Copywriting for the Most of Awareness Levels

A fundamental of copywriting is to write to the awareness levels of your prospects. But all too often, the awareness level of prospects is overlooked. … and it’s perhaps the most important aspect of writing a promotion.

Branding
“Branding,” Creative Commons license. | Credit: Flickr by Limelight Leads

A fundamental of copywriting is to write to the awareness levels of your prospects. But all too often, the awareness level of prospects is often overlooked. … and it’s perhaps the most important aspect of writing a promotion.

A few weeks ago, I shared a few reasons Why Direct Mail Control Packages Fatigue. And in my last blog, I wrote about Copywriting for the Least of Awareness Levels.

So today, it’s about copywriting for the most aware of your prospects so you can meet them where they are with your copy and offer.

I’ve written about imagining a 1 to 7 scale where a 1 represents that your prospect is completely unaware of any aspect of your product or service, so indirect headlines and leads tend to work best. Conversely, a 7 means your prospect is completely aware where you would use direct headlines and leads. I’ve used information from a class that I teach copywriters for AWAI, along with concepts from a classic direct marketing book, Breaththrough Advertising, by Eugene M. Schwartz. If you missed my last post, read it here for descriptions of Levels 1 to 3.

Levels 5 to 7 are the most aware prospects. Level 4 is where you don’t know whether prospects are aware or not. You should test both direct, and indirect headlines and leads to find out the side of the awareness scale that defines your prospect.

Level Five

Here you’ve crossed the place from unaware (Levels 1-3) to a gradual increase in awareness where your approach can be more direct. If you’ve observed in your own testing, or what a competitor is doing, that success is happening with direct headlines and leads, then enlarge on what’s working.

  • A problem/solution headline or lead will ease you into the awareness side of the scale. This is for prospects who realize they have a problem, and that a solution exists, but they don’t know your product provides the solution.
  • Be mindful that your prospect may become confused if competitors are making claims that aren’t consistent with yours. When that happens, they become skeptical.

Level Six

You’re getting close to that point where your prospects know it all about your product or service. Maybe they’ve bought your product, or a competitor’s product. But there’s still room to introduce something new. Think of it as an opportunity to renew, or restore, a positioning or message.

  • Promise something new that hasn’t been promoted previously.
  • The believability of prior promises could start to become questioned, but if the desire of your market is still there, find a new way to satisfy it (but don’t repeat past claims).
  • Devise a new way to show how your product works.

Level Seven

This level is where your prospects are highly aware of your category of product, and perhaps your brand. They know your product and what it can do for them. They may even be tired of your promises. They’re done with hearing from you and they may not even believe you anymore. So this is where you can use the most direct type of lead.

  • Begin with your offer or an invitation.
  • Find a new credibility element: testimonial or research.
  • Elaborate on something new about your product or service.
  • Better: look for a new feature to refresh your promise.

When you align your message with the worldview of your prospective customer using this awareness scale, your stand a much better opportunity to succeed.

Gary Hennerberg’s latest book is “Crack the Customer Mind Code: Seven Pathways from Head to Heart to YES!” is available on Amazon. For a free download with more detail about the seven pathways and other copywriting and consulting tips, go to Hennerberg.com.

Copywriting for the Least of Awareness Levels

Meeting your prospective customer where they are may be a cliché to many. However, too often, marketers and copywriters still don’t take into account the prospect’s state of awareness about the product or service being offered. As a result, headlines and leads completely miss the mark and fail.

Meeting your prospective customer where they are may be a cliché to many. However, too often, marketers and copywriters still don’t take into account the prospect’s state of awareness about the product or service being offered. As a result, headlines and leads completely miss the mark and fail.

In my last blog post, I shared a few reasons “Why Direct Mail Control Packages Fatigue.”

One reason that messaging — whether for direct mail or any other channel— fatigues is because you lose track of your prospective customer’s state of awareness of their problem, your solution, and where you meet them with your copy and offer.

Imagine a scale of 1 to 7 where a 1 represents that your prospect is completely unaware of any aspect of your product or service. Conversely, a 7 means your prospect is completely aware. If your prospect is completely unaware of any aspect of your product or service, but your message is written at a level of 7, then you have a disconnect. By the way, age or generation seldom has anything to do with an awareness scale.

Of course, you must have good insights about your prospective customers to know where on the scale you want to land. So let’s dive into the first three levels on this scale and begin with ideas about how to reach those with the least awareness of your product or service. . For inspiration, I’ve used information from a class that I teach copywriters for AWAI, along with concepts from a classic direct marketing book, “Breaththrough Advertising,” by Eugene M. Schwartz.

Level One

If you’re at level one, it’s probably because you’re either among the first in the market for a new product or service, or your product or service is only occasionally or rarely considered by any given consumer. Consider this approach:

  • Be simple and direct.
  • Offer context about what you’re offering to solve—even a brief statement that shows you understand the problem the readers is facing.
  • Name the need or the claim in your headline.
  • Bring in your product information and prove that it works.
  • Use a story

Level Two

Here, you expand on what you would do in level one. A declaration headline and lead can be effective:

  • Be bold or even startling.
  • Be concise, engaging, and specific.
  • You’ll need to offer proof of your declaration or testimonials.
  • A newsworthy prediction might work.

Level Three

At this level, your prospects have likely heard the claims. Their desire may be building, so you might shift your approach from what the product does to how it works. Consider using, or adapting the concept of sharing a secret:

  • Promise a secret new way to satisfy a long-time desire.
  • Share an intriguing secret from a credible source.
  • The prospect needs to clearly see how he or she will benefit.
  • If you use a secret, tease it in the headline, then drop clues as your message unfolds.

In my next blog post, I’ll offer ideas about how to reach the most aware levels—levels 5-7—on this awareness scale.

Gary Hennerberg’s latest book is “Crack the Customer Mind Code: Seven Pathways from Head to Heart to YES!” is available on Amazon. For a free download with more detail about the seven pathways and other copywriting and consulting tips, go to Hennerberg.com.

Customer Value: Narrowcasting vs. Broadcasting

The traditional model for customer acquisition has essentially been a broadcast approach, reaching a large audience generally descriptive of the customer base. Contrast this with what is sometimes described as “narrowcasting.”

Virtually every brand we’ve met with in the last few months is hungry for new customers: The war for the customer is on. For more on growing your customer base, consider reading “Bigger is Better: How to Scale Up Customer Acquisition Smarter,” which is an article we published recently about how to grow your customer base.

Many organizations are hooked on customer acquisition. That is, in order to hit sales plans for the organization, new customers will be required in large numbers. It’s about as easy to kick the “acquisition addiction” as it is to kick any other for most brands. Try going without coffee suddenly, and see how your head feels. It’s not very different from reducing a business’s dependence on customer acquisition as a means to achieving revenue and profit targets.

Organizations that need ever larger numbers of new customers to achieve growth goals eventually will find the cost of acquiring incremental net new customers can become prohibitive.

Broadcast vs. Narrowcast
The traditional model for advertising and customer acquisition has essentially been a broadcast approach, reaching a large audience that is generally descriptive of the customer who a brand believes to be a fit. Contrast this with what is sometimes described as a “narrowcasting” strategy. Narrowcasting uses customer intelligence to understand a great number of discrete dimensions that a consumer possesses and can leverage statistical methods to validate the accuracy and predictiveness of targeting customers through these methods.

The chart below, depicting the value of customers acquired through traditional broadcast capabilities upfront and over time helps illustrate why “broadcast” strategies for customer acquisition alone aren’t enough.

Research for Mike Ferranti blog

Broadcast Acquisition Strategies Lack Focus on Customer Value
Large numbers of customers have been acquired in a trailing 13-month window – lots of them. The challenge is this cohort of customers has been acquired without adequate consideration of the right target.

Consider the fact that the target customer value of average or better customers is around $500. In the example above, the marketer has acquired a large number of customers who are lagging in their economic contribution to the business. While the customer acquisition metrics may look good, this was a large campaign and produced several hundreds of thousands of customers over its duration – the average value of those customers is quite low indeed.

Low Customer Value Manifests Itself, Even if Acquisition Volume Is High
When sales targets are rising, it becomes harder to justify the high cost of customer acquisition if the customers previously acquired are underperforming. This leads to a very common bind marketers are placed in. The only way to “make the number” is to acquire more and more.

The most competitive and high quality businesses steadily acquire and have a robust customer base whose economic contribution is materially higher. Consequently, profits are higher, and we have a fundamentally better business.

Oftentimes, “broadcast” advertising approaches define the target with a single criteria like age, income or geography. This can be effective, especially when the media is bought at a good value. However, “effective” is almost always defined as “number of customers acquired.” This of course is a reasonable way to judge the performance of the marketing – at least by traditional standards.

There is another way to measure the success of the campaign that is only just beginning to be understood by many traditional “broadcast” marketers: customer value. The chart above shows that this cohort of acquired customers had relatively low economic value.

Root Causes of Low Customer Value
What are the causes of low value? It would be fair to start with the ongoing marketing and relationship with the customer. Bad service could keep customers from returning. Poor quality could lead to excessive returns. Over-promotion could drive down value. Getting the message and frequency wrong could lead to underperformance of the cohort. These are all viable reasons for lower value that need to be rationally and methodically ruled out prior to looking elsewhere.

Therefore, if operational issues are not clear – either through organizational KPI tracking, or simply by monitoring Twitter — then a marketing professional needs to start looking at three things.

  1. The Target (and Media)
  2. The Offer (and Message)
  3. The Creative

Given the target is historically responsible for up to 70 percent of the success of advertising, this is the first place a professional data-driven marketer would look.

Target Definition Defines the Customer You Acquire, and It Drives Customer Value.
A fact that is often overlooked is that target definition means not just focusing efforts and advertising spent on consumers who are most likely to convert and become customers, but it also defines what kind of customers they have the potential to become.

In conversations with CMOs, we often discuss “the target customer” or the “ideal customer” they wish to introduce their brand to. The descriptions of course vary by the brand and the product. Those target definitions are often more qualitative in nature. In fact, only about 30 percent of CMO’s we engage with regularly are focused on using hard data to define their customer base. While these are helpful and create a vocabulary for discussing and defining who the customer is, those primarily qualitative descriptors are often sculpted to align with media descriptors that make targeting “big and simple.”

“While simplifying is good business, when simplicity masks underlying business model challenges, a deeper look will ultimately be required, if not forced on the organization.”

While we would not refute a place for those descriptors of a valued consumer, they do fall short of true target definition. Ideally, the process of defining the customer who a brand wishes to pursue must begin with a thorough inventory of the customers it already has, and a substantial enhancement of those customer records which provides vibrant metrics on affluence, age, ethnographic, urbanicity, purchasing behaviors, credit history, geo- and demo-graphics, net worth, income, online purchasing, offline purchasing and potentially a great deal more.

How to Tell If Your Marketing Works

My live Target Marketing Group Webinar yesterday, “How to Tell if Your Marketing Works,” deals with my favorite topic: measuring the results of direct marketing beyond traditional response rate metrics. Direct Marketers are their own worst enemy when it comes to measurement. They often don’t know what’s working and what’s not, because their real ROI is hidden inside their data.

My live Target Marketing Group Webinar yesterday, “How to Tell if Your Marketing Works,” deals with my favorite topic: measuring the results of direct marketing beyond traditional response rate metrics. If you missed it, you can access it on-demand here.

Direct Marketers are their own worst enemy when it comes to measurement. They often don’t know what’s working and what’s not, because their real ROI is hidden inside their data.

Analyzing direct marketing campaigns was a lot easier before the advent of the multichannel consumer. Sure, there were a certain number of orders that we couldn’t attribute to a specific promotion, but for the most part response rates ruled. Now, people check out products in stores and then buy online to get a better deal (think flat screen TVs). Or they shop online, decide what they want based on features and product reviews, and then buy in-person (think cars).

And they do all of this on multiple devices: their home computers, their work computers and their mobile phones and tablets. So it’s hard to track them.

Even though consumers engage with brands on their own terms across multiple platforms, many marketers are stuck measuring the results of individual tactics rather than taking a holistic view of measurement. So when a single email or display ad fails to achieve the target level of attributable sales within a specific period of time, then they consider it a failure. Even though the communication has made an impact on those who didn’t respond, they can’t measure it, so they don’t count it. And while many direct marketing practitioners now embrace the idea that their advertising has a cumulative effect of building a brand over time, most fall short of being able to quantify that ROI with meaningful metrics.

This webinar examines four ways to uncover hidden ROI from your direct marketing promotions:

  1. Using your database to look beyond response rates
  2. Benchmarking your brand awareness and tying increases in awareness to sales
  3. Creating an engagement score to measure the cumulative effect of various promotions over time
  4. Measuring the value of your social media

If you’re interested, check it out here.

Use Market Research to Tie Brand Awareness and Purchase Intent to Sales

For years, I’ve been saying direct marketers are their own worst enemy when it comes to measurement. Direct marketers are good at measuring the things they’ve traditionally measured—response rates, cost per lead, cost per acquisition, etc.  But they’re not good at measuring the effect that their communications have on the non-responders; when, in fact, the effect of consistent branding in direct communications is what makes direct marketing powerhouses like Omaha Steaks and 1-800-flowers.com top of mind when consumers are ready to purchase (not to mention Amazon).

For years, I’ve been saying direct marketers are their own worst enemy when it comes to measurement.

Direct marketers are good at measuring the things they’ve traditionally measured—response rates, cost per lead, cost per acquisition, etc. But they’re not good at measuring the effect that their communications have on the non-responders; when, in fact, the effect of consistent branding in direct communications is what makes direct marketing powerhouses like Omaha Steaks and 1-800-flowers.com top of mind when consumers are ready to purchase (not to mention Amazon).

Even though consumers engage with brands on their own terms across multiple platforms, many marketers are stuck measuring the results of individual tactics rather than taking a holistic view of measurement. So when a single email or display ad fails to achieve the target level of attributable sales within a specific period of time, then they consider it a failure. Even though the communication has made an impact on those who didn’t respond, they can’t measure it, so they don’t count it.

And while many direct marketing practitioners now embrace the idea that their advertising has a cumulative effect of building a brand over time, most fall short of being able to quantify that ROI with meaningful metrics.

That’s where market research can help.

Consider the following word equations in light of how awareness contributes to sales for the top direct marketing companies:

Top of mind awareness + brand reputation + need = purchase intent
Top of mind awareness + brand reputation + immediate need = purchase

So it follows that if we can monitor awareness and reputation over time and index it to sales, then we can quantify the effects of those elements on sales revenue.

Start by surveying your prospects blindly—either through mail, email or search ads using relevant keywords. Offer an incentive that’s consistent with your product offering, e.g., “Save $$$ on cell phone accessories.” Ask respondents the following questions to determine the levels of unaided and aided awareness:

  • Which brands first come to mind when thinking of “category X”? (unaided awareness)
  • Which of the following brands (list) have you ever heard of? (aided awareness)

Get a better picture of the respondents’ product usage by asking:

  • Which brand(s) within category X do you “regularly” purchase?
  • Which brand is your favorite?
  • Which brand did you last purchase?
  • How often do you purchase this type of product?
    (Light, medium, heavy user?)
  • What percentage of “category X” purchases that you’ve made (within a certain timeframe) were “brand A”? (your share of customer)

For those who have used your brand, quantify purchase intent with the following question:

  • The next time you need this product, how likely are you to purchase “brand A”?

Next, index awareness levels to sales to sales revenues. Be sure account for category sales within the same time period. Your actual sales may have gone down, but the entire category may have gone down as well, and you may in fact have gotten more than your previous share of the category sales.

As you track these metrics over time, you will be able to quantify what a point of unaided awareness is worth in sales revenue. It’s one tool that will help you understand the effect that your communications have on sales beyond the responses that you can count directly.

What Customer-Centric, Customer-Obsessed Companies Must Do

In building relationships with and value for customers, my longtime observation is most organizations tend to progress through several stages of performance: customer awareness, customer sensitivity, customer focus and customer obsession. Here is the “executive summary” version of some conditions of each stage.

In building relationships with and value for customers, my longtime observation is most organizations tend to progress through several stages of performance: customer awareness, customer sensitivity, customer focus and customer obsession.

Here is the “executive summary” version of some conditions of each stage.

Customer Awareness
Customers are known, but in the aggregate. The organization believes it can select its customers and understand their needs. Measurement of performance is rudimentary, if it exists at all; and customer data are siloed. There’s a traditional, hierarchical, top-down management model, with “chimneyed” or “smokestack” communication (goes up or down, but not horizontal) with little evidence of teaming.

Customer Sensitivity
Customers are known, but still mostly in the aggregate. Customer service is somewhat more evident (though still viewed as a cost center), with a focus on complaint and problem resolution (but not proactive complaint generation; internal groups tend to point fingers and blame each other for negative customer issues). Measurement is mostly around customer attitudes and functional transactions, i.e. satisfaction, with little awareness of emotional relationship drivers. The organization has a principally traditional, hierarchical, top-down management model, with “chimneyed” or “smokestack” communication (goes up or down, but not horizontal), with some evidence of teaming (mostly in areas of complaint resolution).

Customer Focus
Customers are both known and valued, down to the individual level, and they are recognized as having different needs, both functional and emotional. The customer life cycle is front-and-center; and performance measurement is much more about emotion and value drivers than satisfaction. Service and value provision is regarded as an enterprise priority; and customer stabilization and recovery are goals when problems or complaints arise. Communication and collaboration with customers, between employees, and between employees and customers is featured. Management model and style is considerably more horizontal, with greater emphasis on teaming to improve customer value processes.

It’s notable that, at this more evolved and advanced stage of enterprise customer-centricity, complaints are thought of more in terms of a life cycle component, and recovery is more of a strategy than a resolution.

Customer Obsession
Throughout the organization, customer needs and expectations—especially those that are emotional—are well understood, and response is appropriate (and often proactive).

Everyone is involved in providing value to customers—from C-suite to front-line—and everyone understands his/her role. Customer behavior is recognized as essential to enterprise success, and optimal relationships are sought.

Performance measurement is focused, and shared, on what most monetizes customer behavior (loyalty, emotion and communication metrics—such as brand-bonding and advocacy—replace satisfaction and recommendation).

Customer service (along with pipelines and processes) is an enterprise priority, and seen as a vital, and profitable, element of value delivery.

The management model is far more horizontal, replacing traditional hierarchy; and there is an emphasis on teaming and inclusion of customers to create or enhance value.

Companies that are customer-obsessed, and what makes them both unique and successful, have been extensively profiled by consultants and the business press. Often, they go so far as to create emotionally driven, engaged and even branded experiences for their customers, strategically differentiating them from their peers.

In addition, these companies focus on the complete customer life cycle, and much more on retention, loyalty and risk mitigation (and even winback) than acquisition. Support experiences are strategic, nimble and seamless, and often omnichannel. Multiple sources of data are used to develop insights. Recognizing the information needs of their customers, they invest in altruistic content creation (over advertising); and they communicate proactively and in as personalized a manner as possible

Customer obsession, what I refer to as “inside-out” customer-centricity, has been a frequent subject of my blogs and articles: One of Albert Einstein’s iconic quotes reflects the complete dedication of resources and values needed for an organization to optimize its relationships with customers: “Only one who devotes himself to a cause with his whole strength and soul can be a true master.” Mastery requires, as well, a storehouse of experience coming from experimentation; so, just like in the pole vault and high jump, we can expect that the customer-centricity bar will continue to be raised.

Most Twitter Users Follow Brands

A new report from Edison Research’s Arbitron/Edison Internet and Multimedia Series, Twitter Usage In America: 2010, contains all sorts of interesting Twitter facts. It presents three years of tracking data from a nationally representative telephone survey of 1,753 Americans conducted in February 2010.

A new report from Edison Research’s Arbitron/Edison Internet and Multimedia Series, Twitter Usage In America: 2010, contains all sorts of interesting Twitter facts. It presents three years of tracking data from a nationally representative telephone survey of 1,753 Americans conducted in February 2010.

A key finding for marketers: Fifty-one percent of Twitter users said they follow at least one brand on a social network, according to the report. That number drops to just 16 percent for users of all social networks.

What’s more, 42 percent of Twitter users said they use the tool to learn about products or services, and 41 percent said they use it to provide opinions about them. Twenty-eight percent said they use Twitter to look for sales or discounts, 21 percent use it to purchase products or services, and 19 percent use it to seek customer support.

Here are some other key findings from the report:

  • Awareness of Twitter has exploded from 5 percent of Americans age 12 and over in 2008 to 87 pecent in 2010. By comparison, Facebook’s awareness is 88 percent.
  • Despite near equal awareness, Twitter trails Facebook significantly in usage: 7 percent of Americans (17 million people) actively use Twitter, while 41 percent maintain a profile page on Facebook.
  • Nearly two-thirds of active Twitter users access social networking sites using a mobile phone.
  • Blacks make up nearly one-quarter of the U.S. Twitter population, twice their share of the total population of the country. In contrast, whites make up more than 69 percent of internet users, but about one-half of Twitter users.

The report said that high usage in the black community could be related to the mobile nature of Twitter. While many users update their status with a PC, mobile devices are a major conduit of microblog posts. Research shows that blacks and Hispanics are both more likely than whites to use the mobile web, especially among younger users.

Pretty interesing stuff. Were you surprised by any of these findings? If so, please leave a comment below.