The Question Is the Answer

This question and answer format has come to SEO as the featured snippet. These snippets, generated automatically by Google from the organic results, provide users quick answers to their questions. Sample questions that trigger a snippet are: “best chicken and dumplings recipe,” “what to wear to a funeral,” “how to remove a tick” and “when to use a semicolon.”

Unknown peopleFans of the long-running TV show “Jeopardy!” know that contestants must state their answers in the form of a question. Having watched this show many times over the years, it is startling over how many domains of knowledge answers can be stated as questions.

This question and answer format has come to SEO as the featured snippet. These snippets, generated automatically by Google from the organic results, provide users quick answers to their questions. Sample questions that trigger a snippet are: “best chicken and dumplings recipe,” “what to wear to a funeral,” “how to remove a tick” and “when to use a semicolon.” The featured answer snippet includes a direct link to the source and shows up above any of the other organic results. For the SEO, this is new ground to capture.

To be the featured snippet is to achieve a rank 0, so to speak. Is there an advantage to attaining this? How is it accomplished?

Why Have These Featured Snippets Proliferated?

As users migrate to mobile devices with smaller screens, search is changing to meet their needs. Gone is the user sitting at a desktop plowing through link after link for information on “how to remove a tick?” Chances are, the searcher is out on a hike or walking in the lawn and realizes that one of these disease-bearing insects has grabbed onto their body. A quick search on an ever-present phone will yield accurate instructions for the removal.

The rapid growth of voice activated search through Siri, Alexa and Cortana has brought a more conversational tone to search. “Siri, find me the best chicken and dumplings recipe?” These devices will continue to improve and so, too, must search. User behavior will demand it.

When Google first brought out the featured snippet, SEOs thought that it might be little more than a test or would only apply to certain types of information. It is not a test, and as “Jeopardy!” has shown us, a question and answer format can apply to many domains of information. Google has continued to expand the featured snippet with related snippets (headlined as — People also ask) that delve deeper into the topic at hand. Explore these, and you will find that layers and layers of instant information unspool before your eyes.

Is There an Advantage?

When the featured snippet first showed up on search pages, there were concerns that Google was seizing a site’s content, displaying it and removing the impetus for the user to come to the site. Experience has shown that the featured snippet provides an added impetus for the user to click through and get more information. It is as if the user has hit a rich vein of ore and wants dig out more quality information. Sites that are featured enjoy strong traffic generated by the snippets.

How to Be Featured?

How to be featured is the challenge. This is one of the many places where content and SEO must come together. It is dreaming to expect a page with little chance of ranking, mired in Page Four or Five of the search results, to magically pop up in the featured snippets for a competitive keyword question. However, a quick review of top-ranking pages — Page One or so — will give you some idea as to where potential lies. The next step is to generate questions that might fit with the pages. If your pages were built for users to find information, this task should, in fact, come quite easily.

  • Why did you build it?
  • Who did you build it for?
  • When do you expect users to find it?
  • How will they use the page?
  • What benefit will they glean from it?

As you may have noted, each of the phrases above is in the form of a question. It is not hard to generate questions. Then, make sure that the question and its attendant answer are infused into your content and watch the results.

The 1 Simple Way to Sell via Your Webinar

Want to sell with your webinar? Actually go for the close at the end or generate an appointment for your reps to follow-up immediately? Stop wasting the audience’s time with blather about your speaker.

Want to sell with your webinar? Actually go for the close at the end or generate an appointment for your reps to follow-up immediately? Stop wasting the audience’s time with blather about your speaker.

Ok, it will take more I admit. The rest can be done by getting to the point fast and helping your buyer become attracted to the idea of talking more about the itch your speaker just scratched. Here’s a three-step process to getting that done.

You Have the Email but not a Lead
The word webinar itself has a negative connotation. At best it is something your prospects attend while they check email and put out any number of fires. You might argue, “Sure, Molander, but I have the prospects’ email.”

True. But you don’t have them on the way to becoming a lead. You blew it. How? By wasting every single moment from “go.”

It’s time for tough love about your Webinar and the lousy leads it’s sending to sales. Of course, I’ll also offer three simple steps to help produce Webinars that spark customers’ curiosity in what your solution can do for them.

No. 1: Avoid all Introductions Like the Plague
“I find the need to hear the presenters personal story for 10-20 minutes a huge turn off,” says sales coach, Iain Swanson of UK-based Kolzers. “In most cases I have literally switched off and missed the content of the call.”

Enough said. And let’s face it. You’ve probably done the same. Or perhaps you make it habit to join the webinar late in an effort to avoid the irrelevant blather.

This time-wasting tradition needs to stop. Right now. How? NO introductions.

Your potential buyer isn’t attending the webinar to hear about the backgrounds or experiences of the presenter. Nor what the sponsor does, for whom or how well.

They’re there for one reason: To take from you. They want as much as they can get, for free, as possible. Why? They’re human.

Let them take. Let them gorge.

Just structure the way you release the information. Copywrite it. Yes, copywrite it. Scripted? Yes but only for the pros. If you come off as canned you can kiss the leads goodbye.

Start by canning your introduction. Shock your audience by immediately getting to the point. They’ve already qualified the speaker. They’re there, after all.

Brighten their day. Surprise them. Make them think, “WOW, he/she just skipped the boring introduction stuff!”

This is how to sell using Webinars. Trust me, it works.

No. 2: Promise Viewers Something They Don’t Already Know—Then Deliver It Fast, Clearly
Start your webinar by telling prospects, “You’re about to hear information that you probably don’t already know.” Then, follow the Golden Rule of communication. What if prospects already know most of what you’re about to tell them?

You’ve designed the webinar to fail. Just like a whitepaper that looks sharp but is worthless, your Webinar must contain useful information and new know-how, tips or knowledge. If it does not contain enough new information you will not hold the audience.

Build in useful, actionable and fresh information and present it according to the Golden Rule:

  • Tell them what you’re about to tell them (the main insight, short-cut, better way or remedy)
  • Tell them the “better way” (at a high level, yet specific)
  • Tell them what you just told them (come back and remind of the main point)

This approach serves the most essential goal: Getting customers clear on your message. Without clarity your webinar will fail.

Remember the last time you were clear—really clear—on something? Remember how you felt?

Remember the sense of confidence that came with your “ah-ha moment?” You might also recall a feeling of wanting to know more—wanting to have more clarity, more confidence. That’s what we’re after.

That’s your webinar’s job: get buyers crystal clear, confident in themselves and trusting you.

No. 3: Help Them to Want to Know More
When is the last time you attended a Webinar and learned something new? Think about a time when the presenter gave you everything they promised they would at the beginning of the presentation—and more. Did you want more from them? Were you ready to act on that impulse?

Give your best insights, tips or warnings away. Give away all of your best knowledge. All of it.

“But, Jeff, giving prospects my best advice for FREE will help them to do it without me!”

Doubtful. Be careful to not confuse customers qualifying you with what you perceive as their purchase intent.

The act of looking for answers does not always translate to customers’ wanting to do what you charge money for themselves. Even when it does “signal” a customer’s desire to do it themselves, what customers want can change.

You want to be there when it changes.

Most importantly you need to create a craving, deep inside your prospects. A desire to know more details about your big claim, better way, short-cut or system.

The only way to get prospects hungry for more of you is to attract them to the idea of talking to you. Attraction takes a reliable, effective system.

The idea is to structure (copywrite) the content you release in a way that makes asking more questions irresistible to your attendees. Yes, questions can be answered in Q&A. That’s fine. This builds trust and creates more intense curiosity in you—a hunger for more of what you can offer.

But only if you are careful about how you answer those questions.

To get started, present the answers or solutions clearly but in ways that provokes prospects’ curiosity. Answer questions always creates more questions about the details (relating to what you sell).

To create this hunger:

  • Make your words specific, filled with integrity, true and useful
  • Be action-oriented (make your answer clear and easily acted on)
  • But be incomplete (make a credible answer yet leave out most of the details)

Tee-Up Your Call to Action
The idea is to create hunger for a short-cut at the end of your webinar. In other words, the goal of this three-step process is to get prospects hungry for a faster, easier way to get all the details you just spent 40 minutes talking about.

This faster, easier way can be:

  • a lead generation offer
  • your product/service.

The idea is to present content that helps customers begin to desire your lead generation offer. Or at least be primed for the idea of taking action on it.

Making the pitch for viewers to buy at the end of your webinar? Help viewers see buying your product/service as a logical next step in the journey you just started with them.

Using this three-step process transforms what you sell from “something I need to think about buying some day” into “the obvious next step I should take right now.”

Your fee or price tag becomes a logical investment that “feels right, right now.”

Good luck!

Smart Data – Not Big Data

As a concerned data professional, I am already plotting an exit strategy from this Big Data hype. Because like any bubble, it will surely burst. That inevitable doomsday could be a couple of years away, but I can feel it coming. At the risk of sounding too much like Yoda the Jedi Grand Master, all hypes lead to over-investments, all over-investments lead to disappointments, and all disappointments lead to blames. Yes, in a few years, lots of blames will go around, and lots of heads will roll.

As a concerned data professional, I am already plotting an exit strategy from this Big Data hype. Because like any bubble, it will surely burst. That inevitable doomsday could be a couple of years away, but I can feel it coming. At the risk of sounding too much like Yoda the Jedi Grand Master, all hypes lead to over-investments, all over-investments lead to disappointments, and all disappointments lead to blames. Yes, in a few years, lots of blames will go around, and lots of heads will roll.

So, why would I stay on the troubled side? Well, because, for now, this Big Data thing is creating lots of opportunities, too. I am writing this on my way back from Seoul, Korea, where I presented this Big Data idea nine times in just two short weeks, trotting from large venues to small gatherings. Just a few years back, I used to have a hard time explaining what I do for living. Now, I just have to say “Hey, I do this Big Data thing,” and the doors start to open. In my experience, this is the best “Open Sesame” moment for all data specialists. But it will last only if we play it right.

Nonetheless, I also know that I will somehow continue to make living setting data strategies, fixing bad data, designing databases and leading analytical activities, even after the hype cools down. Just with a different title, under a different banner. I’ve seen buzzwords come and go, and this data business has been carried on by the people who cut through each hype (and gargantuan amount of BS along with it) and create real revenue-generating opportunities. At the end of the day (I apologize for using this cliché), it is all about the bottom line, whether it comes from a revenue increase or cost reduction. It is never about the buzzwords that may have created the business opportunities in the first place; it has always been more about the substance that turned those opportunities into money-making machines. And substance needs no fancy title or buzzwords attached to it.

Have you heard Google or Amazon calling themselves a “Big Data” companies? They are the ones with sick amounts of data, but they also know that it is not about the sheer amount of data, but it is all about the user experience. “Wannabes” who are not able to understand the core values often hang onto buzzwords and hypes. As if Big Data, Cloud Computing or coding language du jour will come and save the day. But they are just words.

Even the name “Big Data” is all wrong, as it implies that bigger is always better. The 3 Vs of Big Data—volume, velocity and variety—are also misleading. That could be a meaningful distinction for existing data players, but for decision-makers, it gives a notion that size and speed are the ultimate quest. But for the users, small is better. They don’t have time to analyze big sets of data. They need small answers in fun size packages. Plus, why is big and fast new? Since the invention of modern computers, has there been any year when the processing speed did not get faster and storage capacity did not get bigger?

Lest we forget, it is the software industry that came up with this Big Data thing. It was created as a marketing tagline. We should have read it as, “Yes, we can now process really large amounts of data, too,” not as, “Big Data will make all your dreams come true.” If you are in the business of selling toolsets, of course, that is how you present your product. If guitar companies keep emphasizing how hard it is to be a decent guitar player, would that help their businesses? It is a lot more effective to say, “Hey, this is the same guitar that your guitar hero plays!” But you don’t become Jeff Beck just because you bought a white Fender Stratocaster with a rosewood neck. The real hard work begins “after” you purchase a decent guitar. However, this obvious connection is often lost in the data business. Toolsets never provide solutions on their own. They may make your life easier, but you’d still have to formulate the question in a logical fashion, and still have to make decisions based on provided data. And harnessing meanings out of mounds of data requires training of your mind, much like the way musicians practice incessantly.

So, before business people even consider venturing into this Big Data hype, they should ask themselves “Why data?” What are burning questions that you are trying to solve with the data? If you can’t answer this simple question, then don’t jump into it. Forget about it. Don’t get into it just because everyone else seems to be getting into it. Yeah, it’s a big party, but why are you going there? Besides, if you formulate the question properly, often you will find that you don’t need Big Data all the time. If fact, Big Data can be a terrible detour if your question can be answered by “small” data. But that happens all the time, because people approach their business questions through the processes set by the toolsets. Big Data should be about the business, not about the IT or data.

Smart Data, Not Big Data
So, how do we get over this hype? All too often, perception rules, and a replacement word becomes necessary to summarize the essence of the concept for the general public. In my opinion, “Big Data” should have been “Smart Data.” Piles of unorganized dumb data aren’t worth a damn thing. Imagine a warehouse full of boxes with no labels, collecting dust since 1943. Would you be impressed with the sheer size of the warehouse? Great, the ark that Indiana Jones procured (or did he?) may be stored in there somewhere. But if no one knows where it is—or even if it can be located, if no one knows what to do with it—who cares?

Then, how do data get smarter? Smart data are bite-sized answers to questions. A thousand variables could have been considered to provide the weather forecast that calls for a “70 percent chance of scattered showers in the afternoon,” but that one line that we hear is the smart piece of data. Not the list of all the variables that went into the formula that created that answer. Emphasizing the raw data would be like giving paints and brushes to a person who wants a picture on the wall. As in, “Hey, here are all the ingredients, so why don’t you paint the picture and hang it on the wall?” Unfortunately, that is how the Big Data movement looks now. And too often, even the ingredients aren’t all that great.

I visit many companies only to find that the databases in question are just messy piles of unorganized and unstructured data. And please do not assume that such disarrays are good for my business. I’d rather spend my time harnessing meanings out of data and creating values, not taking care of someone else’s mess all the time. Really smart data are small, concise, clean and organized. Big Data should only be seen in “Behind the Scenes” types of documentaries for manias, not for everyday decision-makers.

I have been already saying that Big Data must get smaller for some time (refer to “Big Data Must Get Smaller“) and I would repeat it until it becomes a movement on its own. The Big Data movement must be about:

  1. Cutting down the noise
  2. Providing the answers

There is too much noise in the data, and cutting it out is the first step toward making the data smaller and smarter. The trouble is that the definition of “noise” is not static. Rock music that I grew up with was certainly a noise to my parents’ generation. In turn, some music that my kids listen to is pure noise to me. Likewise, “product color,” which is essential for a database designed for an inventory management system, may or may not be noise if the goal is to sell more apparel items. In such cases, more important variables could be style, brand, price range, target gender, etc., but color could be just peripheral information at best, or even noise (as in, “Uh, she isn’t going to buy just red shoes all the time?”). How do we then determine the differences? First, set the clear goals (as in, “Why are we playing with the data to begin with?”), define the goals using logical expressions, and let mathematics take care of it. Now you can drop the noise with conviction (even if it may look important to human minds).

If we continue with that mathematical path, we would reach the second part, which is “providing answers to the question.” And the smart answers are in the forms of yes/no, probability figures or some type of scores. Like in the weather forecast example, the question would be “chance of rain on a certain day” and the answer would be “70 percent.” Statistical modeling is not easy or simple, but it is the essential part of making the data smarter, as models are the most effective way to summarize complex and abundant data into compact forms (refer to “Why Model?”).

Most people do not have degrees in mathematics or statistics, but they all know what to do with a piece of information such as “70 percent chance of rain” on the day of a company outing. Some may complain that it is not a definite yes/no answer, but all would agree that providing information in this form is more humane than dumping all the raw data onto users. Sales folks are not necessarily mathematicians, but they would certainly appreciate scores attached to each lead, as in “more or less likely to close.” No, that is not a definite answer, but now sales people can start calling the leads in the order of relative importance to them.

So, all the Big Data players and data scientists must try to “humanize” the data, instead of bragging about the size of the data, making things more complex, and providing irrelevant pieces of raw data to users. Make things simpler, not more complex. Some may think that complexity is their job security, but I strongly disagree. That is a sure way to bring down this Big Data movement to the ground. We are already living in a complex world, and we certainly do not need more complications around us (more on “How to be a good data scientist” in a future article).

It’s About the Users, Too
On the flip side, the decision-makers must change their attitude about the data, as well.

1. Define the goals first: The main theme of this series has been that the Big Data movement is about the business, not IT or data. But I’ve seen too many business folks who would so willingly take a hands-off approach to data. They just fund the database; do not define clear business goals to developers; and hope to God that someday, somehow, some genius will show up and clear up the mess for them. Guess what? That cavalry is never coming if you are not even praying properly. If you do not know what problems you want to solve with data, don’t even get started; you will get to nowhere really slowly, bleeding lots of money and time along the way.

2. Take the data seriously: You don’t have to be a scientist to have a scientific mind. It is not ideal if someone blindly subscribes anything computers spew out (there are lots of inaccurate information in databases; refer to “Not All Databases Are Created Equal.”). But too many people do not take data seriously and continue to follow their gut feelings. Even if your customer profile coming out of a serious analysis does not match with your preconceived notions, do not blindly reject it; instead, treat it as a newly found gold mine. Gut feelings are even more overrated than Big Data.

3. Be logical: Illogical questions do not lead anywhere. There is no toolset that reads minds—at least not yet. Even if we get to have such amazing computers—as seen on “Star Trek” or in other science fiction movies—you would still have to ask questions in a logical fashion for them to be effective. I am not asking decision-makers to learn how to code (or be like Mr. Spock or his loyal follower, Dr. Sheldon Cooper), but to have some basic understanding of logical expressions and try to learn how analysts communicate with computers. This is not data geek vs. non-geek world anymore; we all have to be a little geekier. Knowing Boolean expressions may not be as cool as being able to throw a curve ball, but it is necessary to survive in the age of information overload.

4. Shoot for small successes: Start with a small proof of concept before fully investing in large data initiatives. Even with a small project, one gets to touch all necessary steps to finish the job. Understanding the flow of information is as important as each specific step, as most breakdowns occur in between steps, due to lack of proper connections. There was Gemini program before Apollo missions. Learn how to dock spaceships in space before plotting the chart to the moon. Often, over-investments are committed when the discussion is led by IT. Outsource even major components in the beginning, as the initial goal should be mastering the flow of things.

5. Be buyer-centric: No customer is bound by the channel of the marketer’s choice, and yet, may businesses act exactly that way. No one is an online person just because she did not refuse your email promotions yet (refer to “The Future of Online is Offline“). No buyer is just one dimensional. So get out of brand-, division-, product- or channel-centric mindsets. Even well-designed, buyer-centric marketing databases become ineffective if users are trapped in their channel- or division-centric attitudes, as in “These email promotions must flow!” or “I own this product line!” The more data we collect, the more chances marketers will gain to impress their customers and prospects. Do not waste those opportunities by imposing your own myopic views on them. Big Data movement is not there to fortify marketers’ bad habits. Thanks to the size of the data and speed of machines, we are now capable of disappointing a lot of people really fast.

What Did This Hype Change?
So, what did this Big Data hype change? First off, it changed people’s attitudes about the data. Some are no longer afraid of large amounts of information being thrown at them, and some actually started using them in their decision-making processes. Many realized that we are surrounded by numbers everywhere, not just in marketing, but also in politics, media, national security, health care and the criminal justice system.

Conversely, some people became more afraid—often with good reasons. But even more often, people react based on pure fear that their personal information is being actively exploited without their consent. While data geeks are rejoicing in the age of open source and cloud computing, many more are looking at this hype with deep suspicions, and they boldly reject storing any personal data in those obscure “clouds.” There are some people who don’t even sign up for EZ Pass and voluntarily stay on the long lane to pay tolls in the old, but untraceable way.

Nevertheless, not all is lost in this hype. The data got really big, and types of data that were previously unavailable, such as mobile and social data, became available to many marketers. Focus groups are now the size of Twitter followers of the company or a subject matter. The collection rate of POS (point of service) data has been increasingly steady, and some data players became virtuosi in using such fresh and abundant data to impress their customers (though some crossed that “creepy” line inadvertently). Different types of data are being used together now, and such merging activities will compound the predictive power even further. Analysts are dealing with less missing data, though no dataset would ever be totally complete. Developers in open source environments are now able to move really fast with new toolsets that would just run on any device. Simply, things that our forefathers of direct marketing used to take six months to complete can be done in few hours, and in the near future, maybe within a few seconds.

And that may be a good thing and a bad thing. If we do this right, without creating too many angry consumers and without burning holes in our budgets, we are currently in a position to achieve great many things in terms of predicting the future and making everyone’s lives a little more convenient. If we screw it up badly, we will end up creating lots of angry customers by abusing sensitive data and, at the same time, wasting a whole lot of investors’ money. Then this Big Data thing will go down in history as a great money-eating hype.

We should never do things just because we can; data is a powerful tool that can hurt real people. Do not even get into it if you don’t have a clear goal in terms of what to do with the data; it is not some piece of furniture that you buy just because your neighbor bought it. Living with data is a lifestyle change, and it requires a long-term commitment; it is not some fad that you try once and give up. It is a continuous loop where people’s responses to marketer’s data-based activities create even more data to be analyzed. And that is the only way it keeps getting better.

There Is No Big Data
And all that has nothing to do with “Big.” If done right, small data can do plenty. And in fact, most companies’ transaction data for the past few years would easily fit in an iPhone. It is about what to do with the data, and that goal must be set from a business point of view. This is not just a new playground for data geeks, who may care more for new hip technologies that sound cool in their little circle.

I recently went to Brazil to speak at a data conference called QIBRAS, and I was pleasantly surprised that the main theme of it was the quality of the data, not the size of the data. Well, at least somewhere in the world, people are approaching this whole thing without the “Big” hype. And if you look around, you will not find any successful data players calling this thing “Big Data.” They just deal with small and large data as part of their businesses. There is no buzzword, fanfare or a big banner there. Because when something is just part of your everyday business, you don’t even care what you call it. You just do. And to those masters of data, there is no Big Data. If Google all of a sudden starts calling itself a Big Data company, it would be so uncool, as that word would seriously limit it. Think about that.

Missing Data Can Be Meaningful

No matter how big the Big Data gets, we will never know everything about everything. Well, according to the super-duper computer called “Deep Thought” in the movie “The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy” (don’t bother to watch it if you don’t care for the British sense of humour), the answer to “The Ultimate Question of Life, the Universe, and Everything” is “42.” Coincidentally, that is also my favorite number to bet on (I have my reasons), but I highly doubt that even that huge fictitious computer with unlimited access to “everything” provided that numeric answer with conviction after 7½ million years of computing and checking. At best, that “42” is an estimated figure of a sort, based on some fancy algorithm. And in the movie, even Deep Thought pointed out that “the answer is meaningless, because the beings who instructed it never actually knew what the Question was.” Ha! Isn’t that what I have been saying all along? For any type of analytics to be meaningful, one must properly define the question first. And what to do with the answer that comes out of an algorithm is entirely up to us humans, or in the business world, the decision-makers. (Who are probably human.)

No matter how big the Big Data gets, we will never know everything about everything. Well, according to the super-duper computer called “Deep Thought” in the movie “The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy” (don’t bother to watch it if you don’t care for the British sense of humour), the answer to “The Ultimate Question of Life, the Universe, and Everything” is “42.” Coincidentally, that is also my favorite number to bet on (I have my reasons), but I highly doubt that even that huge fictitious computer with unlimited access to “everything” provided that numeric answer with conviction after 7½ million years of computing and checking. At best, that “42” is an estimated figure of a sort, based on some fancy algorithm. And in the movie, even Deep Thought pointed out that “the answer is meaningless, because the beings who instructed it never actually knew what the Question was.” Ha! Isn’t that what I have been saying all along? For any type of analytics to be meaningful, one must properly define the question first. And what to do with the answer that comes out of an algorithm is entirely up to us humans, or in the business world, the decision-makers. (Who are probably human.)

Analytics is about making the best of what we know. Good analysts do not wait for a perfect dataset (it will never come by, anyway). And businesspeople have no patience to wait for anything. Big Data is big because we digitize everything, and everything that is digitized is stored somewhere in forms of data. For example, even if we collect mobile device usage data from just pockets of the population with certain brands of mobile services in a particular area, the sheer size of the resultant dataset becomes really big, really fast. And most unstructured databases are designed to collect and store what is known. If you flip that around to see if you know every little behavior through mobile devices for “everyone,” you will be shocked to see how small the size of the population associated with meaningful data really is. Let’s imagine that we can describe human beings with 1,000 variables coming from all sorts of sources, out of 200 million people. How many would have even 10 percent of the 1,000 variables filled with some useful information? Not many, and definitely not 100 percent. Well, we have more data than ever in the history of mankind, but still not for every case for everyone.

In my previous columns, I pointed out that decision-making is about ranking different options, and to rank anything properly. We must employee predictive analytics (refer to “It’s All About Ranking“). And for ranking based on the scores resulting from predictive models to be effective, the datasets must be summarized to the level that is to be ranked (e.g., individuals, households, companies, emails, etc.). That is why transaction or event-level datasets must be transformed to “buyer-centric” portraits before any modeling activity begins. Again, it is not about the transaction or the products, but it is about the buyers, if you are doing all this to do business with people.

Trouble with buyer- or individual-centric databases is that such transformation of data structure creates lots of holes. Even if you have meticulously collected every transaction record that matters (and that will be the day), if someone did not buy a certain item, any variable that is created based on the purchase record of that particular item will have nothing to report for that person. Likewise, if you have a whole series of variables to differentiate online and offline channel behaviors, what would the online portion contain if the consumer in question never bought anything through the Web? Absolutely nothing. But in the business of predictive analytics, what did not happen is as important as what happened. Even a simple concept of “response” is only meaningful when compared to “non-response,” and the difference between the two groups becomes the basis for the “response” model algorithm.

Capturing the Meanings Behind Missing Data
Missing data are all around us. And there are many reasons why they are missing, too. It could be that there is nothing to report, as in aforementioned examples. Or, there could be errors in data collection—and there are lots of those, too. Maybe you don’t have access to certain pockets of data due to corporate, legal, confidentiality or privacy reasons. Or, maybe records did not match properly when you tried to merge disparate datasets or append external data. These things happen all the time. And, in fact, I have never seen any dataset without a missing value since I left school (and that was a long time ago). In school, the professors just made up fictitious datasets to emphasize certain phenomena as examples. In real life, databases have more holes than Swiss cheese. In marketing databases? Forget about it. We all make do with what we know, even in this day and age.

Then, let’s ask a philosophical question here:

  • If missing data are inevitable, what do we do about it?
  • How would we record them in databases?
  • Should we just leave them alone?
  • Or should we try to fill in the gaps?
  • If so, how?

The answer to all this is definitely not 42, but I’ll tell you this: Even missing data have meanings, and not all missing data are created equal, either.

Furthermore, missing data often contain interesting stories behind them. For example, certain demographic variables may be missing only for extremely wealthy people and very poor people, as their residency data are generally not exposed (for different reasons, of course). And that, in itself, is a story. Likewise, some data may be missing in certain geographic areas or for certain age groups. Collection of certain types of data may be illegal in some states. “Not” having any data on online shopping behavior or mobile activity may mean something interesting for your business, if we dig deeper into it without falling into the trap of predicting legal or corporate boundaries, instead of predicting consumer behaviors.

In terms of how to deal with missing data, let’s start with numeric data, such as dollars, days, counters, etc. Some numeric data simply may not be there, if there is no associated transaction to report. Now, if they are about “total dollar spending” and “number of transactions” in a certain category, for example, they can be initiated as zero and remain as zero in cases like this. The counter simply did not start clicking, and it can be reported as zero if nothing happened.

Some numbers are incalculable, though. If you are calculating “Average Amount per Online Transaction,” and if there is no online transaction for a particular customer, that is a situation for mathematical singularity—as we can’t divide anything by zero. In such cases, the average amount should be recorded as: “.”, blank, or any value that represents a pure missing value. But it should never be recorded as zero. And that is the key in dealing with missing numeric information; that zero should be reserved for real zeros, and nothing else.

I have seen too many cases where missing numeric values are filled with zeros, and I must say that such a practice is definitely frowned-upon. If you have to pick just one takeaway from this article, that’s it. Like I emphasized, not all missing values are the same, and zero is not the way you record them. Zeros should never represent lack of information.

Take the example of a popular demographic variable, “Number of Children in the Household.” This is a very predictable variable—not just for purchase behavior of children’s products, but for many other things. Now, it is a simple number, but it should never be treated as a simple variable—as, in this case, lack of information is not the evidence of non-existence. Let’s say that you are purchasing this data from a third-party data compiler (or a data broker). If you don’t see a positive number in that field, it could be because:

  1. The household in question really does not have a child;
  2. Even the data-collector doesn’t have the information; or
  3. The data collector has the information, but the household record did not match to the vendor’s record, for some reason.

If that field contains a number like 1, 2 or 3, that’s easy, as they will represent the number of children in that household. But the zero should be reserved for cases where the data collector has a positive confirmation that the household in question indeed does not have any children. If it is unknown, it should be marked as blank, “.” (Many statistical softwares, such as SAS, record missing values this way.) Or use “U” (though an alpha character should not be in a numeric field).

If it is a case of non-match to the external data source, then there should be a separate indicator for it. The fact that the record did not match to a professional data compiler’s list may mean something. And I’ve seen cases where such non-matching indicators are made to model algorithms along with other valid data, as in the case where missing indicators of income display the same directional tendency as high-income households.

Now, if the data compiler in question boldly inputs zeros for the cases of unknowns? Take a deep breath, fire the vendor, and don’t deal with the company again, as it is a sign that its representatives do not know what they are doing in the data business. I have done so in the past, and you can do it, too. (More on how to shop for external data in future articles.)

For non-numeric categorical data, similar rules apply. Some values could be truly “blank,” and those should be treated separately from “Unknown,” or “Not Available.” As a practice, let’s list all kinds of possible missing values in codes, texts or other character fields:

  • ” “—blank or “null”
  • “N/A,” “Not Available,” or “Not Applicable”
  • “Unknown”
  • “Other”—If it is originating from some type of multiple choice survey or pull-down menu
  • “Not Answered” or “Not Provided”—This indicates that the subjects were asked, but they refused to answer. Very different from “Unknown.”
  • “0”—In this case, the answer can be expressed in numbers. Again, only for known zeros.
  • “Non-match”—Not matched to other internal or external data sources
  • Etc.

It is entirely possible that all these values may be highly correlated to each other and move along the same predictive direction. However, there are many cases where they do not. And if they are combined into just one value, such as zero or blank, we will never be able to detect such nuances. In fact, I’ve seen many cases where one or more of these missing indicators move together with other “known” values in models. Again, missing data have meanings, too.

Filling in the Gaps
Nonetheless, missing data do not have to left as missing, blank or unknown all the time. With statistical modeling techniques, we can fill in the gaps with projected values. You didn’t think that all those data compilers really knew the income level of every household in the country, did you? It is not a big secret that much of those figures are modeled with other available data.

Such inferred statistics are everywhere. Popular variables, such as householder age, home owner/renter indicator, housing value, household income or—in the case of business data—the number of employees and sales volume contain modeled values. And there is nothing wrong with that, in the world where no one really knows everything about everything. If you understand the limitations of modeling techniques, it is quite alright to employ modeled values—which are much better alternatives to highly educated guesses—in decision-making processes. We just need to be a little careful, as models often fail to predict extreme values, such as household incomes over $500,000/year, or specific figures, such as incomes of $87,500. But “ranges” of household income, for example, can be predicted at a high confidence level, though it technically requires many separate algorithms and carefully constructed input variables in various phases. But such technicality is an issue that professional number crunchers should deal with, like in any other predictive businesses. Decision-makers should just be aware of the reality of real and inferred data.

Such imputation practices can be applied to any data source, not just compiled databases by professional data brokers. Statisticians often impute values when they encounter missing values, and there are many different methods of imputation. I haven’t met two statisticians who completely agree with each other when it comes to imputation methodologies, though. That is why it is important for an organization to have a unified rule for each variable regarding its imputation method (or lack thereof). When multiple analysts employ different methods, it often becomes the very source of inconsistent or erroneous results at the application stage. It is always more prudent to have the calculation done upfront, and store the inferred values in a consistent manner in the main database.

In terms of how that is done, there could be a long debate among the mathematical geeks. Will it be a simple average of non-missing values? If such a method is to be employed, what is the minimum required fill-rate of the variable in question? Surely, you do not want to project 95 percent of the population with 5 percent known values? Or will the missing values be replaced with modeled values, as in previous examples? If so, what would be the source of target data? What about potential biases that may exist because of data collection practices and their limitations? What should be the target definition? In what kind of ranges? Or should the target definition remain as a continuous figure? How would you differentiate modeled and real values in the database? Would you embed indicators for inferred values? Or would you forego such flags in the name of speed and convenience for users?

The important matter is not the rules or methodologies, but the consistency of them throughout the organization and the databases. That way, all users and analysts will have the same starting point, no matter what the analytical purposes are. There could be a long debate in terms of what methodology should be employed and deployed. But once the dust settles, all data fields should be treated by pre-determined rules during the database update processes, avoiding costly errors in the downstream. All too often, inconsistent imputation methods lead to inconsistent results.

If, by some chance, individual statisticians end up with freedom to come up with their own ways to fill in the blanks, then the model-scoring code in question must include missing value imputation algorithms without an exception, granted that such practice will elongate the model application processes and significantly increase chances for errors. It is also important that non-statistical users should be educated about the basics of missing data and associated imputation methods, so that everyone who has access to the database shares a common understanding of what they are dealing with. That list includes external data providers and partners, and it is strongly recommended that data dictionaries must include employed imputation rules wherever applicable.

Keep an Eye on the Missing Rate
Often, we get to find out that the missing rate of certain variables is going out of control because models become ineffective and campaigns start to yield disappointing results. Conversely, it can be stated that fluctuations in missing data ratios greatly affect the predictive power of models or any related statistical works. It goes without saying that a consistent influx of fresh data matters more than the construction and the quality of models and algorithms. It is a classic case of a garbage-in-garbage-out scenario, and that is why good data governance practices must include a time-series comparison of the missing rate of every critical variable in the database. If, all of a sudden, an important predictor’s fill-rate drops below a certain point, no analyst in this world can sustain the predictive power of the model algorithm, unless it is rebuilt with a whole new set of variables. The shelf life of models is definitely finite, but nothing deteriorates effectiveness of models faster than inconsistent data. And a fluctuating missing rate is a good indicator of such an inconsistency.

Likewise, if the model score distribution starts to deviate from the original model curve from the development and validation samples, it is prudent to check the missing rate of every variable used in the model. Any sudden changes in model score distribution are a good indicator that something undesirable is going on in the database (more on model quality control in future columns).

These few guidelines regarding the treatment of missing data will add more flavors to statistical models and analytics in general. In turn, proper handling of missing data will prolong the predictive power of models, as well. Missing data have hidden meanings, but they are revealed only when they are treated properly. And we need to do that until the day we get to know everything about everything. Unless you are just happy with that answer of “42.”

Big Data Must Get Smaller

Like many folks who worked in the data business for a long time, I don’t even like the words “Big Data.” Yeah, data is big now, I get it. But so what? Faster and bigger have been the theme in the computing business since the first calculator was invented. In fact, I don’t appreciate the common definition of Big Data that is often expressed in the three Vs: volume, velocity and variety. So, if any kind of data are big and fast, it’s all good? I don’t think so. If you have lots of “dumb” data all over the place, how does that help you? Well, as much as all the clutter that’s been piled on in your basement since 1971. It may yield some profit on an online auction site one day. Who knows? Maybe some collector will pay good money for some obscure Coltrane or Moody Blues albums that you never even touched since your last turntable (Ooh, what is that?) died on you. Those oversized album jackets were really cool though, weren’t they?

Like many folks who worked in the data business for a long time, I don’t even like the words “Big Data.” Yeah, data is big now, I get it. But so what? Faster and bigger have been the theme in the computing business since the first calculator was invented. In fact, I don’t appreciate the common definition of Big Data that is often expressed in the three Vs: volume, velocity and variety. So, if any kind of data are big and fast, it’s all good? I don’t think so. If you have lots of “dumb” data all over the place, how does that help you? Well, as much as all the clutter that’s been piled on in your basement since 1971. It may yield some profit on an online auction site one day. Who knows? Maybe some collector will pay good money for some obscure Coltrane or Moody Blues albums that you never even touched since your last turntable (Ooh, what is that?) died on you. Those oversized album jackets were really cool though, weren’t they?

Seriously, the word “Big” only emphasizes the size element, and that is a sure way to miss the essence of the data business. And many folks are missing even that little point by calling all decision-making activities that involve even small-sized data “Big Data.” It is entirely possible that this data stuff seems all new to someone, but the data-based decision-making process has been with us for a very long time. If you use that “B” word to differentiate old-fashioned data analytics of yesteryear and ridiculously large datasets of the present day, yes, that is a proper usage of it. But we all know most people do not mean it that way. One side benefit of this bloated and hyped up buzzword is data professionals like myself do not have to explain what we do for living for 20 minutes anymore by simply uttering the word “Big Data,” though that is a lot like a grandmother declaring all her grandchildren work on computers for living. Better yet, that magic “B” word sometimes opens doors to new business opportunities (or at least a chance to grab a microphone in non-data-related meetings and conferences) that data geeks of the past never dreamed of.

So, I guess it is not all that bad. But lest we forget, all hypes lead to overinvestments, and all overinvestments leads to disappointments, and all disappointments lead to purging of related personnel and vendors that bear that hyped-up dirty word in their titles or division names. If this Big Data stuff does not yield significant profit (or reduction in cost), I am certain that those investment bubbles will burst soon enough. Yes, some data folks may be lucky enough to milk it for another two or three years, but brace for impact if all those collected data do not lead to some serious dollar signs. I know how the storage and processing cost decreased significantly in recent years, but they ain’t totally free, and related man-hours aren’t exactly cheap, either. Also, if this whole data business is a new concept to an organization, any money spent on the promise of Big Data easily becomes a liability for the reluctant bunch.

This is why I open up my speeches and lectures with this question: “Have you made any money with this Big Data stuff yet?” Surely, you didn’t spend all that money to provide faster toys and nicer playgrounds to IT folks? Maybe the head of IT had some fun with it, but let’s ask that question to CFOs, not CTOs, CIOs or CDOs. I know some colleagues (i.e., fellow data geeks) who are already thinking about a new name for this—”decision-making activities, based on data and analytics”—because many of us will be still doing that “data stuff” even after Big Data cease to be cool after the judgment day. Yeah, that Gangnam Style dance was fun for a while, but who still jumps around like a horse?

Now, if you ask me (though nobody did yet), I’d say the Big Data should have been “Smart Data,” “Intelligent Data” or something to that extent. Because data must provide insights. Answers to questions. Guidance to decision-makers. To data professionals, piles of data—especially the ones that are fragmented, unstructured and unformatted, no matter what kind of fancy names the operating system and underlying database technology may bear—it is just a good start. For non-data-professionals, unrefined data—whether they are big or small—would remain distant and obscure. Offering mounds of raw data to end-users is like providing a painting kit when someone wants a picture on the wall. Bragging about the size of the data with impressive sounding new measurements that end with “bytes” is like counting grains of rice in California in front of a hungry man.

Big Data must get smaller. People want yes/no answers to their specific questions. If such clarity is not possible, probability figures to such questions should be provided; as in, “There’s an 80 percent chance of thunderstorms on the day of the company golf outing,” “An above-average chance to close a deal with a certain prospect” or “Potential value of a customer who is repeatedly complaining about something on the phone.” It is about easy-to-understand answers to business questions, not a quintillion bytes of data stored in some obscure cloud somewhere. As I stated at the end of my last column, the Big Data movement should be about (1) Getting rid of the noise, and (2) Providing simple answers to decision-makers. And getting to such answers is indeed the process of making data smaller and smaller.

In my past columns, I talked about the benefits of statistical models in the age of Big Data, as they are the best way to compact big and complex information in forms of simple answers (refer to “Why Model?”). Models built to predict (or point out) who is more likely to be into outdoor sports, to be a risk-averse investor, to go on a cruise vacation, to be a member of discount club, to buy children’s products, to be a bigtime donor or to be a NASCAR fan, are all providing specific answers to specific questions, while each model score is a result of serious reduction of information, often compressing thousands of variables into one answer. That simplification process in itself provides incredible value to decision-makers, as most wouldn’t know where to cut out unnecessary information to answer specific questions. Using mathematical techniques, we can cut down the noise with conviction.

In model development, “Variable Reduction” is the first major step after the target variable is determined (refer to “The Art of Targeting“). It is often the most rigorous and laborious exercise in the whole model development process, where the characteristics of models are often determined as each statistician has his or her unique approach to it. Now, I am not about to initiate a debate about the best statistical method for variable reduction (I haven’t met two statisticians who completely agree with each other in terms of methodologies), but I happened to know that many effective statistical analysts separate variables in terms of data types and treat them differently. In other words, not all data variables are created equal. So, what are the major types of data that database designers and decision-makers (i.e., non-mathematical types) should be aware of?

In the business of predictive analytics for marketing, the following three types of data make up three dimensions of a target individual’s portrait:

  1. Descriptive Data
  2. Transaction Data / Behavioral Data
  3. Attitudinal Data

In other words, if we get to know all three aspects of a person, it will be much easier to predict what the person is about and/or what the person will do. Why do we need these three dimensions? If an individual has a high income and is living in a highly valued home (demographic element, which is descriptive); and if he is an avid golfer (behavioral element often derived from his purchase history), can we just assume that he is politically conservative (attitudinal element)? Well, not really, and not all the time. Sometimes we have to stop and ask what the person’s attitude and outlook on life is all about. Now, because it is not practical to ask everyone in the country about every subject, we often build models to predict the attitudinal aspect with available data. If you got a phone call from a political party that “assumes” your political stance, that incident was probably not random or accidental. Like I emphasized many times, analytics is about making the best of what is available, as there is no such thing as a complete dataset, even in this age of ubiquitous data. Nonetheless, these three dimensions of the data spectrum occupy a unique and distinct place in the business of predictive analytics.

So, in the interest of obtaining, maintaining and utilizing all possible types of data—or, conversely, reducing the size of data with conviction by knowing what to ignore, let us dig a little deeper:

Descriptive Data
Generally, demographic data—such as people’s income, age, number of children, housing size, dwelling type, occupation, etc.—fall under this category. For B-to-B applications, “Firmographic” data—such as number of employees, sales volume, year started, industry type, etc.—would be considered as descriptive data. It is about what the targets “look like” and, generally, they are frozen in the present time. Many prominent data compilers (or data brokers, as the U.S. government calls them) collect, compile and refine the data and make hundreds of variables available to users in various industry sectors. They also fill in the blanks using predictive modeling techniques. In other words, the compilers may not know the income range of every household, but using statistical techniques and other available data—such as age, home ownership, housing value, and many other variables—they provide their best estimates in case of missing values. People often have some allergic reaction to such data compilation practices siting privacy concerns, but these types of data are not about looking up one person at a time, but about analyzing and targeting groups (or segments) of individuals and households. In terms of predictive power, they are quite effective and results are very consistent. The best part is that most of the variables are available for every household in the country, whether they are actual or inferred.

Other types of descriptive data include geo-demographic data, and the Census Data by the U.S. Census Bureau falls under this category. These datasets are organized by geographic denominations such as Census Block Group, Census Tract, Country or ZIP Code Tabulation Area (ZCTA, much like postal ZIP codes, but not exactly the same). Although they are not available on an individual or a household level, the Census data are very useful in predictive modeling, as every target record can be enhanced with it, even when name and address are not available, and data themselves are very stable. The downside is that while the datasets are free through Census Bureau, the raw datasets contain more than 40,000 variables. Plus, due to the budget cut and changes in survey methods during the past decade, the sample size (yes, they sample) decreased significantly, rendering some variables useless at lower geographic denominations, such as Census Block Group. There are professional data companies that narrowed down the list of variables to manageable sizes (300 to 400 variables) and filled in the missing values. Because they are geo-level data, variables are in the forms of percentages, averages or median values of elements, such as gender, race, age, language, occupation, education level, real estate value, etc. (as in, percent male, percent Asian, percent white-collar professionals, average income, median school years, median rent, etc.).

There are many instances where marketers cannot pinpoint the identity of a person due to privacy issues or challenges in data collection, and the Census Data play a role of effective substitute for individual- or household-level demographic data. In predictive analytics, duller variables that are available nearly all the time are often more valuable than precise information with limited availability.

Transaction Data/Behavioral Data
While descriptive data are about what the targets look like, behavioral data are about what they actually did. Often, behavioral data are in forms of transactions. So many just call it transaction data. What marketers commonly refer to as RFM (Recency, Frequency and Monetary) data fall under this category. In terms of predicting power, they are truly at the top of the food chain. Yes, we can build models to guess who potential golfers are with demographic data, such as age, gender, income, occupation, housing value and other neighborhood-level information, but if you get to “know” that someone is a buyer of a box of golf balls every six weeks or so, why guess? Further, models built with transaction data can even predict the nature of future purchases, in terms of monetary value and frequency intervals. Unfortunately, many who have access to RFM data are using them only in rudimentary filtering, as in “select everyone who spends more than $200 in a gift category during the past 12 months,” or something like that. But we can do so much more with rich transaction data in every stage of the marketing life cycle for prospecting, cultivating, retaining and winning back.

Other types of behavioral data include non-transaction data, such as click data, page views, abandoned shopping baskets or movement data. This type of behavioral data is getting a lot of attention as it is truly “big.” The data have been out of reach for many decision-makers before the emergence of new technology to capture and store them. In terms of predictability, nevertheless, they are not as powerful as real transaction data. These non-transaction data may provide directional guidance, as they are what some data geeks call “a-camera-on-everyone’s-shoulder” type of data. But we all know that there is a clear dividing line between people’s intentions and their commitments. And it can be very costly to follow every breath you take, every move you make, and every step you take. Due to their distinct characteristics, transaction data and non-transaction data must be managed separately. And if used together in models, they should be clearly labeled, so the analysts will never treat them the same way by accident. You really don’t want to mix intentions and commitments.

The trouble with the behavioral data are, (1) they are difficult to compile and manage, (2) they get big; sometimes really big, (3) they are generally confined within divisions or companies, and (4) they are not easy to analyze. In fact, most of the examples that I used in this series are about the transaction data. Now, No. 3 here could be really troublesome, as it equates to availability (or lack thereof). Yes, you may know everything that happened with your customers, but do you know where else they are shopping? Fortunately, there are co-op companies that can answer that question, as they are compilers of transaction data across multiple merchants and sources. And combined data can be exponentially more powerful than data in silos. Now, because transaction data are not always available for every person in databases, analysts often combine behavioral data and descriptive data in their models. Transaction data usually become the dominant predictors in such cases, while descriptive data play the supporting roles filling in the gaps and smoothing out the predictive curves.

As I stated repeatedly, predictive analytics in marketing is all about finding out (1) whom to engage, and (2) if you decided to engage someone, what to offer to that person. Using carefully collected transaction data for most of their customers, there are supermarket chains that achieved 100 percent customization rates for their coupon books. That means no two coupon books are exactly the same, which is a quite impressive accomplishment. And that is all transaction data in action, and it is a great example of “Big Data” (or rather, “Smart Data”).

Attitudinal Data
In the past, attitudinal data came from surveys, primary researches and focus groups. Now, basically all social media channels function as gigantic focus groups. Through virtual places, such as Facebook, Twitter or other social media networks, people are freely volunteering what they think and feel about certain products and services, and many marketers are learning how to “listen” to them. Sentiment analysis falls under that category of analytics, and many automatically think of this type of analytics when they hear “Big Data.”

The trouble with social data is:

  1. We often do not know who’s behind the statements in question, and
  2. They are in silos, and it is not easy to combine such data with transaction or demographic data, due to lack of identity of their sources.

Yes, we can see that a certain political candidate is trending high after an impressive speech, but how would we connect that piece of information to whom will actually donate money for the candidate’s causes? If we can find out “where” the target is via an IP address and related ZIP codes, we may be able to connect the voter to geo-demographic data, such as the Census. But, generally, personally identifiable information (PII) is only accessible by the data compilers, if they even bothered to collect them.

Therefore, most such studies are on a macro level, citing trends and directions, and types of analysts in that field are quite different from the micro-level analysts who deal with behavioral data and descriptive data. Now, the former provide important insights regarding the “why” part of the equation, which is often the hardest thing to predict; while the latter provide answers to “who, what, where and when.” (“Who” is the easiest to answer, and “when” is the hardest.) That “why” part may dictate a product development part of the decision-making process at the conceptual stage (as in, “Why would customers care for a new type of dishwasher?”), while “who, what, where and when” are more about selling the developed products (as in “Let’s sell those dishwashers in the most effective ways.”). So, it can be argued that these different types of data call for different types of analytics for different cycles in the decision-making processes.

Obviously, there are more types of data out there. But for marketing applications dealing with humans, these three types of data complete the buyers’ portraits. Now, depending on what marketers are trying to do with the data, they can prioritize where to invest first and what to ignore (for now). If they are early in the marketing cycle trying to develop a new product for the future, they need to understand why people want something and behave in certain ways. If signing up as many new customers as possible is the immediate goal, finding out who and where the ideal prospects are becomes the most imminent task. If maximizing the customer value is the ongoing objective, then you’d better start analyzing transaction data more seriously. If preventing attrition is the goal, then you will have to line up the transaction data in time series format for further analysis.

The business goals must dictate the analytics, and the analytics call for specific types of data to meet the goals, and the supporting datasets should be in “analytics-ready” formats. Not the other way around, where businesses are dictated by the limitations of analytics, and analytics are hampered by inadequate data clutters. That type of business-oriented hierarchy should be the main theme of effective data management, and with clear goals and proper data strategy, you will know where to invest first and what data to ignore as a decision-maker, not necessarily as a mathematical analyst. And that is the first step toward making the Big Data smaller. Don’t be impressed by the size of the data, as they often blur the big picture and not all data are created equal.

Chicken or the Egg? Data or Analytics?

I just saw an online discussion about the role of a chief data officer, whether it should be more about data or analytics. My initial response to that question is “neither.” A chief data officer must represent the business first.

I just saw an online discussion about the role of a chief data officer, whether it should be more about data or analytics. My initial response to that question is “neither.” A chief data officer must represent the business first. And I had the same answer when such a title didn’t even exist and CTOs or other types of executives covered that role in data-rich environments. As soon as an executive with a seemingly technical title starts representing the technology, that business is doomed. (Unless, of course, the business itself is about having fun with the technology. How nice!)

Nonetheless, if I really have to pick just one out of the two choices, I would definitely pick the analytics over data, as that is the key to providing answers to business questions. Data and databases must be supporting that critical role of analytics, not the other way around. Unfortunately, many organizations are completely backward about it, where analysts are confined within the limitations of database structures and affiliated technologies, and the business owners and decision-makers are dictated to by the analysts and analytical tool sets. It should be the business first, then the analytics. And all databases—especially marketing databases—should be optimized for analytical activities.

In my previous columns, I talked about the importance of marketing databases and statistical modeling in the age of Big Data; not all depositories of information are necessarily marketing databases, and statistical modeling is the best way to harness marketing answers out of mounds of accumulated data. That begs for the next question: Is your marketing database model-ready?

When I talk about the benefits of statistical modeling in data-rich environments (refer to my previous column titled “Why Model?”), I often encounter folks who list reasons why they do not employ modeling as part of their normal marketing activities. If I may share a few examples here:

  • Target universe is too small: Depending on the industry, the prospect universe and customer base are sometimes very small in size, so one may decide to engage everyone in the target group. But do you know what to offer to each of your prospects? Customized offers should be based on some serious analytics.
  • Predictive data not available: This may have been true years back, but not in this day and age. Either there is a major failure in data collection, or collected data are too unstructured to yield any meaningful answers. Aren’t we living in the age of Big Data? Surely we should all dig deeper.
  • 1-to-1 marketing channels not in plan: As I repeatedly said in my previous columns, “every” channel is, or soon will be, a 1-to-1 channel. Every audience is secretly screaming, “Entertain us!” And customized customer engagement efforts should be based on modeling, segmentation and profiling.
  • Budget doesn’t allow modeling: If the budget is too tight, a marketer may opt in for some software solution instead of hiring a team of statisticians. Remember that cookie-cutter models out of software packages are still better than someone’s intuitive selection rules (i.e., someone’s “gut” feeling).
  • The whole modeling process is just too painful: Hmm, I hear you. The whole process could be long and difficult. Now, why do you think it is so painful?

Like a good doctor, a consultant should be able to identify root causes based on pain points. So let’s hear some complaints:

  • It is not easy to find “best” customers for targeting
  • Modelers are fixing data all the time
  • Models end up relying on a few popular variables, anyway
  • Analysts are asking for more data all the time
  • It takes too long to develop and implement models
  • There are serious inconsistencies when models are applied to the database
  • Results are disappointing
  • Etc., etc…

I often get called in when model-based marketing efforts yield disappointing results. More often than not, the opening statement in such meetings is that “The model did not work.” Really? What is interesting is that in more than nine times out of 10 cases like that, the models are the only elements that seem to have been done properly. Everything else—from pre-modeling steps, such as data hygiene, conversion, categorization, and summarization; to post-modeling steps, such as score application and validation—often turns out to be the root cause of all the troubles, resulting in pain points listed here.

When I speak at marketing conferences, talking about this subject of this “model-ready” environment, I always ask if there are statisticians and analysts in the audience. Then I ask what percentage of their time goes into non-statistical activities, such as data preparation and remedying data errors. The absolute majority of them say they spend of 80 percent to 90 percent of their time fixing the data, devoting the rest to the model development work. You don’t need me to tell you that something is terribly wrong with this picture. And I am pretty sure that none of those analysts got their PhDs and master’s degrees in statistics to spend most of their waking hours fixing the data. Yeah, I know from experience that, in this data business, the last guy who happens to touch the dataset always ends up being responsible for all errors made to the file thus far, but still. No wonder it is often quoted that one of the key elements of being a successful data scientist is the programming skill.

When you provide datasets filled with unstructured, incomplete and/or missing data, diligent analysts will devote their time to remedying the situation and making the best out of what they have received. I myself often tell newcomers that analytics is really about making the best of what you’ve got. The trouble is that such data preparation work calls for a different set of skills that have nothing to do with statistics or analytics, and most analysts are not that great at programming, nor are they trained for it.

Even if they were able to create a set of sensible variables to play with, here comes the bigger trouble; what they have just fixed is just a “sample” of the database, when the models must be applied to the whole thing later. Modern databases often contain hundreds of millions of records, and no analyst in his or her right mind uses the whole base to develop any models. Even if the sample is as large as a few million records (an overkill, for sure) that would hardly be the entire picture. The real trouble is that no model is useful unless the resultant model scores are available on every record in the database. It is one thing to fix a sample of a few hundred thousand records. Now try to apply that model algorithm to 200 million entries. You see all those interesting variables that analysts created and fixed in the sample universe? All that should be redone in the real database with hundreds of millions of lines.

Sure, it is not impossible to include all the instructions of variable conversion, reformat, edit and summarization in the model-scoring program. But such a practice is the No. 1 cause of errors, inconsistencies and serious delays. Yes, it is not impossible to steer a car with your knees while texting with your hands, but I wouldn’t call that the best practice.

That is why marketing databases must be model-ready, where sampling and scoring become a routine with minimal data transformation. When I design a marketing database, I always put the analysts on top of the user list. Sure, non-statistical types will still be able to run queries and reports out of it, but those activities should be secondary as they are lower-level functions (i.e., simpler and easier) compared to being “model-ready.”

Here is list of prerequisites of being model-ready (which will be explained in detail in my future columns):

  • All tables linked or merged properly and consistently
  • Data summarized to consistent levels such as individuals, households, email entries or products (depending on the ranking priority by the users)
  • All numeric fields standardized, where missing data and zero values are separated
  • All categorical data edited and categorized according to preset business rules
  • Missing data imputed by standardized set of rules
  • All external data variables appended properly

Basically, the whole database should be as pristine as the sample datasets that analysts play with. That way, sampling should take only a few seconds, and applying the resultant model algorithms to the whole base would simply be the computer’s job, not some nerve-wrecking, nail-biting, all-night baby-sitting suspense for every update cycle.

In my co-op database days, we designed and implemented the core database with this model-ready philosophy, where all samples were presented to the analysts on silver platters, with absolutely no need for fixing the data any further. Analysts devoted their time to pondering target definitions and statistical methodologies. This way, each analyst was able to build about eight to 10 “custom” models—not cookie-cutter models—per “day,” and all models were applied to the entire database with more than 200 million individuals at the end of each day (I hear that they are even more efficient these days). Now, for the folks who are accustomed to 30-day model implementation cycle (I’ve seen as long as 6-month cycles), this may sound like a total science fiction. And I am not even saying that all companies need to build and implement that many models every day, as that would hardly be a core business for them, anyway.

In any case, this type of practice has been in use way before the words “Big Data” were even uttered by anyone, and I would say that such discipline is required even more desperately now. Everyone is screaming for immediate answers for their questions, and the questions should be answered in forms of model scores, which are the most effective and concise summations of all available data. This so-called “in-database” modeling and scoring practice starts with “model-ready” database structure. In the upcoming issues, I will share the detailed ways to get there.

So, here is the answer for the chicken-or-the-egg question. It is the business posing the questions first and foremost, then the analytics providing answers to those questions, where databases are optimized to support such analytical activities including predictive modeling. For the chicken example, with the ultimate goal of all living creatures being procreation of their species, I’d say eggs are just a means to that end. Therefore, for a business-minded chicken, yeah, definitely the chicken before the egg. Not that I’ve seen too many logical chickens.

Why Model?

Why model? Uh, because someone is ridiculously good looking, like Derek Zoolander? No, seriously, why model when we have so much data around? The short answer is because we will never know the whole truth. That would be the philosophical answer. Physicists construct models to make new quantum field theories more attractive theoretically and more testable physically. If a scientist already knows the secrets of the universe, well, then that person is on a first-name basis with God Almighty, and he or she doesn’t need any models to describe things like particles or strings. And the rest of us should just hope the scientist isn’t one of those evil beings in “Star Trek.”

Why model? Uh, because someone is ridiculously good looking, like Derek Zoolander? No, seriously, why model when we have so much data around?

The short answer is because we will never know the whole truth. That would be the philosophical answer. Physicists construct models to make new quantum field theories more attractive theoretically and more testable physically. If a scientist already knows the secrets of the universe, well, then that person is on a first-name basis with God Almighty, and he or she doesn’t need any models to describe things like particles or strings. And the rest of us should just hope the scientist isn’t one of those evil beings in “Star Trek.”

Another answer to “why model?” is because we don’t really know the future, not even the immediate future. If some object is moving toward a certain direction at a certain velocity, we can safely guess where it will end up in one hour. Then again, nothing in this universe is just one-dimensional like that, and there could be a snowstorm brewing up on its path, messing up the whole trajectory. And that weather “forecast” that predicted the snowstorm is a result of some serious modeling, isn’t it?

What does all this mean for the marketers who are not necessarily masters of mathematics, statistics or theoretical physics? Plenty, actually. And the use of models in marketing goes way back to the days of punch cards and mainframes. If you are too young to know what those things are, well, congratulations on your youth, and let’s just say that it was around the time when humans first stepped on the moon using a crude rocket ship equipped with less computing power than an inexpensive passenger car of the modern days.

Anyhow, in that ancient time, some smart folks in the publishing industry figured that they would save tons of money if they could correctly “guess” who the potential buyers were “before” they dropped any expensive mail pieces. Even with basic regression models—and they only had one or two chances to get it right with glacially slow tools before the all-too-important Christmas season came around every year—they could safely cut the mail quantity by 80 percent to 90 percent. The savings added up really fast by not talking to everyone.

Fast-forward to the 21st Century. There is still a beauty of knowing who the potential buyers are before we start engaging anyone. As I wrote in my previous columns, analytics should answer:

1. To whom you should be talking; and
2. What you should offer once you’ve decided to engage someone.

At least the first part will be taken care of by knowing who is more likely to respond to you.

But in the days when the cost of contacting a person through various channels is dropping rapidly, deciding to whom to talk can’t be the only reason for all this statistical work. Of course not. There are plenty more reasons why being a statistician (or a data scientist, nowadays) is one of the best career choices in this century.

Here is a quick list of benefits of employing statistical models in marketing. Basically, models are constructed to:

  • Reduce cost by contacting prospects more wisely
  • Increase targeting accuracy
  • Maintain consistent results
  • Reveal hidden patterns in data
  • Automate marketing procedures by being more repeatable
  • Expand the prospect universe while minimizing the risk
  • Fill in the gaps and summarize complex data into an easy-to-use format—A must in the age of Big Data
  • Stay relevant to your customers and prospects

We talked enough about the first point, so let’s jump to the second one. It is hard to argue about the “targeting accuracy” part, though there still are plenty of non-believers in this day and age. Why are statistical models more accurate than someone’s gut feeling or sheer guesswork? Let’s just say that in my years of dealing with lots of smart people, I have not met anyone who can think about more than two to three variables at the same time, not to mention potential interactions among them. Maybe some are very experienced in using RFM and demographic data. Maybe they have been reasonably successful with choices of variables handed down to them by their predecessors. But can they really go head-to-head against carefully constructed statistical models?

What is a statistical model, and how is it built? In short, a model is a mathematical expression of “differences” between dichotomous groups. Too much of a mouthful? Just imagine two groups of people who do not overlap. They may be buyers vs. non-buyers; responders vs. non-responders; credit-worthy vs. not-credit-worthy; loyal customers vs. attrition-bound, etc. The first step in modeling is to define the target, and that is the most important step of all. If the target is hanging in the wrong place, you will be shooting at the wrong place, no matter how good your rifle is.

And the target should be expressed in mathematical terms, as computers can’t read our minds, not just yet. Defining the target is a job in itself:

  • If you’re going after frequent flyers, how frequent is frequent enough for you? Five times a year or 10 times a year? Or somewhere in between? Or should it remain continuous?
  • What if the target is too small or too large? What then?
  • If you are looking for more valuable prospects, how would you express that? In terms of average spending, lifetime spending or sheer number of transactions?
  • What if there is an inverse relationship between frequency and dollar spending (i.e., high spenders shopping infrequently)?
  • And what would be the borderline number to be “valuable” in all this?

Once the target is set, after much pondering, then the job is to select the variables that describe the “differences” between the two groups. For example, I know how much marketers love to use income variables in various situations. But if that popular variable does not explain the differences between the two groups (target and non-target), the mathematics will mercilessly throw it out. This rigorous exercise of examining hundreds or even thousands of variables is one of the most critical steps, during which many variables go through various types of transformations. Statisticians have different preferences in terms of ideal numbers of variables in a model, while non-statisticians like us don’t need to be too concerned, as long as the resultant model works. Who cares if a cat is white or black, as long as it catches mice?

Not all selected variables are equally important in model algorithms, either. More powerful variables will be assigned with higher weight, and the sum of these weighted values is what we call model score. Now, non-statisticians who have been slightly allergic to math since the third grade only need to know that the higher the score, the more likely the record in question is to be like the target. To make the matter even simpler, let’s just say that you want higher scores over lower scores. If you are a salesperson, just call the high-score prospects first. And would you care how many variables are packed into that score, for as long as you get the good “Glengarry Glen Ross” leads on top?

So, let me ask again. Does this sound like something a rudimentary selection rule with two to three variables can beat when it comes to identifying the right target? Maybe someone can get lucky once or twice, but not consistently.

That leads to the next point, “consistency.” Because models do not rely on a few popular variables, they are far less volatile than simple selection rules or queries. In this age of Big Data, there are more transaction and behavioral data in the mix than ever, and they are far more volatile than demographic and geo-demographic data. Put simply, people’s purchasing behavior and preferences change much faster than family composition or their income, and that volatility factor calls for more statistical work. Plus, all facets of marketing are now more about measurable results (ah, that dreaded ROI, or “Roy,” the way I call it), and the businesses call for consistent hitters over one-hit wonders.

“Revealing hidden patterns in data” is my favorite. When marketers are presented with thousands of variables, I see a majority of them just sticking to a few popular ones all the time. Some basic recency and frequency data are there, and among hundreds of demographic variables, the list often stops after income, age, gender, presence of children, and some regional variables. But seriously, do you think that the difference between a luxury car buyer and an SUV buyer is just income and age? You see, these variables are just the ones that human minds are accustomed to. Mathematics do not have such preconceived notions. Sticking to a few popular variables is like children repeatedly using three favorite colors out of a whole box of crayons.

I once saw a neighborhood-level U.S. Census variable called “% Households with Septic Tanks” in a model built for a high-end furniture catalog. Really, the variable was “percentage of houses with septic tanks in the neighborhood.” Then I realized it made a lot of sense. That variable was revealing how far away that neighborhood was located in comparison to populous city centers. As the percentage of septic tanks increased, the further away the residents were from the city center. And maybe those folks who live in scarcely populated areas were more likely to shop for furniture through catalogs than the folks who live closer to commercial areas.

This is where we all have that “aha” moment. But you and I will never pick that variable in anything that we do, not in million years, no matter how effective it may be in finding the target prospects. The word “septic” may scare some people off at “hello.” In any case, modeling procedures reveal hidden connections like that all of the time, and that is a very important function in data-rich environments. Otherwise, we will not know what to throw out without fear, and the databases will continuously become larger and more unusable.

Moving on to the next points, “Repeatable” and “Expandable” are somewhat related. Let’s say a marketer has been using a very innovative selection logic that she came across almost by accident. In pursuing special types of wealthy people, she stumbled upon a piece of data called “owner of swimming pool.” Now, she may have even had a few good runs with it, too. But eventually, that success will lead to the question of:

1. Having to repeat that success again and again; and
2. Having to expand that universe, when the “known” universe of swimming pool owners become depleted or saturated.

Ah, the chagrin of a one-hit-wonder begins.

Use of statistical models, with help of multiple variables and scalable scoring, would avoid all of those issues. You want to expand the prospect universe? No trouble. Just dial down the scores on the scale a little further. We can even measure the risk of reaching into the lower-scoring groups. And you don’t have to worry about coverage issues related to a few variables, as those won’t be the only ones in the model. Want to automate the selection process? No problem there, as using a score, which is a summary of key predictors, is far simpler than having to carry a long list of data variables into any automated system.

Now, that leads to the next point, “Filling in the gaps and summarizing the complex data into an easy-to-use format.” In the age of ubiquitous and “Big” data, this is the single-most important point, way beyond the previous examples for traditional 1-to-1 marketing applications. We are definitely going through massive data overloads everywhere, and someone better refine the data and provide some usable answers.

As I mentioned earlier, we build models because we will never know the whole truth. I believe that the Big Data movement should be all about:

1. Filtering the noise from valuable information; and
2. Filling the gaps.

“Gaps,” you say? Believe me, there are plenty of gaps in any dataset, big or small.

When information continues to get piled on, the resultant database may look big. And they are physically large. But in marketing, as I repeatedly emphasized in my previous columns, the data must be realigned to “buyer-centric” formats, with every data point describing each individual, as marketing is all about people.

Sure, you may have tons of mobile phone-related data. In fact, it could be quite huge in size. But let me turn that upside down for you (more like sideways-up, in practice). Now, try to describe everyone in your footprint in terms of certain activities. Say, “every smart phone owner who used more than 80 percent of his or her monthly data allowance on the average for the past 12 months, regardless of the carrier.” Hey, don’t blame me for asking these questions just because it’s inconvenient for data handlers to answer them. Some marketers would certainly benefit from information like that, and no one cares about just bits and pieces of data, other than for some interesting tidbits at a party.

Here’s the main trouble when you start asking buyer-related questions like that. Once we try to look at the world from the “buyer-centric” point of view, we will realize there are tons of missing data (i.e., a whole bunch of people with not much information). It may be that you will never get this kind of data from all carriers. Maybe not everyone is tracked this way. In terms of individuals, you may end up with less than 10 percent in the database with mobile information attached to them. In fact, many interesting variables may have less than 1 percent coverage. Holes are everywhere in so-called Big Data.

Models can fill in those blanks for you. For all those data compilers who sell age and income data for every household in the country, do you believe that they really “know” everyone’s age and income? A good majority of the information is based on carefully constructed models. And there is nothing wrong with that.

If you don’t get to “know” something, we can get to a “likelihood” score—of “being like” that something. And in that world, every measurement is on a scale, with no missing values. For example, the higher the score of a model built for a telecommunication company, the more likely that the prospect is going to use a high-speed data plan, or the international long distance services, depending on the purpose of the model. Or the more likely the person will buy sports packages via cable or satellite. Or the person is more likely to subscribe to premium movie channels. Etc., etc. With scores like these, a marketer can initiate the conversation with—not just talking to—a particular prospect with customized product packages in his hand.

And that leads us to the final point in all this, “Staying relevant to your customers and prospects.” That is what Big Data should be all about—at least for us marketers. We know plenty about a lot of people. And they are asking us why we are still so random about marketing messages. With all these data that are literally floating around, marketers can do so much better. But not without statistical models that fill in the gaps and turn pieces of data into marketing-ready answers.

So, why model? Because a big pile of information doesn’t provide answers on its own, and that pile has more holes than Swiss cheese if you look closely. That’s my final answer.

Cheat Sheet: Is Your Database Marketing Ready?

Many data-related projects end up as big disappointments. And, in many cases, it is because they did not have any design philosophy behind them. Because many folks are more familiar with buildings and cars than geeky databases, allow me to use them as examples here.

Many data-related projects end up as big disappointments. And, in many cases, it is because they did not have any design philosophy behind them. Because many folks are more familiar with buildings and cars than geeky databases, allow me to use them as examples here.

Imagine someone started constructing a building without a clear purpose. What is it going to be? An office building or a residence? If residential, for how many people? For a family, or for 200 college kids? Are they going to just eat and sleep in there, or are they going to engage in other activities in it? What is the budget for development and ongoing maintenance?

If someone starts building a house without answering these basic questions, well, it is safe to say that the guy who commissioned such a project is not in the right state of mind. Then again, he may be a filthy rich rock star with some crazy ideas. But let us just say that is an exceptional case. Nonetheless, surprisingly, a great many database projects start out exactly this way.

Just like a house is not just a sum of bricks, mortar and metal, a database is not just a sum of data, and there has to be design philosophy behind it. And yet, many companies think that putting all available data in one place is just good enough. Call it a movie without a director or a building without an architect; you know and I know that such a project cannot end well.

Even when a professional database designer gets involved, too often the project goes out of control—as the business requirement document ends up being a summary of
everyone’s wish lists, without any prioritization or filtering. It is a case of a movie without a director. The goal becomes something like “a database that stores all conceivable marketing, accounting and payment activities, handling both prospecting and customer relationship management through all conceivable channels, including face-to-face sales and lead management for big accounts. And it should include both domestic and international activities, and the update has to be done in real time.”

Really. Someone in that organization must have attended a database marketing conference recently to get all that listed. It might be simpler and cheaper building a 2-ton truck that flies. But before we commission something like this from the get-go, shall we discuss why the truck has to fly, too? For one, if you want real-time updates, do you have a business case for it? (As in, someone in the field must make real-time decisions with real-time data.) Or do you just fancy a large object, moving really fast?

Companies that primarily sell database tools often do not help the matter, either. Some promise that the tool sets will categorize all kinds of input data, based on some auto-generated meta-tables. (Really?) The tool will clean the data automatically. (Is it a self-cleaning oven?) The tool will establish key links (by what?), build models on its own (with what target data?), deploy campaigns (every Monday?), and conduct result analysis (with responses from all channels?).

All these capabilities sound really wonderful, but does that system set long- and short-term marketing goals for you, too? Does it understand the subtle nuances in human behaviors and intentions?

Sorry for being a skeptic here. But in such cases, I think someone watched “Star Trek” too much. I have never seen a company that does not regret spending seven figures on a tool set that was supposed to do everything. Do you wonder why? It is not because such activities cannot be automated, but because:

  1. Machines do not think for us (not quite yet); and
  2. Such a system is often very expensive, as it needs to cover all contingencies (the opposite of “goal-oriented” cheaper options).

So it becomes nearly impossible to justify the cost with incremental improvements in marketing efficiency. Even if the response rates double, all related marketing costs go down by a quarter, and revenue jumps up by 200 percent, there are not many companies that can easily justify that kind of spending.

Worse yet, imagine that you just paid 10 times more for some factory-made suit than you would have paid for a custom-made Italian suit. Since when is an automated, cookie-cutter answer more desirable than custom-tailored ones? Ever since computing and storage costs started to go down significantly, and more so in this age of Big Data that has an “everything, all the time” mentality.

But let me ask you again: Do you really have a marketing database?

Let us just say that I am a car designer. A potential customer who has been doing a lot of research on the technology front presents me with a spec for a vehicle that is as big as a tractor-trailer and as quick as a passenger car. I guess that someone really needs to move lots of stuff, really fast. Now, let us assume that it will cost about $8 million or more to build a car like that, and that estimate is without the rocket booster (ah, my heart breaks). If my business model is to take a percentage out of that budget, I would say, “Yeah sure, we can build a car like that for you. When can we start?”

But let us stop for a moment and ask why the client would “need” (not “want”) a car like that in the first place. After some user interviews and prioritization, we may collectively conclude that a fleet of full-size vans can satisfy 98 percent of the business needs, saving about $7 million. If that client absolutely and positively has to get to that extra 2 percent to satisfy every possible contingency in his business and spend that money, well, that is his prerogative, is it not? But I have to ask the business questions first before initiating that inevitable long and winding journey without a roadmap.

Knowing exactly what the database is supposed to be doing must be the starting point. Not “let’s just gather everything in one place and hope to God that some user will figure something out eventually.” Also, let’s not forget that constantly adding new goals in any phase of the project will inevitably complicate the matter and increase the cost.

Conversely, repurposing a database designed for some other goal will cause lots of troubles down the line. Yeah, sure. Is it not possible to move 100 people from A to B with a 2-seater sports car, if you are willing to make lots of quick trips and get some speeding tickets along the way? Yes, but that would not be my first recommendation. Instead, here are some real possibilities.

Databases support many different types of activities. So let us name a few:

  • Order fulfillment
  • Inventory management and accounting
  • Contact management for sales
  • Dashboard and report generation
  • Queries and selections
  • Campaign management
  • Response analysis
  • Trend analysis
  • Predictive modeling and scoring
  • Etc., etc.

The list goes on, and some of the databases may be doing fine jobs in many areas already. But can we safely call them “marketing” databases? Or are marketers simply tapping into the central data depository somehow, just making do with lots of blood, sweat and tears?

As an exercise, let me ask a few questions to see if your organization has a functioning marketing database for CRM purposes:

  • What is the average order size per year for customers with tenure of more than one year? —You may have all the transaction data, but maybe not on an individual level in order to know the average.
  • What is the number of active and dormant customers based on the last transaction date? —You will be surprised to find out that many companies do not know exactly how many customers they really have. Beep! 1 million-“ish” is not a good answer.
  • What is the average number of days between activities for each channel for each customer? —With basic transaction data summarized “properly,” this is not a difficult question to answer. But it’s very difficult if there are divisional “channel-centric” databases scattered all over.
  • What is the average number of touches through all channels that you employ before your customer reaches the projected value potential? —This is a hard one. Without all the transaction and contact history by all channels in a “closed-loop” structure, one cannot even begin to formulate an answer for this one. And the “value potential” is a result of statistical modeling, is it not?
  • What are typical gateway products, and how are they correlated to other product purchases? —This may sound like a product question, but without knowing each customer’s purchase history lined up properly with fully standardized product categories, it may take a while to figure this one out.
  • Are basic RFM data—such as dollars, transactions, dates and intervals—routinely being used in predictive models? —The answer is a firm “no,” if the statisticians are spending the majority of their time fixing the data; and “not even close,” if you are still just using RFM data for rudimentary filtering.

Now, if your answer is “Well, with some data summarization and inner/outer joins here and there—though we don’t have all transaction records from last year, and if we can get all the campaign histories from all seven vendors who managed our marketing campaigns, except for emails—maybe?”, then I am sorry to inform you that you do not have a marketing database. Even if you can eventually get to the answer if some programmer takes two weeks to draw a 7-page flow chart.

Often, I get extra comments like “But we have a relational database!” Or, “We stored every transaction for the past 10 years in Hadoop and we can retrieve any one of them in less than a second!” To these comments, I would say “Congratulations, your car has four wheels, right?”

To answer the important marketing questions, the database should be organized in a “buyer-centric” format. Going back to the database philosophy question, the fundamental design of the database changes based on its main purpose, much like the way a sports sedan and an SUV that share the same wheel base and engine end up shaped differently.

Marketing is about people. And, at the center of the marketing database, there have to be people. Every data element in the base should be “describing” those people.

Unfortunately, most relational databases are transaction-, channel- or product-centric, describing events and transactions—but not the people. Unstructured databases that are tuned primarily for massive storage and rapid retrieval may just have pieces of data all over the place, necessitating serious rearrangement to answer some of the most basic business questions.

So, the question still stands. Is your database marketing ready? Because if it is, you would have taken no time to answer my questions listed above and say: “Yeah, I got this. Anything else?”

Now, imagine the difference between marketers who get to the answers with a few clicks vs. the ones who have no clue where to begin, even when sitting on mounds of data. The difference between the two is not the size of the investment, but the design philosophy.

I just hope that you did not buy a sports car when you needed a truck.