Back-to-School Shopping Season Is Here, Marketers

Welcome to the second biggest shopping season of the year: It’s Back-to-School season and it’s promising to be a good one. According to a survey conducted by Synchrony Financial of parents of K-12 students, parents of college students, and college students themselves, parents are pretty upbeat about the economy and their own financial situation this year.

Welcome to the second biggest shopping season of the year: It’s Back-to-School season and it’s promising to be a good one. According to a survey conducted by Synchrony Financial of parents of K-12 students, parents of college students, and college students themselves, parents are pretty upbeat about the economy and their own financial situation this year. More than half (53 percent) of parents of K-12 kids expect to spend more this year than last year.

This is good news, and is driving an expected increase of back-to-school spending between 3.7 percent and 4.1 percent (This growth forecast for the three-month Back-to-School shopping period of July-Sept. 2017 is based on analysis of macroeconomic variables and trends).

Credit: Synchrony Financial

What is driving this increase? One reason could be that parents of K-12 kids are feeling confident about their jobs and pretty good about their financial situation. Sixty three percent of parents say their financial situation has improved this year, and three quarters feel confident about their jobs. That’s a 10 point jump from last year, when only 53 percent of parents felt this level of confidence.

So, parents are feeling like they can spend more on deserving offspring who have done Vulcan mind-melds with the pool and video games over the long summer. What will they spend money on? Clothing is the number one item. Kids tend to grow, and clothes that fit them last year won’t work — and older siblings’ clothes only go so far. Ninety-four percent of parents of K-12 youngsters are expecting to spend money on everyday clothes, totaling about $183 on average.

But that’s not the big growth item. The biggest growth category is electronics. Forty-five percent of parents are expecting to spend more money than last year on computers and electronics. Also, 46 percent of them say the supply list from schools have gone up, leading to spending more on notebooks, markers and other supplies.

How about parents of college kids and college kids themselves? They are not as optimistic about the economy and their own financial situations because, well, they’re paying for college. That takes quite a bite out of the family nest egg. Only 40 percent of college students say they feel confident about their overall financial situation, and only 15 percent are confident in the strength of the economy. That does put a damper on spending on discretionary items.

But, at least they’re done growing, right? No need to spend a ton of money on clothes and shoes, but college kids and their parents are spending a good amount of money on other items. The data shows that parents of college age students spend about $205 on average on electronics, but less on clothing and shoes for back-to-school. Forty-five percent of college parents are expecting to spend more on computers than last year, similar to K-12 parents.

So, when is all this spending happening? If you think college students procrastinate in shopping, similar to how they do their college papers, you would be absolutely right. About 70 percent of parents of kids K-12 are done spending by the end of July. But half of college students don’t start until after August. Almost 30 percent of them wait until after Aug. 15. Hey, at least it gets done, right?

Will this level of confidence and spend extend to the holiday season as well? It’s too early to tell at this point, but this is a beacon of hope, in a sea of bleak news in the current retail marketing landscape.

Note: The views expressed in this blog are those of the blogger and not necessarily of Synchrony Financial. All references to consumers and population refer to the survey respondents.

Getting the Most Out of Back-to-School Marketing

So, how should marketers redefine their back-to-school efforts to capitalize this time of year? To capture peoples’ interests during the active summer season, marketers must incorporate multichannel efforts to facilitate on- and offline engagement. Search continues to be a proven marketing channel, while implementing social and mobile marketing efforts has shown extensive promise, particularly for back-to-school retailers offering special deals and promotions.

As summer hits its peak, shoppers begin to think about heading back to school and retailers attempt to redefine the back-to-school season. Staples recently declared that the “official” back-to-school season starts on July 14, for example.

However, this time of year is less about defining specific dates and more about redefining ways to reach the right audience at the right connection points. Earlier this month, for example, Google reported that back-to-school queries increased 15 percent compared to the same period in 2008, and that searches on back-to-school shopping usually uptick in June with search activity lasting through late September.

The expanse in the back-to-school shopping season can be attributed in part to the 49 percent of back-to-school shoppers planning to spread out their purchases in order to distribute the cost over a longer period of time, according to a survey by PriceGrabber.

So, how should marketers redefine their back-to-school efforts to capitalize this time of year? To capture peoples’ interests during the active summer season, marketers must incorporate multichannel efforts to facilitate on- and offline engagement. Search continues to be a proven marketing channel, while implementing social and mobile marketing efforts has shown extensive promise, particularly for back-to-school retailers offering special deals and promotions.

In “S-Net (The Impact of Social Media),” a recent report from ROI Research, sponsored by my firm, Performics, when asked which types of content respondents would be interested in receiving from companies on social networks, 49 percent said they look for printable coupons on Facebook while 50 percent of those on Twitter seek notification of sales or special deals.

With these findings in mind, marketers should consider using social networks like Facebook and Twitter to promote special offers on back-to-school items to drive people in-store. Mobile marketing is another effective channel for back-to-school offers. It provides marketers with a more direct way to ensure purchase consideration through the use of text alerts or mobile coupons, in addition to complementary efforts in search and social marketing.

Performics helps clients prepare their back-to-school multichannel marketing efforts on a variety of levels. We recently teamed with one leading technology company to roll out its back-to-school marketing campaigns in early June, using some innovative tactics to capture audiences. For the first time, we implemented vanity display URLs and Google sitelinks in search campaigns to draw shoppers to the client’s back-to-school offerings. Our team also built a list of seasonal keywords around coupons, deals and discounts, supplemented by heavy social marketing campaigns promoting back-to-school products.

Another client, a popular apparel retailer, launched its back-to-school promotions in early July in anticipation of sales increases peaking at the end of this month. It offered shoppers the chance to receive a free smartphone if they purchased online or tried on featured clothes in-store. Advertising online via Facebook campaigns and paid search during back-to-school season, the retailer is coordinating on- and offline efforts by also offering free shipping and 30 percent off on back-to-school items.

Overall, marketers that successfully integrate multichannel efforts stand the best chance of getting the most bang out of their back-to-school buck. Marketers should look to engage back-to-school shoppers through various touchpoints throughout the season, not just at the end of August. Most importantly, manage expectations accordingly and measure marketing efforts often to reap the most reward.

Determining how shoppers respond to back-to-school campaigns and following trends throughout the season can also help brands set successful strategies for the upcoming winter holiday season. — Special thanks to contributing authors Andrea Vannucci and Maren Wesley.

Getting the Most Out of “Back-to-School” Marketing

As summer hits its peak, shoppers have begun to think about heading back to school and retailers are attempting to redefine the back-to-school season.

As summer hits its peak, shoppers have begun to think about heading back to school and retailers are attempting to redefine the back-to-school season. For example, Staples recently declared that the “official” back-to-school season starts on July 14. However, this time of year is less about defining specific dates and more about redefining ways to reach the right audience at the right connection points.

Earlier this month, Google reported that “back-to-school” queries increased 15 percent compared to the same period in 2008, and that searches on back-to-school shopping usually uptick in June with search activity lasting through late September. The expanse of the back-to-school shopping season can be attributed in part to the 49 percent of back-to-school shoppers planning to spread out their purchases in order to distribute the cost over a longer period of time, according to a survey by PriceGrabber.com.

So, how should marketers redefine their back-to-school efforts to capitalize on this time of year? To capture peoples’ interests during the active summer season, marketers must incorporate multichannel efforts to facilitate on- and offline engagement. Search continues to be a proven marketing channel, while implementing social and mobile marketing efforts has shown extensive promise, particularly for back-to-school retailers offering special deals and promotions.

In “S-Net (The Impact of Social Media),” a recent report from ROI Research, sponsored by Performics (my firm), when asked which types of content they’d be interested in receiving from companies on social networks, 49 percent of respondents said they look for printable coupons on Facebook while 50 percent of those on Twitter seek notification of sales or special deals. With these findings in mind, marketers should consider using social networks like Facebook and Twitter to promote special offers on back-to-school items to drive people to their stores.

Mobile marketing is another effective channel for back-to-school offers. It provides a more direct way to ensure purchase consideration through the use of text alerts or mobile coupons, in addition to complementary efforts in search and social marketing.

Performics helps clients prepare their back-to-school multichannel marketing efforts on a variety of levels. We recently teamed with one leading technology company to roll out its back-to-school marketing in early June, and turned to some innovative tactics to capture audiences. For the first time, we implemented vanity display URLs and Google sitelinks in search campaigns to draw shoppers to its back-to-school offerings. Our team also built a list of seasonal keywords around coupons, deals and discounts, supplemented by heavy social marketing campaigns promoting back-to-school products.

Another client, a popular apparel retailer, launched its back-to-school promotions in early July in anticipation of sales peaking at the end of this month. The retailer’s promotion offers the chance to receive a free smartphone when you purchase online or try on featured clothes in-store. Advertising online through Facebook campaigns and paid search during back-to-school season, the retailer is coordinating on- and offline efforts by also offering free shipping and 30 percent off back-to-school items.

Overall, marketers that successfully integrate multichannel efforts stand the best chance of getting the most bang for their back-to-school buck. Marketers should look to engage with back-to-school shoppers throughout the season, not just at the end of August, and through various touchpoints. Most importantly, manage expectations accordingly and measure marketing efforts often to reap the most reward.

Determining how shoppers respond to back-to-school campaigns and following trends throughout the season can also help brands set successful strategies for the upcoming winter holiday season.

Special thanks to contributing authors Andrea Vannucci and Maren Wesley.

What Mom’s Thinking About Back-to-School Shopping

If you’re in online marketing today, you’re probably interested in how moms are shopping online, right?

If you’re in online marketing today, you’re probably interested in how moms are shopping online, right?

Moms have become a force to be reckoned with. More than 34 million are online — participating in social networking, researching products, making purchases and absorbing as much information as possible — according to a June 2009 report from eMarketer. And most marketers realize that mothers are usually the key decision makers for family purchases. The activities they participate in across the web influence household purchases greatly.

As a mother myself, I can tell you that I pull out all the stops when it comes to spending money on my kids, regardless of how tough the times may be. So the back-to-school market in particular can take on even greater value during down times like these.

So, what are moms thinking about back-to-school shopping? Despite the down economy, few plan to spend less than they did last year on back-to-school purchases, according to a survey of 1,400 mothers of school-age children across the country conducted by Mom Central Consulting, a Newton, Mass.-based social media agency that focuses on marketing to moms.

Findings from the study include the following:
* While 91 percent of moms worry about the expense of back-to-school shopping, only 17 percent anticipate spending less than they did in 2008. Nearly 50 percent anticipate spending much more than last year.
* 40 percent of moms doubt they’ll meet their kids’ expectations in order to save money; 38 percent expect to sacrifice by shopping generic over brand names.
* 92 percent of moms plan to save money by looking for special offers, both offline and online; 80 percent will use coupons, and 74 percent will reuse items from previous years.
* 32 percent of moms also expressed concern over how to balance their kids’ expectations and desires with today’s fiscal realities.

As a result, many moms will pursue shopping strategies like buying in bulk (46 percent) and making purchases at discount retailers like Wal-Mart (61 percent) and Target (57 percent).

Are you doing anything special to reach online moms during this back-to-school season? If so, let us know by posting a comment here.

What Mom’s Thinking About Back-to-School Shopping

If you’re in online marketing today, you’re probably interested in how moms are shopping online, right?

If you’re in online marketing today, you’re probably interested in how moms are shopping online, right?

Moms have become a force to be reckoned with. More than 34 million are online — participating in social networking, researching products, making purchases and absorbing as much information as possible — according to a June 2009 report from eMarketer. And most marketers realize that mothers are usually the key decision makers for family purchases. The activities they participate in across the web influence household purchases greatly.

So, what are moms thinking about back-to-school shopping? Despite the down economy, few plan to spend less than they did last year on back-to-school purchases, according to a survey of 1,400 mothers of school-age children across the country conducted by Mom Central Consulting, a Newton, Mass.-based social media agency that focuses on marketing to moms.

Findings from the study include the following:
* While 91 percent of moms worry about the expense of back-to-school shopping, only 17 percent anticipate spending less than they did in 2008. Nearly 50 percent anticipate spending much more than last year.
* 40 percent of moms doubt they’ll meet their kids’ expectations in order to save money; 38 percent expect to sacrifice by shopping generic over brand names.
* 92 percent of moms plan to save money by looking for special offers, both offline and online; 80 percent will use coupons, and 74 percent will reuse items from previous years.
* 32 percent of moms also expressed concern over how to balance their kids’ expectations and desires with today’s fiscal realities.

As a result, many moms will pursue shopping strategies like buying in bulk (46 percent) and making purchases at discount retailers like Wal-Mart (61 percent) and Target (57 percent).

Are you doing anything special to reach online moms during this back-to-school season? If so, let us know by posting a comment here.