How I’m Creating Leads and Sales on LinkedIn

The biggest mistake most of us are making when promoting content within a LinkedIn Group is sharing a link back to what we’ve published. Instead, success depends on your ability to use what you already know works within the walls of LinkedIn Groups and, ultimately, getting prospects off of social media. Yes, I’m serious. I’m living proof. I’ve been using LinkedIn to create leads and actual sales with good success.

The biggest mistake most of us are making when promoting content within a LinkedIn Group is sharing a link back to what we’ve published. Instead, success depends on your ability to use what you already know works within the walls of LinkedIn Groups and, ultimately, getting prospects off of social media. Yes, I’m serious. I’m living proof. I’ve been using LinkedIn to create leads and actual sales with good success.

Most of us believe that setting up an engaging LinkedIn group or attractive profile is the key to success for businesses or job seekers. But it’s just not true. Finding crafty ways to mention your blogs, webinars or new product releases within LinkedIn rarely works—produces appointments, leads or sales.

The key to success is founded in creative thinking about what you already know works and getting your target market off of social media. Here’s proof—in the form of my experience and how you can do the same.

Step 1: Create Content That Provokes
I recently decided to go after a niche: small- to mid-sized kitchen cabinet dealerships who need help using LinkedIn for sales. My goal was to create sales of my book and leads for my social sales training product. My strategy was to get people already engaged in discussions relevant to the pain I can cure to actually leave LinkedIn and register at my site, call me on the phone or buy my book.

First, I created content that I knew would scratch the itch of my market. I baited my hook. I interviewed an industry expert who had something truly different to say about how successful kitchen cabinet dealers are using social media and using LinkedIn for sales leads.

What my expert had to say was contrarian, valuable, provocative and actionable. This part was key. This was the barb in the hook.

Step 2: Locate Qualified Discussions
I then published a handful of stories and audio interviews featuring my guest, Jim, discussing how successful home improvement businesses are using social media to create leads and sales. He didn’t talk about how they should be using Twitter, Facebook, blogs and such. Instead, he spoke on how they are and gave readers/listeners the chance to learn how they can do the same. He told them how to take action.

I then carefully joined related LinkedIn groups, taking care to make sure I was clear about my intent to join. I had something honestly valuable to share—actionable insights on a topic that is of current interest to group members.

I joined and waited. Within a few days I spotted a discussion on a Kitchen Cabinet industry group where I could answer a question in a way that “brought to life” the specific valuable answers my guest expert was offering … but not in the usual way.

Step 3: Tease Prospects Into Action
The biggest mistake most of us are making when promoting content within a LinkedIn group is sharing a link back to what we’ve published. You see, the minute I stopped sharing links and started saying less the more action I got—the more people did what I wanted them to do (visit my site and become a lead).

Ultimately it’s all about getting prospects off of social media (and on a lead-nurturing system). How you go about doing that is critical when using Linkedin. You don’t want to waste time!

Bottom line: The more I’m baiting people—teasing them—the more I’m getting emailed directly through LinkedIn from hungry customers who want to connect, become a lead or buy a product on-the-spot.

Sure, my website is good at selling products and capturing leads—that requirement doesn’t go away. Remember your job is to tease your audience into taking action on something that you already know they want to act on.

I didn’t get paid by “telling a story” or “providing valuable content” or educating my target market. That’s social media guru blather. I ethically bribed my customers into taking action on something that they wanted to take action on to begin with. I then gave them full satisfaction—useful, actionable answers to burning questions they had.

Next up, I’ll explain exactly how I did it in more detail. See you then!