tell exactly how data are collected and to serve each as individuals. And we need to be smarter when, where and how ads are deployed even ad professionals are blocking ads today.

As for vital audience data, maybe we should re-think how we explain segmentation to consumers — less about finding “lookalikes” and more about serving “you,” the individual.

Author: Chet Dalzell

Marketing Sustainably: A blog posting questions, opportunities, concerns and observations on sustainability in marketing. Chet Dalzell has 25 years of public relations management and expertise in service to leading brands in consumer, donor, patient and business-to-business markets, and in the field of integrated marketing. He serves on the ANA International ECHO Awards Board of Governors, as an adviser to the Direct Marketing Club of New York, and is senior director, communications and industry relations, with the Digital Advertising Alliance. Chet loves UConn Basketball (men's and women's) and Nebraska Football (that's just men, at this point), too! 

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