7 Direct Mail Best Practices for Food Delivery

It’s been a long hot summer, mercifully drawing to a close. It’s been too hot to make dinner. The thing is, there are only so many times you can go out to eat, or get pizza, or order Chinese. So, the other day, I gathered up some mail I get at the office from food and meal delivery startups. I thought we could try something new.

It’s been a long hot summer, mercifully drawing to a close.

More than a few times, even with our AC on blast, it’s been too hot to make dinner. The thing is, there are only so many times you can go out to eat, or get pizza, or order Chinese.

So, the other day, I gathered up some mail I get at the office from food and meal delivery startups. There’s quite a lot of it, and I thought we could try something new.

But as often happens, I got a good look at how these marketers are using simple direct mail.

1. Reach Out to New Movers

FoodFreshD_01It’s been said a million times, but it bears repeating: New movers are people who represent one of the most potentially valuable segments in life event marketing. They’re ideal prospects for a variety of goods and services as they settle into their new home and neighborhood.

Here, Fresh Direct, a grocery delivery service, smartly welcomes a new mover with a $50 discount. The offer code appears on the back in a coupon.

2. Explain the Process

FoodGraze_01This mailer from Graze, a monthly snack subscription service, shows some of the products it offers. It also numbers and illustrates the steps for a prospect to follow, beginning with an invitation code.

3. Offer an App

FoodDelivery_01Delivery.com is an online marketplace of thousands of restaurants, grocers, among other types of businesses. This mail piece pushes the free app because it makes it easier to order and earn points. To get the customer started, it dangles a 30 percent discount.

Creative Cage Match: Summer Lovin’ Edition

Happy [Belated] First Day of Summer! Time to break out the water wings and SPF 1,000 and enjoy the weather while it lasts. And like any good marketers worth their salt would do, I received a handful of summer-themed emails in my inbox yesterday.

There’s a reason that pro-wrestling is so popular — and it’s not just the juicy drama and bespangled costumes. People love a good fight, and have for millennia, dating back to the gladiators of Rome and beyond.

So, once a month I’m going to select two marketers and toss them into a Creative Cage Match. I’ll be looking at everything ranging from email to direct mail, website to mobile site. It’ll be a mix of objective and subjective, and each time a marketer will walk out of the ring triumphantly.

First Day of SummerHappy [Belated] First Day of Summer! Time to break out the water wings and SPF 1,000 and enjoy the weather while it lasts. And like any good marketers worth their salt would do, I received a handful of summer-themed emails in my inbox yesterday.

In this corner, we have Caviar from Square, Inc. which allows participating restaurants to add delivery service. For consumers in select cities, Caviar enables hungry diners to order either online or via their smartphones from some of their favorite sit-down restaurants. Real-time GPS tracking is provided, so you can keep an eye on your food as you wait for it arrive. And who doesn’t love seeing the bike couriers with the bright orange Caviar packs zipping around the city?

Across the ring we have Designer Shoe Warehouse, better known as DSW to shoe fanatics (cough, cough). DSW operates brick-and-mortar retail locations, as well as an online site, and rewards its shoe lovers with a popular loyalty program.

Email vs. Email

I wanted to see just what these two marketers could come up with in reference to the first day of summer and the sunny months that will follow. Let’s start with DSW:

DSW summer email part 1 DSW summer email part 2DSW kicks off its subject line with the sunshine emoji (appropriate), reading: “☀️Hey, summer! $15.95 & up sandals for the new season.” I need another pair of sandals like I need a hole in my head, but $15.95 and up caught my thrifty shopper’s eye.

Much like last month’s Creative Cage Match competitor ModCloth, DSW plays around with flamingo lawn ornament images, as well as brightly colored sandals. However, I was a little disappointed when I found that, despite clicking on a particular sandal in the image, I just went to the “flip flop and beach sandals” category page.

While the images all looked fantastic and summery and the subject line definitely caught my eye, I felt like the actual content of the email left me hanging. And I wouldn’t call a “flip-flop” a sandal …