Political Direct Mail for the Win!

During the 2016 election cycle, there was more political direct mail than ever before. The United States Postal Service and The American Association of Political Consultants (AAPC) wanted to see how people viewed political mail, so they did a study about direct mail and its impact on voters. There are so many takeaways that can help you create political direct mail to win.

During the 2016 election cycle, there was more political direct mail than ever before. The United States Postal Service and The American Association of Political Consultants (AAPC) wanted to see how people viewed political mail, so they did a study about direct mail and its impact on voters. There are so many takeaways that can help you create political direct mail to win.

In 2018 we often get asked, does direct mail still work? YES! Here are a few facts about direct mail to show you the power you can harness:

  • People check their mail at the first opportunity, which is nearly every day. You can reach your voters in a timely fashion without being forgotten.
  • 86% of people go through the mail and make sure that nothing of value is being thrown out.
  • 73% of people prefer direct mail over other marketing channels.
  • Mail may be the best way to share new information about you as a candidate or an issue.

Radio and television do not allow you to target your prospects effectively. Your message ends up in front of people who cannot even vote for you. With direct mail, you have access directly to people who are able to vote for you. Take advantage of it! You can segment them into types of voters, propensity to vote and so much more.

When sending direct mail to voters, include important information about the election, such as voting deadlines for absentee ballots. Yes, you can target people who vote absentee with a different message than people who vote at the polls. You can also provide registration deadline information. Of course, include in the mail piece who you are, what you stand for and why people should vote for you. People keep mail that provides important information; get your mailer to stick around longer.

When polled about political mail voters responded with:

  • 82% want to know where the candidate stands on issues
  • 74% want a contrast with an opponent on issues
  • 73% want to know a candidate’s voting record and any past statements made
  • 60% want to see a list of who endorses the candidate.

We suggest that you use large format mailers to grab attention. According to a DMA 2017 response rate report, oversized pieces have been shown to increase response rates by 10.4%, producing the best overall response rate. You need to keep your text concise and easily scanned. Use bold, color and contrast to draw the eye to your important content. The easier you make it for people to quickly understand what you are saying, the better you are able to get your point across. Direct mail is better understood, remembered and acted upon more than digital channels. Add direct mail to your marketing mix to harness the votes you need to win.

Want to increase the time people spend with your mail pieces? Make them interactive. Add elements such as video, augmented reality, die cuts or endless folds to engage people. Video allows you as a candidate to speak directly to each voter about how you stand on issues and how you are different from other candidates. You can add special coatings or textures to really enhance the sensory reach of your mail piece. There are so many fun ways that direct mail can stand out that no other channel can do.

Are you ready to get started on your campaign?

How to Be a Good Data Scientist

I guess no one wants to be a plain “Analyst” anymore; now “Data Scientist” is the title of the day. Then again, I never thought that there was anything wrong with titles like “Secretary,” “Stewardess” or “Janitor,” either. But somehow, someone decided “Administrative Assistant” should replace “Secretary” completely, and that someone was very successful in that endeavor. So much so that, people actually get offended when they are called “Secretaries.” The same goes for “Flight Attendants.” If you want an extra bag of peanuts or the whole can of soda with ice on the side, do not dare to call any service personnel by the outdated title. The verdict is still out for the title “Janitor,” as it could be replaced by “Custodial Engineer,” “Sanitary Engineer,” “Maintenance Technician,” or anything that gives an impression that the job requirement includes a degree in engineering. No matter. When the inflation-adjusted income of salaried workers is decreasing, I guess the number of words in the job title should go up instead. Something’s got to give, right?

I guess no one wants to be a plain “Analyst” anymore; now “Data Scientist” is the title of the day. Then again, I never thought that there was anything wrong with titles like “Secretary,” “Stewardess” or “Janitor,” either. But somehow, someone decided “Administrative Assistant” should replace “Secretary” completely, and that someone was very successful in that endeavor. So much so that, people actually get offended when they are called “Secretaries.” The same goes for “Flight Attendants.” If you want an extra bag of peanuts or the whole can of soda with ice on the side, do not dare to call any service personnel by the outdated title. The verdict is still out for the title “Janitor,” as it could be replaced by “Custodial Engineer,” “Sanitary Engineer,” “Maintenance Technician,” or anything that gives an impression that the job requirement includes a degree in engineering. No matter. When the inflation-adjusted income of salaried workers is decreasing, I guess the number of words in the job title should go up instead. Something’s got to give, right?

Please do not ask me to be politically correct here. As an openly Asian person in America, I am not even sure why I should be offended when someone addresses me as an “Oriental.” Someone explained it to me a long time ago. The word is reserved for “things,” not for people. OK, then. I will be offended when someone knowingly addresses me as an Oriental, now that the memo has been out for a while. So, do me this favor and do not call me an Oriental (at least in front of my face), and I promise that I will not call anyone an “Occidental” in return.

In any case, anyone who touches data for living now wants to be called a Data Scientist. Well, the title is longer than one word, and that is a good start. Did anyone get a raise along with that title inflation? I highly doubt it. But I’ve noticed the qualifications got much longer and more complicated.

I have seen some job requirements for data scientists that call for “all” of the following qualifications:

  • A master’s degree in statistics or mathematics; able to build statistical models proficiently using R or SAS
  • Strong analytical and storytelling skills
  • Hands-on knowledge in technologies such as Hadoop, Java, Python, C++, NoSQL, etc., being able to manipulate the data any which way, independently
  • Deep knowledge in ETL (extract, transform and load) to handle data from all sources
  • Proven experience in data modeling and database design
  • Data visualization skills using whatever tools that are considered to be cool this month
  • Deep business/industry/domain knowledge
  • Superb written and verbal communication skills, being able to explain complex technical concepts in plain English
  • Etc. etc…

I actually cut this list short, as it is already becoming ridiculous. I just want to see the face of a recruiter who got the order to find super-duper candidates based on this list—at the same salary level as a Senior Statistician (another fine title). Heck, while we’re at it, why don’t we add that the candidate must look like Brad Pitt and be able to tap-dance, too? The long and the short of it is maybe some executive wanted to hire just “1” data scientist with all these skillsets, hoping to God that this mad scientist will be able to make sense out of mounds of unstructured and unorganized data all on her own, and provide business answers without even knowing what the question was in the first place.

Over the years, I have worked with many statisticians, analysts and programmers (notice that they are all one-word titles), dealing with large, small, clean, dirty and, at times, really dirty data (hence the title of this series, “Big Data, Small Data, Clean Data, Messy Data”). And navigating through all those data has always been a team effort.

Yes, there are some exceptional musicians who can write music and lyrics, sing really well, play all instruments, program sequencers, record, mix, produce and sell music—all on their own. But if you insist that only such geniuses can produce music, there won’t be much to listen to in this world. Even Stevie Wonder, who can write and sing, and play keyboards, drums and harmonicas, had close to 100 names on the album credits in his heyday. Yes, the digital revolution changed the music scene as much as the data industry in terms of team sizes, but both aren’t and shouldn’t be one-man shows.

So, if being a “Data Scientist” means being a super businessman/analyst/statistician who can program, build models, write, present and sell, we should all just give up searching for one in the near future within your budget. Literally, we may be able to find a few qualified candidates in the job market on a national level. Too bad that every industry report says we need tens of thousands of them, right now.

Conversely, if it is just a bloated new title for good old data analysts with some knowledge in statistical applications and the ability to understand business needs—yeah, sure. Why not? I know plenty of those people, and we can groom more of them. And I don’t even mind giving them new long-winded titles that are suitable for the modern business world and peer groups.

I have been in the data business for a long time. And even before the datasets became really large, I have always maintained the following division of labor when dealing with complex data projects involving advanced analytics:

  • Business Analysts
  • Programmers/Developers
  • Statistical Analysts

The reason is very simple: It is extremely difficult to be a master-level expert in just one of these areas. Out of hundreds of statisticians who I’ve worked with, I can count only a handful of people who even “tried” to venture into the business side. Of those, even fewer successfully transformed themselves into businesspeople, and they are now business owners of consulting practices or in positions with “Chief” in their titles (Chief Data Officer or Chief Analytics Officer being the title du jour).

On the other side of the spectrum, less than a 10th of decent statisticians are also good at coding to manipulate complex data. But even they are mostly not good enough to be completely independent from professional programmers or developers. The reality is, most statisticians are not very good at setting up workable samples out of really messy data. Simply put, handling data and developing analytical frameworks or models call for different mindsets on a professional level.

The Business Analysts, I think, are the closest to the modern-day Data Scientists; albeit that the ones in the past were less so technicians, due to available toolsets back then. Nevertheless, granted that it is much easier to teach business aspects to statisticians or developers than to convert businesspeople or marketers into coders (no offense, but true), many of these “in-between” people—between the marketing world and technology world, for example—are rooted in the technology world (myself included) or at least have a deep understanding of it.

At times labeled as Research Analysts, they are the folks who would:

  • Understand the business requirements and issues at hand
  • Prescribe suitable solutions
  • Develop tangible analytical projects
  • Perform data audits
  • Procure data from various sources
  • Translate business requirements into technical specifications
  • Oversee the progress as project managers
  • Create reports and visual presentations
  • Interpret the results and create “stories”
  • And present the findings and recommended next steps to decision-makers

Sounds complex? You bet it is. And I didn’t even list all the job functions here. And to do this job effectively, these Business/Research Analysts (or Data Scientists) must understand the technical limitations of all related areas, including database, statistics, and general analytics, as well as industry verticals, uniqueness of business models and campaign/transaction channels. But they do not have to be full-blown statisticians or coders; they just have to know what they want and how to ask for it clearly. If they know how to code as well, great. All the more power to them. But that would be like a cherry on top, as the business mindset should be in front of everything.

So, now that the data are bigger and more complex than ever in human history, are we about to combine all aspects of data and analytics business and find people who are good at absolutely everything? Yes, various toolsets made some aspects of analysts’ lives easier and simpler, but not enough to get rid of the partitions between positions completely. Some third basemen may be able to pitch, too. But they wouldn’t go on the mound as starting pitchers—not on a professional level. And yes, analysts who advance up through the corporate and socioeconomic ladder are the ones who successfully crossed the boundaries. But we shouldn’t wait for the ones who are masters of everything. Like I said, even Stevie Wonder needs great sound engineers.

Then, what would be a good path to find Data Scientists in the existing pool of talent? I have been using the following four evaluation criteria to identify individuals with upward mobility in the technology world for a long time. Like I said, it is a lot simpler and easier to teach business aspects to people with technical backgrounds than the other way around.

So let’s start with the techies. These are the qualities we need to look for:

1. Skills: When it comes to the technical aspect of it, the skillset is the most important criterion. Generally a person has it, or doesn’t have it. If we are talking about a developer, how good is he? Can he develop a database without wasting time? A good coder is not just a little faster than mediocre ones; he can be 10 to 20 times faster. I am talking about the ones who don’t have to look through some manual or the Internet every five minutes, but the ones who just know all the shortcuts and options. The same goes for statistical analysts. How well is she versed in all the statistical techniques? Or is she a one-trick pony? How is her track record? Are her models performing in the market for a prolonged time? The thing about statistical work is that time is the ultimate test; we eventually get to find out how well the prediction holds up in the real world.

2. Attitude: This is a very important aspect, as many techies are locked up in their own little world. Many are socially awkward, like characters in Dilbert or “Big Bang Theory,” and most much prefer to deal with the machines (where things are clean-cut binary) than people (well, humans can be really annoying). Some do not work well with others and do not know how to compromise at all, as they do not know how to look at the world from a different perspective. And there are a lot of lazy ones. Yes, lazy programmers are the ones who are more motivated to automate processes (primarily to support their laissez faire lifestyle), but the ones who blow the deadlines all the time are just too much trouble for the team. In short, a genius with a really bad attitude won’t be able to move to the business or the management side, regardless of the IQ score.

3. Communication: Many technical folks are not good at written or verbal communications. I am not talking about just the ones who are foreign-born (like me), even though most technically oriented departments are full of them. The issue is many technical people (yes, even the ones who were born and raised in the U.S., speaking English) do not communicate with the rest of the world very well. Many can’t explain anything without using technical jargon, nor can they summarize messages to decision-makers. Businesspeople don’t need to hear the life story about how complex the project was or how messy the data sets were. Conversely, many techies do not understand marketers or businesspeople who speak plain English. Some fail to grasp the concept that human beings are not robots, and most mortals often fail to communicate every sentence as a logical expression. When a marketer says “Omit customers in New York and New Jersey from the next campaign,” the coder on the receiving end shouldn’t take that as a proper Boolean logic. Yes, obviously a state cannot be New York “and” New Jersey at the same time. But most humans don’t (or can’t) distinguish such differences. Seriously, I’ve seen some developers who refuse to work with people whose command of logical expressions aren’t at the level of Mr. Spock. That’s the primary reason we need business analysts or project managers who work as translators between these two worlds. And obviously, the translators should be able to speak both languages fluently.

4. Business Understanding: Granted, the candidates in question are qualified in terms of criteria one through three. Their eagerness to understand the ultimate business goals behind analytical projects would truly set them apart from the rest on the path to become a data scientist. As I mentioned previously, many technically oriented people do not really care much about the business side of the deal, or even have slight curiosity about it. What is the business model of the company for which they are working? How do they make money? What are the major business concerns? What are the long- and short-term business goals of their clients? Why do they lose sleep at night? Before complaining about incomplete data, why are the databases so messy? How are the data being collected? What does all this data mean for their bottom line? Can you bring up the “So what?” question after a great scientific finding? And ultimately, how will we make our clients look good in front of “their” bosses? When we deal with technical issues, we often find ourselves at a crossroad. Picking the right path (or a path with the least amount of downsides) is not just an IT decision, but more of a business decision. The person who has a more holistic view of the world, without a doubt, would make a better decision—even for a minor difference in a small feature, in terms of programming. Unfortunately, it is very difficult to find such IT people who have a balanced view.

And that is the punchline. We want data scientists who have the right balance of business and technical acumen—not just jacks of all trades who can do all the IT and analytical work all by themselves. Just like business strategy isn’t solely set by a data strategist, data projects aren’t done by one super techie. What we need are business analysts or data scientists who truly “get” the business goals and who will be able to translate them into functional technical specifications, with an understanding of all the limitations of each technology piece that is to be employed—which is quite different from being able to do it all.

If the career path for a data scientist ultimately leads to Chief Data Officer or Chief Analytics Officer, it is important for the candidates to understand that such “chief” titles are all about the business, not the IT. As soon as a CDO, CAO or CTO start representing technology before business, that organization is doomed. They should be executives who understand the technology and employ it to increase profit and efficiency for the whole company. Movie directors don’t necessarily write scripts, hold the cameras, develop special effects or act out scenes. But they understand all aspects of the movie-making process and put all the resources together to create films that they envision. As soon as a director falls too deep into just one aspect, such as special effects, the resultant movie quickly becomes an unwatchable bore. Data business is the same way.

So what is my advice for young and upcoming data scientists? Master the basics and be a specialist first. Pick a field that fits your aptitude, whether it be programming, software development, mathematics or statistics, and try to be really good at it. But remain curious about other related IT fields.

Then travel the world. Watch lots of movies. Read a variety of books. Not just technical books, but books about psychology, sociology, philosophy, science, economics and marketing, as well. This data business is inevitably related to activities that generate revenue for some organization. Try to understand the business ecosystem, not just technical systems. As marketing will always be a big part of the Big Data phenomenon, be an educated consumer first. Then look at advertisements and marketing campaigns from the promotor’s point of view, not just from an annoyed consumer’s view. Be an informed buyer through all available channels, online or offline. Then imagine how the world will be different in the future, and how a simple concept of a monetary transaction will transform along with other technical advances, which will certainly not stop at ApplePay. All of those changes will turn into business opportunities for people who understand data. If you see some real opportunities, try to imagine how you would create a startup company around them. You will quickly realize answering technical challenges is not even the half of building a viable business model.

If you are already one of those data scientists, live up to that title and be solution-oriented, not technology-oriented. Don’t be a slave to technologies, or be whom we sometimes address as a “data plumber” (who just moves data from one place to another). Be a master who wields data and technology to provide useful answers. And most importantly, don’t be evil (like Google says), and never do things just because you can. Always think about the social consequences, as actions based on data and technology affect real people, often negatively (more on this subject in future article). If you want to ride this Big Data wave for the foreseeable future, try not to annoy people who may not understand all the ins and outs of the data business. Don’t be the guy who spoils it for everyone else in the industry.

A while back, I started to see the unemployment rate as a rate of people who are being left behind during the progress (if we consider technical innovations as progress). Every evolutionary stage since the Industrial Revolution created gaps between supply and demand of new skillsets required for the new world. And this wave is not going to be an exception. It is unfortunate that, in this age of a high unemployment rate, we have such hard times finding good candidates for high tech positions. On one side, there are too many people who were educated under the old paradigm. And on the other side, there are too few people who can wield new technologies and apply them to satisfy business needs. If this new title “Data Scientist” means the latter, then yes. We need more of them, for sure. But we all need to be more realistic about how to groom them, as it would take a village to do so. And if we can’t even agree on what the job description for a data scientist should be, we will need lots of luck developing armies of them.

3 Essential Questions to Ask Social Media Candidates for Hire

I admit these questions are strange. But if you need leads these are THE questions to ask social media candidates. Because social media is a sales tool that will filter leads, you need to hire people or agencies who define success as sales, not just engagement. So, without further ado, here are three “must ask” questions to aim at would-be social marking managers or agency reps—straight from a guy who generated a 400 percent increase in leads in 90 days for call tracking provider, LogMyCalls.

I admit these questions are strange. But if you need leads these are THE questions to ask social media candidates. Because social media is a sales tool that will filter leads, you need to hire people or agencies who define success as sales, not just engagement.

So, without further ado, here are three “must ask” questions to aim at would-be social marking managers or agency reps—straight from a guy who generated a 400 percent increase in leads in 90 days for call tracking provider, LogMyCalls.

  1. What questions do you have of ME?
  2. Give me 10 blog post titles you would write about us, right now, please.
  3. How will you track your success as a social/content marketer?

McKay Allen of LogMyCalls.com is a one-man social media lead generation powerhouse. So I asked him: How can folks hire someone as good as he is? How can an employer lower the risk of hiring an unproductive resource?

Here are more details on the questions he shared with me, raw and unfiltered.

No. 1: What Questions Do You Have of ME?
This one can really throw social media candidates. They’ll either swing and miss, or hit a home run. Point being, good candidates will ask you questions that reveal how they think. Bad ones won’t.

Asking questions of you also shows how they would act if you employed them.

“I want them to ask me questions about our lead generation strategy, and how our blog fits into our lead generation strategy,” says Allen.

“When we hire new content marketing people here at LogMyCalls, I want to hear these types of questions … they should ask, ‘How many leads does LogMyCalls generate each week from the blog? How many leads do you want to generate each week from the blog?'”

Allen says these kinds of questions demonstrate how a candidate, “truly views a blog as more than a place to write stuff. It is a tool to generate leads.”

He’s brutally honest about the importance of questions coming at you from candidates.

“As an employer, I wouldn’t consider hiring someone that didn’t have any questions for me,” Allen says.

No. 2: Give Me 10 Blog Post Titles, Please
“This will put them on the spot, but it is a critical question to ask,” says Allen.

Indeed. If your candidates have experience in writing blog post titles that sell they’ll be able to provide you with:

  • Concepts for articles that are “how to” and problem solving oriented (focused on your customers’ pain and/or goals)
  • Titles that exploit proven copywriting rules by getting prospects to take action

Allen says the social media candidate, “should be able to, very quickly, come up with 10 blog post titles they could write about NOW. Obviously this presupposes that they’re educated on what the company does.”

No. 3: How Will You Track Your Success as a Content Marketer?
Again, Allen is point blank: “The answer should not be based on traffic or YouTube views. Their answer must revolve around leads and phone calls. If they are generating more form fill-outs, phone calls, and revenue for your company, they will be successful. If they’re only interested in Facebook ‘Likes’ for example, it just won’t work.”

Be warned: Many candidates are reluctant to use such measurable, bottomline-oriented performance metrics. They’ll often overuse the word “engagement” when responding.

Be strong. Hang in there. You’ll probably need to burn through a bunch of candidates before you find a gem or two.

Have Candidates Show You the Goods
A good social media manager or content marketing pro will produce leads and sales. Period. So how can you to hire someone that will, with some certainty, work out?

Allen says hire someone who will clearly demonstrate an ability to write articles, videos and other content that produced leads.

  • Get writing samples and look for calls-to-action within them.
  • Verify they produced leads as best you can with prior employers or clients.

“You also want to make sure that this person is okay writing and engaging with people online all day every day,” says Allen who recommends exploring former journalists or copywriters.

McKay Allen is a social media lead generation rockstar worth following. He says biggest way to lessen a hiring risk is to have applicants produce content for you in a short period of time during the interview.

“For example, give them 20 minutes to write a blog post on a certain subject and see how they do … see if they can write quickly, accurately, and cleanly in a very short period of time. This will stress them out, but it will tell you what you need to know.”

Do you have questions to ask social media candidates that work for you? Let me know in comments!

10 Tips to Help Grow Your Twitter Followers

This past Labor Day weekend saw Republican presidential candidates hit the campaign trail, and Twitter was buzzing with location updates, photos and 140-character sound bites. While many of the candidates boast huge Twitter followings, several have come under criticism for the authenticity of their numbers.

This past Labor Day weekend saw Republican presidential candidates hit the campaign trail, and Twitter was buzzing with location updates, photos and 140-character sound bites. While many of the candidates boast huge Twitter followings, several have come under criticism for the authenticity of their numbers.

In fact, a recent review of Newt Gingrich’s followers by PeekYou, a social search company that matches online identities through publically available information, found that only 106,055 out of 1.1 million of his followers were legitimate. Similar results were found for other candidate’s followers, but at much lower rates. Mitt Romney was found to have 26 percent real followers, Michelle Bachman had 28 percent and Tim Pawlenty had 32 percent. With that in mind, here are some best practices for keeping it real when it comes to growing your number of Twitter followers:

1. Mine the database. As always, the best place to start is with your customers. Leverage the knowledge you have about existing customers and prospects in your database and reach out to them communicating the benefits of following your brand on Twitter. Consider sending an email campaign to acquire new subscribers. Remember to tag all existing promotional campaigns, newsletters and service email communications with your social communities.

2. Listen and follow. Leverage listening and monitoring tools such as Radian6 to find out who’s already talking about your brand. Follow them to keep the dialog going and be sure to recognize and thank those that retweet or @mention you.

3. Leverage social tools. Look for and engage key influencers to help spread the word about your brand. Helpful tools include wefollow.com, which helps you to find key influencers within your industry or topics related to your brand. Use Klout and PeerIndex scores to identify who are the most influential. Also look at Twitter’s “Who to Follow” tab for some contextually relevant suggestions on an ongoing basis.

4. Hashtags, advertising tags and Twitter ads. Include hashtags pertaining to popular topics and conversation threads to ensure users interested in similar topics can easily find you. Tag TV, radio and print advertising with your social communities. Use that opportunity to highlight exclusive content prospective followers may find there.

Twitter has and will continue to develop new opportunities to help marketers call greater attention to their brand. The most recent announcement includes Twitter’s expanded advertising program, which allows brands to display ads to Twitter users who are following a particular type of company within a vertical niche. This program is similar to promoted tweets highlighted in a user’s timeline.

5. Directories. List your Twitter account in directories such as Twibes.com, TweetFind.com and Twellow.com. Consider building lists on key communication streams so potential followers with similar interests can find you easily.

6. Search tags, bios and backgrounds. Create a bio with a clear description of your brand and the kind of content you plan on posting. If you have several Twitter accounts serving different purposes, make it easy for users to find those as well by listing them or creating a custom background with the address. Add social links to paid search terms to increase visibility and visitation for your social communities. In addition, be sure to promote your social communities on your website. Include your Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Flickr and other communities on each platform. Better yet, use the strengths of each community to create a conversation flow — e.g., break news on Twitter and ask folks to join the conversation on Facebook.

7. Partnerships and sponsorships. Leverage and cross-promote key partnerships and sponsorships. Retweet, @mention and build a dialog with these partners; become a resource for their followers as well.

8. Unique content. Offer followers unique content they can’t find elsewhere. Grant followers “first to know” status, which will keep them tuning in and engaged. Consider building Twitterviews if you have access to individuals that will resonate well with your followers. Challenge users with trivia and reward those who actively engage with recognition. If possible, offer the chance to win prizes.

9. Engaging conversation. As we all know, the best way to grow your followers is to engage your audience with entertaining and valuable content. Ask and answer questions; encourage people to tweet their thoughts and opinions on key issues; address concerns; ask for feedback and input; and be sure to thank those that engage your brand by either direct messaging them or giving a public shout-out for their contribution. Build a communication calendar around engaging content ideas and find a unique voice. By showcasing your most engaged followers, you’ll create an army of advocates for your brand that will help accelerate your growth.

10. Analyze and focus. Leverage social campaign management tools to analyze consumers’ reactions to your content. Create content categories such as news, articles, events and promotions to track responses. Adjust the mix of these categories based on the feedback you receive from your community.

In addition, use your social media campaign management tool or free tools like friendorfollow.com to see who you may be following but isn’t following back. This will help you keep your follow-to-following ratio in check. With a little analytics and creative writing, you can optimize your voice and ultimately your results.

Twitter remains an evolving medium. While most brands have their share of followers who are inactive, there’s much they can do to grow and improve engagement. By paying careful attention to best practices and creating content that’s valued by consumers, you’ll be well on your way to creating a vibrant and engaged community of brand advocates.