Irrational Customers and 2013’s Tip Top Marketing Campaign

Exhale, just landed from a jam-packed Direct Marketing Association DMA13 conference … You have to hand it to New Zealanders. For two years’ running, that nation’s marketing practitioners have nailed a Diamond ECHO from the Direct Marketing Association’s International ECHO Awards, which were presented last week during DMA13, the association’s annual conference in Chicago.

Exhale, just landed from a jam-packed Direct Marketing Association DMA13 conference

New Zealanders are Diamond
You have to hand it to New Zealanders. For two years’ running, that nation’s marketing practitioners have nailed a Diamond ECHO from the Direct Marketing Association’s International ECHO Awards, which were presented last week during DMA13, the association’s annual conference in Chicago.

This year’s top data-driven marketing campaign in the world was for ice cream maker Tip Top (Fonterra Brands Ltd), in a campaign created by Colenso BBDO/Proximity New Zealand called “Feel Tip Top.” According to the ECHO Award entry:

A 75-year-old local ice cream brand in New Zealand aimed to regain relevance and brand momentum using customer experience. New Zealanders flocked to Facebook for the opportunity to nominate friends, family members or colleagues to receive a personally addressed, hand-delivered ice cream. By encouraging folks to ‘feel tip-top’ and indulge in a sweet treat and fond memory with friends, Tip Top highlighted new flavors and sub-brands, exceeded its nomination goal by more than fifteen-fold, and turned around a 17.6 percent decline into 16.7 percent growth across all categories.

I guess I ought to “like” Tip Top on Facebook.

Solidifying DMA’s Books
During the Annual Business Meeting of the association, it was announced that DMA has streamlined and simplified its annual dues structure into six tiers—from less than $800 on the low end (startups, consultants and the like) up to $75,000 for US and global direct marketing leaders. DMA generated $22.5 million in revenue last year, compared to $20.7 million in expenses.

While at the Annual Business Meeting, President & CEO Linda Woolley spoke to the recently approved Strategic Plan of the association, where she reported advocacy, networking and compliance services are the three areas of focus for association activity in the year ahead. DMA recently (in late May) launched a DMA Litigation Center, which will look to help businesses cope with privacy litigation, and to fight patent abuse, among other legal issues. Outgoing DMA Chairman Matt Blumberg, CEO & chairman of ReturnPath, also announced that the new DMA Chairman for 2013-2015 (a two-year term) is Alliant President & CEO JoAnne Monfradi Dunn (congratulations to my client), who told members she plans to serve as an ambassador between DMA’s management and its members.

(Ir)rational Consumers
Dan Ariely, in a keynote session sponsored by The Wilde Agency, gave case after case where consumers were seen to act irrationally, and that marketers can influence outcomes (and response) markedly by designing and testing creative offers and incentives. One of my favorites was the offer by The Economist (I’m an avid reader) where potential subscribers were offered $125 for the print magazine, and $59 for an online-only magazine, and the online-only offer won. But when a third option was added—$125 for both the print & online magazine—that option was the clear winner.

When an insurance company wanted to sell life insurance policies, and try to convince persons to upgrade, it tried repeatedly to sell in copy the benefits of more coverage—but with little access. When it decided to include a chart that clearly showed the higher amounts of coverage available—that the consumer was foregoing at his or her existing amount of coverage—well, it resulted in a 500 percent lift. My takeaways: always test, find a clever way to visualize data and offers, and always expect the irrational as much as the rational. “Standards Economics are not the same as Behavioral Economics,” he said. Indeed.

Well, that was just from two page of notes from the conference—I’m still dissecting a dozen more sessions. I have to say, this was the first conference in many years where I was accompanied by a “newbie,” a practitioner on the brand side making her first DMA appearance. She had a lot to complain about—there were way too many great sessions on offer at the same time, and we tag-teamed a bit to cover them simultaneously where we could. I think next year, she’ll be bringing some of her colleagues.

Mark your calendar for San Diego for the last week of October 2014.

Trade Associations Bond on Industry Self-Regulation

With the threat of an online privacy bill looming, some of the nation’s largest media and marketing trade associations released self-regulatory principles on July 2 to protect consumer privacy in ad-supported interactive media.

With the threat of an online privacy bill looming, some of the nation’s largest media and marketing trade associations released self-regulatory principles on July 2 to protect consumer privacy in ad-supported interactive media.

The seven principles will require advertisers and Web sites to clearly inform consumers about data collection practices and enable them to exercise control over that information. The collaboration includes the American Association of Advertising Agencies, the Association of National Advertisers, the Direct Marketing Association and the Interactive Advertising Bureau.

The Council of Better Business Bureaus is also part of the effort and has agreed, along with the DMA, to implement accountability programs to promote widespread adoption of the principles.

This is a big deal: Taken collectively, the participating associations represent more than 5,000 U.S. companies, and the task force represents the first time all advertising and marketing industry associations have come together to develop self-regulatory principles.

And it should be a big deal, quite frankly. Concerns around government regulation on the use and collection of data on the Internet has been swelling in the industry over the past few years as the medium has become all-encompassing. What’s more, the House Communications Subcommittee Chairman Rick Boucher (D-Va.) is preparing an online privacy bill right now that may contain an “opt-in” provision that would prevent companies from targeting consumers without their explicit permission.

The seven principles
The self-regulatory program is expected to be implemented at the beginning of 2010. The process, however, started in January, when the task force announced it was working on developing these principles in direct response to calls by the Federal Trade Commission.
The principles are designed to address consumer concerns about the use of personal information and interest-based advertising, while preserving the robust advertising that supports free online content and the ability to deliver relevant advertising to consumers.
The seven principles include the following:

  • The Education Principle, which calls for organizations to educate individuals and businesses about online behavioral advertising. Along these lines, a major campaign — expected to exceed 500 million online advertising impressions — will be launched over the next 18 months to educate consumers about online behavioral advertising, the benefits of these practices and the means to exercise choice.
  • The Transparency Principle, which calls for clearer and easily accessible disclosures to consumers about data collection and use practices associated with online behavioral advertising.
  • The Consumer Control Principle, which requires Internet access service providers and providers of desktop applications software such as Web browser toolbars to obtain the consent of users before engaging in online behavioral advertising, and take steps to de-identify the data used for such purposes.
  • The Data Security Principle, which calls for organizations to provide reasonable security for, and limited retention of, data collected and used for online behavioral advertising purposes.
  • The Material Changes Principle, which calls on organizations to obtain consent for any material change to their online behavioral advertising data collection and use policies and practices to data collected prior to such change.
  • The Sensitive Data Principle, which recognizes that data collected from children and used for online behavioral advertising merits heightened protection, and requires parental consent for behavioral advertising to consumers known to be less than 13 on child-directed Web sites. This principle also provides heightened protections to certain health and financial data when attributable to a specific individual.
  • The Accountability Principle, which calls for the development of programs to further advance these principles, including programs to monitor and report instances of uncorrected noncompliance with these principles to appropriate government agencies.

Sounds like a plan to me. What do you think? Do you think this initiative will stave off government regulation for good, or should these trade groups be doing more? Leave a comment here, and let us know how you feel.