Marketing Pros Provide Advice for Peers

When marketing pros provide advice, marketing practitioners listen. One of the high points of the New York marketing community calendar each year is the Silver Apple Gala hosted by the Direct Marketing Club of New York. The fete toasts the business and industry leadership success of honored individuals.

When marketing pros provide advice, marketing practitioners listen. One of the high points of the New York marketing community calendar each year is the Silver Apple Gala hosted by the Direct Marketing Club of New York. The fete, held this year on Nov. 7 near Times Square, toasts the business and industry leadership success of honored individuals, and at least one corporation or organization.

Each “Silver Apple” recipient has contributed for 25 or more years to our field, and since 1985, there have been 248 such honorees, including these four individuals in 2019:

Marketing, Career Wisdom They Share

So when more than 200 of your friends, family, and peers come together, what pearls of wisdom do you have to share?

Carl Horton, IBM

“The ability to execute against the dream in real time,” is what excites Carl Horton, Jr., in his current position in B2B marketing at IBM. Horton credits colleagues who have placed “personal investments in me” and dared to let him take crazy ideas (artificial intelligence applications don’t seem so crazy today) and make them reality, as well as the unconditional love of family.

One key takeaway from Horton:

“The importance of diversity in leadership and innovation: The NextGen of innovation may come from someone of experience, income, race, gender, gender identity, very different from our own.”

Here, here, we need to foster it.

Britt Vatne, ALC

Britt Vatne, who leads the data management practice at ALC, talked about a career pivot 15 years ago, when she worked with a nonprofit client for the first time, March of Dimes, and it showed to her how critical acquiring, retaining, and growing donors are. She also credited industry luminaries, such as the late Bob Castle and the energetic Donn Rappaport (in the room) – as well as her father, who came to America from Norway, never finished primary school, and taught her “there is no substitute for hard work.” She was the first of her family to go to college.

“Being human, being respectful, and having integrity are non-negotiable,” she said. “Be a positive role model, and you’ll have the love and loyalty of family.”

And probably, quite a few colleagues and clients, too.

Joe Pych, NextMark & Bionic Advertising

Joe Pych, who is the startup founder of two companies — NextMark and Bionic Advertising, says his “go-to metric is sales growth.” CRM [customer relationship management] is so much more of an opportunity than simply managing costs, he says. Set a goal, uncover an idea, execute, and measure results.

”I feel selfish standing alone with so much support I’ve received over the years,” he said, referring first to his mother, who put four children through college on an electrician’s salary – and then went and got a masters herself.

He also thanked many of his client data businesses that helped make his first company take off — companies, such as MeritDirect, ALC, Worlddata, and Specialists Marketing Services (SMS), among others – who took a chance on a Hanover, NH-based enterprise. To his wife, Robin.

“Those missed vacations, I’m sorry … again.”

Gretchen Littlefield, Moore DM Group

Gretchen Littlefield, CEO of Moore DM Group for the past two years, also served at Infogroup for 14 years, where she helped develop its nonprofit, political, and federal government marketing practice – which propelled her into her current role atop Moore.

In 2018, she co-founded the Nonprofit Alliance, where she serves as vice chair, to advance in Washington the interests of nonprofit and charitable organizations.

“I fell into this business like everyone else,” she said, starting from data entry and advancing to “getting data [insights] out of the industry.”

She thanked many industry leaders among her mentors and influencers, among them Jim Moore, Larry May, and Vin Gupta.

“It seems as if on every innovation, we are working together and competing all the time. Coopetition,” she said. “The flow of data – from list rentals, to coops, to marketing clouds. We share data for growth.”

Littlefield also emphasized investment in education, citing Marketing EDGE and Direct Marketing Club of New York, for their respective roles in attracting bright students to the marketing field.

“Time goes by faster than we expect — Joe [Pych] and I were Marketing EDGE Rising Stars back in the day. I’m just as excited today as my first day in direct marketing, but mostly grateful for the friendships.”

In addition, there were three special honors bestowed, among them a first-time “Corporate Golden Apple” to Marketing EDGE for its more than half-century of creating and connecting market-ready college students for careers in marketing. And two Excellence Apples:

  • 2019 Apple of Excellence, Advocacy:
    Tony Hadley, SVP, Regulation and Public Policy, Experian (Washington, DC)
  • 2019 Apple of Excellence Disruptor:
    Mayur Gupta, CMO, Freshly (New York, NY)

There’s more to share – but that likely will be another post! Stay tuned …

Toasting 2018 Silver Apple Honorees: In Their Words

You might have heard of a big event that happened last week in the USA. No, not THAT one. I’m talking about but the presentation of the Direct Marketing Club of New York’s 2018 Silver Apples honors. Here’s more about the awards, from the Silver Apple honorees themselves.

Silver Apple Honorees ballroom
Photo Credit: Edison Ballroom via DMCNY, 2018

You might have heard of a big event that happened last week in the USA. No, not THAT one. I’m talking about but the presentation of the Direct Marketing Club of New York’s 2018 Silver Apples honors. Here’s more about the awards, from the Silver Apple honorees themselves.

The Silver Apples recognize leadership, stewardship and business success mid-career in the data, direct and digital marketing field. Each honoree has (more or less) 25 years of experience, with matching achievements to point to … and all have additional contributions to our industry, community, mentoring and giving back.

With the assistance of newly named The Drum U.S. Editor Ginger Conlon, I thought it worth amplifying a few key industry insights shared by this year’s individual honorees:

Anita Absey, Chief Revenue Officer, Voxy (New York):

Favorite Data Story: “Back in the very early days when I was at Infobase, we were doing data overlays on customer databases, which was novel at the time. While working with a large insurer, doing overlays of demographic and socioeconomic data on their database, the profile and segmentation scheme that emerged from that work actually defied some of the assumptions that they had about the characteristics for their customers’ profile. The insights we provided them helped them make subtle changes in their communications and targeting to customers, which improved the overall risk profile of their customer base. It was gratifying to see how data could affirm or deny assumptions and enable our client to make decisions that helped improve the risk profile of their business.”

Measurement: “Hope is not a strategy. Your actions have to be data-based, not hopeful. Similarly, you can’t manage what you can’t measure. Unless you have data that points you to the actions and decisions that are best for the business, you’re running blind.”

Matt Blumberg, Co-Founder and Chief Executive Officer, Return Path, Inc. (New York):

On Choosing Marketing: “The thing that drew me to marketing was the Internet. I had been working as an investor at a venture capital firm that invested in software companies. Once Netscape went public and people started figuring out the short- and the long-term potential of the Internet, I got very excited about working in that field. Unbeknownst to me at the time, the Internet is all about direct marketing. For the first several years of my career, I would never have described myself as a direct marketer; but in hindsight, obviously, I was.”

On Inspiration: “It’s several sentences out of a speech by Theodore Roosevelt called ‘The Man in the Arena.’
It’s incredible. It goes:

” ‘ … The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood; who strives valiantly; who errs, who comes short again and again, because there is no effort without error and shortcoming; but who does actually strive to do the deeds; who knows great enthusiasms, the great devotions; who spends himself in a worthy cause; who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement, and who at the worst, if he fails, at least fails while daring greatly, so that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who neither know victory nor defeat.’

“I take it as the entrepreneur’s motto. It’s a beautiful passage that I have taped up everywhere.”

Pam Haas, Account Director, Experian Marketing Services (Providence, RI):

Overhyped: “Display and programmatic technologies are overhyped. It’s like the early days of email marketing: People just started sending millions of emails, hoping some would stick. The same thing is happening in display and programmatic. That part of the industry still needs to mature.”

Best Metric: “Right now, it’s the ROAS: Return on Ads Spent. I love that. For every dollar that the client is spending, we know that we are driving X number of dollars in sales.”

Career Advice: “Diversify. In marketing, there are so many different angles and specialties that you can focus your career on. Throughout my career, I’ve [been] able to gain experience in multiple facets of marketing: direct response, email technology, and in databases and modeling. Digital is so sexy right now, but the fundamentals still apply; so it’s important not to pigeonhole yourself into one area.

“While in a mentor program at Equifax, my mentor was a woman and she told me, ‘You have to be your own PR person. You have to make your accomplishments known, because nobody else is going to do that for you.’”

Keira Krausz, EVP and CMO, Nutrisystem, Inc. (Fort Washington, Penn.):

On Her Current Assignment: “I’m proud of where we are at Nutrisystem and I’m particularly proud of what we’ve built as a team. Our job is wonderful, because we get to help people live healthier and happier lives. Since 2013, we’ve nearly doubled the business, which means we’ve helped a whole lot more people get healthier and happier. Along the way, we’ve revamped nearly every aspect of our business that you can think of, and we’re just getting started.”

On Mentoring: “In my first years in marketing, I was always being asked what my goals were and how I saw myself in years to come, and I always felt flummoxed, because I didn’t know what to say. I wasn’t one of those young people who had their whole life planned out when I was 25, and I often felt insecure about that. But it turns out that was OK.

“So, one thing I did that I would advise is, from early on, try to work for someone you can learn from. Somebody who you admire, who has something unique, and who can teach you something that you think you’re missing. The rest will fall together.”

Tim Suther, SVP and General Manager, Data Solutions, Change Healthcare (Lombard, Ill.):

On Career Choice: “I’ve always been technology-oriented, from learning to code when I was 17 to graduating college with a finance degree. With that background, naturally, I was suspicious of marketing. A lot of marketing felt inauthentic and superficial to me. But I had this one moment where I actually saw a dynamic gains curve for the first time and I thought, ‘Oh my god, this is one of the most interesting things I’ve ever seen.’ It was the intersection of the art of marketing and the science of data that really drew me in; and boy, did I get lucky on that one, because that’s what it’s all about today.”

On Being Data-Driven: “This might surprise you a little bit, but it annoys me when marketers say that they’re data-driven, because that’s like saying, ‘OK, it’s time to turn off my brain and just let the data drive the story.’

“I think marketers are far better off when they are data-informed, where they’re combining what the data is telling them with their own business judgment to make the right decision. Human behavior is still too complicated to purely reduce to what an algorithm tells you to do; it has to be a combination of what the data is saying, creative savvy and business judgment.”

This year, DMCNY added two special awards not tied to mid-career, but recognizing two huge drivers in our business today: advocacy and disruption. The inaugural Apples of Excellence 2018 honorees include:

Advocacy:

Stu Ingis, Chairman, Venable LLP (Washington, D.C.):

On Policy-Making: “The whole privacy concern is overhyped. What’s not getting its fair recognition, in the policy world, is all of the innovation that the marketing community brings to society. For instance, they’re bringing real-time targeted marketing to television and delivering marketing communications that consumers are interested in on a personalized basis.”

On Careers: “Take the long view. Work really hard; don’t worry about the compensation or the glory, and then persevere. Stay with it. Don’t switch jobs all the time thinking that something else is always better. If you develop your skills, the good work will come to you. You don’t have to go to it.

“I’d been representing the DMA for about two years, and I had an opportunity to leave the law firm and go out in the early Internet age at Yahoo!

“Yahoo! stock was going up. I would have made millions of dollars a day. I went to Ron Plesser and said, ‘I like working for you; I like the clients; I like the work I’m doing. But I could go get really rich working for this company.’ He said, ‘Why do you want to do that? It’ll ruin your life.’ For whatever reason, I actually believed him and agreed with him. And I stayed at my job. It was probably the best decision I ever made. I don’t regret it for a second.”

Disruptor Award, Presented by Alliant:

Bonin Bough, Founder and Chief Growth Officer, Bonin Ventures (New York):

About Bonin: “His unique approach of applying innovative technology to create breakthrough campaigns helped to reinvigorate traditional marketing brands, such as Gatorade, Honey Maid, Oreo and Pepsi.

“But his influence doesn’t stop there. Bonin believes in supporting young talent and savvy entrepreneurs. While at Mondelēz International, for example, he created internal programs to mentor young talent and launched a startup innovation program, Mobile Futures, to provide a platform for marketing-tech and agency start-ups to work with the CPG giant.

“Stephanie Agresta, global director of enterprise growth at Qnary, describes him best in her recommendation on LinkedIn: ‘Bonin is a force of nature … A true rockstar from Cleveland to Cannes, Bonin has been [at] the forefront of the digital revolution from the beginning. Smart, successful, and connected, Bonin has the pulse on what’s next. Those that know Bonin well can also attest to his generosity, commitment to mentorship and a deep belief that anything is possible.’”

Since I had the privilege of interacting with Bonin at DMA &Then18 recently, I can attest the walls fall away when you converse with him. Disrupted, indeed.

All of these honorees as well as corporate recipient Winterberry Group have many things to teach us. That’s why it’s important we continue to recognize these business leaders, as marketing today, as Matt Blumberg says, is a 100 different things. It’s the business outcomes that matter.

How Big Idea Marketing Can Live on in Data-Driven Storytelling

In an era not so long ago, creative directors lived in a world where the big idea was the champion — and that champion came from highly compensated (more or less) idea makers, both themselves and their creative teams, and the big idea was put to the advertising test. If big idea marketing were provocative enough, then it might win creative awards at a global creative festival. Other creatives would fawn, congratulate each other, and champagne would flow. Not a bad outcome, if you’re a creative director.

big idea marketing
Credit: Pixabay by Mohamed Hassan

In an era not so long ago, creative directors lived in a world where the big idea was the champion — and that champion came from highly compensated (more or less) idea makers, both themselves and their creative teams, and the big idea was put to the advertising test. If big idea marketing were provocative enough, then it might win creative awards at a global creative festival. Other creatives would fawn, congratulate each other, and champagne would flow. Not a bad outcome, if you’re a creative director.

But did the advertising work? Did it achieve a client business objective? Did it engage customers and produce sales, orders, leads …? Perhaps, or perhaps not. Back then, only direct marketers cared about measurement.

How Data Has Changed Advertising … Forever

Enter data. Well, data entered the advertising marketplace when direct mail and direct selling made its debut. But not to discount direct mail pioneers and their cousins in direct-response print and broadcast and telemarketing, let’s fast forward to the digital era. Wow! Today, do we have data!

Combine that creative genius with a heavy dose of data insights and strategy, and now we have data-driven creative — where creative effort is measured against action. No more gut instincts and guesswork. Agencies and in-house marketing departments can prove that their creative ideation works and, in fact, can use prospect and customer data to drive the creative ideation to predict and produce defined business outcomes.

Is there still a role for big idea marketing? Of course! In fact, breakthrough creative is indeed a mechanism for breaking clutter. But now, we have the means for one more de-clutter breakthrough: relevance. Using data insights to drive strategy, combined with compelling creative and storytelling, and now we’re proving our C-suite mettle.

There’s a role for creative festivals.

Rethinking Ad Festivals

But how about a data festival … or a data-driven storytelling festival? Well, we may just have one, and it’s been around for a while. It’s the International ECHO Award Competition, with its call for entries now underway. (I’m a member of the Data & Marketing Association ECHO Board of Governors.)

If an agency today is not proving its command of creative, data and relevance, then it’s not proving its presence as a business driver — no matter how many creative trophies are in the case. Winning an ECHO is different. It’s always been about data-driven storytelling, and it’s always been about strategy, creative AND results, more or less in equal measure. ECHOs serve as proof points for agencies, and in-house marketing teams, that they have data chops. They serve as signals to C-suites that ECHO winners are trusted business partners who know ad tech, martech, data management platforms, analytics prowess and have a discipline to test and measure — all in equal faith to the creative big idea.

Left brain, right brain. Yes, there’s still necessary discussion today about data, measurement and unfettered creative. But in today’s world, we can have both creative and relevance through data. In fact we must have both to capture elusive consumer attention, and to produce action … to prove our worth.

This roster of agencies let’s fast forward — and their agency groups let’s fast forward — have been named ECHO Award finalists, and Diamond, Gold, Silver and Bronze ECHO trophy winners in 2015, 2016 and 2017. Who will be joining them in 2018? In October, in Las Vegas, we’ll find out.

Credit: DMA

In My Mailbox & Yours | An Artful Invite to a Special Evening

It’s my favorite mail piece this year — and it didn’t even include a check.

direct mail
Credit: Chet Dalzell

It’s my favorite mail piece this year — and it didn’t even include a check.

But it did include an invitation for payment. You may have received it, too.

Late next week (Nov. 16), 300-plus marketers will gather in New York for the 2017 Annual Gala Evening, the presentation of the 33rd Annual Silver Apples Awards. There, we pay homage to marketing leaders who have given 25 years (at least) of distinguished service to our field.

[This year’s Silver Apple honorees are Fran Green, ALC; John Princiotta, PCH; Eva Reda, American Express; Randall Rothenberg, IAB; Jay Schwedelson, Worldata; Rita Shankewitz, Bottom Line, Inc.; Corporate Honoree BMI Global OMS; and special Golden Apple Honoree Stu Boysen, Direct Marketing Club of New York (DMCNY).]

It is a fete. It is New York’s data, digital and direct marketing’s annual night out. You even see a national audience there.

But what I want to talk about is the marketing effort for the event this year. Each honoree is remarkable in his or her own way, which is why I really appreciated this year’s marketing campaign executed by DMCNY volunteers and partners.

Since on or about Labor Day, I — and a few thousand others like me — received a customary “Save the Date” email and the news announcement of the winners, first announced collectively. [Disclosure: I prepped the news release.]

But this year, we were introduced individually to each of the honorees, in a short email every 10 or so days, which gave a little bit of biographical color — personal and professional — on each honoree. The single honoree-focused digital effort culminated in a colorful direct mail invitation with a reply card and envelope, and a protected film envelope, which had each photo of the honorees in a frame. The backside of each framed photo included their career highlights.

The art is outstanding — somewhat reminiscent of Pollock or Calder — which I can appreciate as we celebrate somewhere between MOMA and the Whitney (Edison Ballroom, to be exact).

I often think about when is the right moment for print, a moment for mail, amid our increasingly social-digital-mobile lives. Physically receiving, opening and touching an invite still feels special to me, and I do think it elevates the “weight” of the honor we will be celebrating, and the important contributions these professionals make. While the gala itself will serve as the climax, I did find the mail moment here to be an exciting precursor — and well-timed, following the wave of individual honoree-focused emails, and just ahead of the last-minute digital reminders and follow-ups. Not every creative element was new in concept, but they were certainly fresh in concert.

Well done, DMCNY. As a past honoree, I am blessed to be able to say “thank you.” As I think about the upcoming week, I can say we’ve raised the curtain to this year’s honorees with elán and spirit — one I’m hopeful carries through the experience of the event.

See you next Thursday in New York.

[Credits for the DMCNY Silver Apples marketing effort go to several folks, including: Invitation & Program Cover Design: Robert Snow of Robert Snow Marketing Communications; Invitation Printing and Mailing & Program Book Printing: McVicker & Higginbotham; Program Booklet Design: Cheryl Biswurm, Turner Direct LLC; Email Design and Execution: Briana Kovar and Carolyn Lagermasini, Association & Conference Group; as well as an entire Silver Apples Planning Committeeso you’ll need to be there presently to give them all kudos.]

Marketing Awards: What Are They Good For?

When I first started in this business, I remember that our new business pitch at Ogilvy & Mather Direct always included a page about the many awards the agency had won — and the DMA ECHO Award was always front and center.

When I first started in this business, I remember that our new business pitch at Ogilvy & Mather Direct always included a page about the many awards the agency had won — and the DMA ECHO Award was always front and center.

Considering we spent all our energy trying to methodically figure out how to stimulate response among a target audience, the ECHO Award was worth bragging about as it celebrated the equal weighting of strategy, creative and results. And after all, if you got that trifecta right, the client was celebrating right along with you.

Today it’s no different. The Direct Marketing Association ECHO Award still recognizes and rewards those individuals who have figured out how to successfully achieve (or exceed!) a desired marketing objective — whether it’s to increase new lead volume, increase average order size, achieve a specific sales goal, retain customers or improve brand perception.

These are all goals established by the most senior of company management as part of overall business objectives, and they then leave it up to sales and marketing to figure out how to meet them. For most, it takes planning, research, strategic thinking, ingenuity, design and copy skill and, sometimes, a whole lot of luck, to create a marketing effort that explodes with success.

How many people can claim that they’ve been on that team?

Often, the DMA and the ECHO Awards are viewed as “old fashioned” or “the people who do direct mail” — but that’s far from reality. The techniques that were carefully cultivated over years of testing and re-testing, are now being applied across the digital landscape, from email to landing pages, in games and on Facebook.

Despite Millenials believing that they are the ones who invented targeting, retargeting, video, and the ability to track, collect and share data insights, direct marketers have been mastering and refining these tools for decades.

Some have complained that awards are worthless — that they don’t consider effectiveness (which is the point of advertising), or that they are merely a way of patting ourselves on the back, or that the high cost of entry precludes smaller agencies.

But effectiveness is one of the key judging metrics for the ECHOs — because what’s the point of designing creative marketing solutions if they’re not effective in helping the client achieve their goals?

And while every awards program needs to charge an entry fee as it takes staff to organize and administrate, the ECHOs are reasonably priced — especially if you get your act together and enter by the early-bird deadline.

And yes, as a winner, it is a way of patting ourselves on the shoulder, but when you create a campaign that helps meet or exceed a sales objective, we should all be shouting from the rooftops!

This year I’m honored to be the Judging Chair of the 2015 ECHO Awards. Our Judging Committee (comprised of volunteers) has worked hard to recruit over 150 senior judges from every corner of the globe. Our current past Chair of the ECHO Board of Governors took over an Ambassador role this year and has been busy working with other associations from dozens of domestic and international marketing organizations to encourage participation from every member — whether as an entrant or a Judge. If you think you’d qualify as a judge, we invite you to apply before June 1, 2015.

The ECHOs are not merely about recognizing ideas or expensive and elaborate creative solutions that only the biggest clients could afford. The ECHOs are carefully reviewed by a jury of marketing peers who carefully review the business challenges you faced, your objectives, your strategic brilliance, how you brought that brilliance to life creatively and the measurable results you achieved. If one of those dimensions falls flat, then your ability to win an ECHO diminishes dramatically.

The bottom line is that the ECHOs are about celebrating business success. And for that reason alone, those that enter and win should be prime targets for recruiters, because these are the people who have figured out how to move the needle. And trust me, that is no small feat.

Awards Bring Out Key Elements of Social Media

If social media had an Oscars, the annual Forrester Groundswell Awards would be them.

Now in their third year, the awards honor companies for excellence in achieving business and organizational goals with social technology. The program was developed to support principles outlined in the Forrester book “Groundswell: Winning in a World Transformed by Social Technologies” (Harvard Business Press, 2008).

If social media had an Oscars, the annual Forrester Groundswell Awards would be them.

Now in their third year, the awards honor companies for excellence in achieving business and organizational goals with social technology. The program was developed to support principles outlined in the Forrester book “Groundswell: Winning in a World Transformed by Social Technologies” (Harvard Business Press, 2008).

On Oct. 27, Forrester honored 13 winners at its Consumer Forum 2009 in Chicago. For the first time, awards went to business-to-business and business-to-consumer companies, as well as nonprofits. For a complete look at the winners and finalists, click here.

To me, the awards are unique because winners are awarded based on the following actions: listening, talking, energizing, supporting and embracing. These concepts represent the strategic goals Forrester advises organizations to consider when using social technologies to interact with their customers. I found this particularly refreshing, especially in an age when marketing awards seem to be a dime a dozen and don’t really get to the heart of what matters when it comes to making money.

What’s more, this year, for the second year in a row, the Groundswell Award selection process allowed the general public to rate and comment on all entries on the Groundswell website. Forrester took the community’s evaluations into account when selecting winners, but chose winning entries based on proof of business value, and not which applications were the most popular.

Here’s a look at some of the winning companies and their programs, via the Groundswell site:

NASCAR Fan Council/Vision Critical. NASCAR and Vision Critical, which won in the B-to-C Listening category, created a community of 12,000 fans and used it to reduce research costs by 80 percent. NASCAR also took the community’s suggestions and changed its restarts from single file to double file, which fans loved.

Lion Brand Yarn Blog and Podcast/Converseon. These companies won in the B-to-C Talking division for a program where Converseon identified influential bloggers and social networks dedicated to knitting and crocheting. Lion Brand Yarn then created a biweekly podcast and targeted it to these groups. The podcast eventually generated 15,000 to 20,000 downloads and a blog featuring “knit-alongs.” This drove impressive e-commerce sales for the brand, including people who ordered the knit-along projects. Also, those who visited the company’s social media sites were 41 percent more likely to buy at the website.

Scholastic Book Clubs Reading Task Force Community/Communispace. These companies won in the B-to-B Embracing division for a program that involved redesigning Scholastic’s school book sales flyer, which is its main vehicle for book sales through schools. Using a community of 200 teachers and 100 parents created by Communispace, Scholastic embarked on a 10-week collaborative process to talk to members about how to improve the design of the flyer. The process generated ideas such as including student recommendations and showing interior pages so parents could judge the reading level of the books. Results? The new flyer has already generated a 3 percent increase in sales in test markets.

I think all of these programs exhibit great, unique uses of social media and technology, and show how the medium can bring about real, specific ROI. What do you think? Post your comments here.