A Lie That Keeps You From Success (Part 1 of 3)

“It is easier for the world to accept a simple lie than a complex truth.” The words of 19th centrury historian, Alexis de Tocqueville are even truer today. But not only in the realm of politics. What’s keeping you or your sales team from generating appointments and leads with social selling? Bold, eye-grabbing fibs told by technology vendors and sales trainers whose livelihood depend on adoption of their false inventions. All based on a social media revolution that does not exist.

“It is easier for the world to accept a simple lie than a complex truth.” The words of 19th centrury historian, Alexis de Tocqueville are even truer today. But not only in the realm of politics.

What’s keeping you or your sales team from generating appointments and leads with social selling? Bold, eye-grabbing fibs told by technology vendors and sales trainers whose livelihood depend on adoption of their false inventions. All based on a social media revolution that does not exist.

Get on board, the train is leaving without you! We’ve reinvented sales prospecting and you’re missing out!

But here’s what the gurus (cleverly) don’t tell you: Prospecting best practices remain the same. What works rarely changes. With social selling:

  • your cold calling tactics should evolve a bit—not reinvent themselves
  • LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter, blogs and YouTube don’t replace cold calling—they advance it

Cold calling is alive and thriving. In fact, effective cold call tactics can feed your social selling strategy. Sellers have the chance to improve cold calling and social selling thanks to new tools.

“I often wonder … if the advocates to the ‘death of cold calling’ movement have mixed us a martini using battery acid instead of vermouth and somehow managed to make it pleasing to the palate,” says Kraig Kleeman in a lucid stream of thought on the Association for Talent Development’s LinkedIn group.

5 Signs Your Social Selling Strategy Is a Ticking Bomb
“The (cold calling is dead) argument appears delicious and intoxicating, but somehow its outcome creates a harmfully poisonous effect,” says Kleeman.

He is right. The tsunami of false claims about cold calling being dead can cause you to believe it is a factual reality—and act accordingly. Therein lies the danger.

Believing cold calling is less effective might cause you to rush into social selling and:

  1. Use LinkedIn as a replacement to cold calling—and be banned for using connection requests
  2. Fail to spark conversations with buyers via LinkedIn updates due to misguided tips
  3. Ask for appointments in “first touch” InMail/emails to prospects (big mistake!)
  4. Waste time trying to spark conversations in LinkedIn Groups because of ineffective scripts
  5. Teach ineffective methods to your entire team by hiring a misguided social selling trainer!

Let Social Filter: Trust Your Instincts
What works in cold calling works in social selling. Period. Don’t let any guru tell you otherwise.

An effective cold call produces raw insight on where the buyer is in the decision-making process. If they’re in it at all! It doesn’t set an appointment. It doesn’t ask for a meeting. It is discovery-focused. You’re filtering prospects and placing them in “buckets.”

An effective cold call is brief, blunt and basic. It facilitates to both sides: “Might there be a larger conversation to be had here? Why, when and how?” Done!

The buyer is in control and sets the meeting, demo or call date. Your job is to find the pain—uncover (or confirm) the reason why this prospect might want to talk to you.

Next, your job is to start a journey toward the buyer discovering (for themselves) why they want to talk more. It’s a process, a discipline. That’s why cold calling works so well!

This is the most effective way to approach social selling. First, have a system. Second, focus on the buyer so much they ask you for the next contact—or ask you to stop.

Let social media filter leads for you.

Don’t Do What You’ve Been Told
This may sound crazy, but it’s the best advice I can give. Stop using social media and LinkedIn to:

  • Make initial contact with prospects via LinkedIn connections
  • Send emails/InMails that ask for appointments—overlooking cold call best practices
  • Post updates on LinkedIn without a way to provoke buyers to contact you
  • Comment in LinkedIn groups without a means to spark curiosity in you (get response)
  • Message prospects on LinkedIn using a common group as a reason to speak

If you’re doing any of these, don’t worry. It’s not your fault. Otherwise good people who are looking to ride a wave have given you bad information. Unfortunately, they’re using fear and unbridled enthusiasm as weapons. Just say no.

Boldly Stand-up for the Facts
Kleeman wisely reminds us how the degree of sales productivity can be judged by observing. Take a look at what is going on around you. Notice who is adopting practices based on speculation versus the adoption of fact.

Take a look at the output each group is achieving. (How much money they’re making!)

In other words, are your sales peers being praised as “social selling leaders” simply for “being on” social media? Or are they being financially rewarded based on the facts—how much business they’re winning?

The Best of Both Worlds
Throwing out the old and implementing a very unproven new is hogwash. It’s a lazy strategy based on hot air. Tools like LinkedIn are providing a better way to identify and warm-up cold prospects … and finding “ready to buy” leads. Tons of value there. But …

“Try telling a broker of refurbished airplane parts that raw list cold calling is not a vital activity for revenue capture … try telling a manufacturer of plumbing, HVAC, and home improvement products that cold calling aimed at resellers and end users is ineffective,” says Kleeman.

“You just might need a degree in martial arts or unfettered access to the US military’s drone missile fleet to defend yourself,” he jokes.

Cold calling is alive, thriving and (surprise!) feeding winning social selling strategies. Today is your chance to improve cold calling and social selling thanks to new tools.

Forget about reinventing sales prospecting! Make sure your team has a prospecting strategy that exploits what already works using new social tools.

Left Hand? I’d Like to Introduce Right Hand

What happened to good, old fashioned, “please” and “thank you”? As a customer, it’s nice to be thanked for my business, or appreciated for my subscription to a service. It makes me feel part of the brand and valued for my investment. But as a cold prospect, it’s even more important since making a good impression should always be part of the process. So why is it missing from so many marketing communications programs?

What happened to good, old fashioned, “please” and “thank you”?

As a customer, it’s nice to be thanked for my business, or appreciated for my subscription to a service. It makes me feel part of the brand and valued for my investment. But as a cold prospect, it’s even more important since making a good impression should always be part of the process. So why is it missing from so many marketing communications programs?

After attending a B-to-B webinar recently, I fully expected to receive a follow-up email thanking me for my attendance, and a continued nurturing of me along their sales cycle: A request for a meeting, an invitation to participate in a live demo, or even a link to a case study or two that were geared to my industry. Instead, I got an email that sounded as if they were talking to a cold prospect.

Perhaps the marketing manager failed to merge/purge the webinar registration/attendee list against their cold prospecting list (tsk, tsk, tsk). But I suspect this business didn’t even think to conduct a merge/purge. Why?

Because, like most mid-to-large B-to-B organizations, one marketing manager is responsible for acquisition and someone else is responsible for sales support—and it seems that neither of them talk to each other … EVER.

If this company maintains a database, I should be flagged as “responded” AND “attended an event” so the sales team can take over the management of this “lead.” I’ve met with many, many organizations that don’t have a lead database (or, even worse, they have multiple databases because no one is happy with the company solution, or the solution is too hard to manage/maintain). Worse still, they may have a customer database, but it’s not well maintained, or is too difficult to access/use. So when it comes time to upsell or cross-sell a product, they don’t even know who their customers are, or how to talk to them in a meaningful way.

Thus we circle back to my dilemma. How can you thank me for attending an event and start to sell me on your product/solution, if you don’t know that I attended in the first place?

As marketers, we’re all busy with our heads down, trying to get work out the door. I get it. But at some point, you have to stop all the day-to-day madness and realize that you’re just putting off the inevitable. Insist on investing in a proper marketing database and a database manager to help your company communicate with more intelligence and insight. In turn, that will lead to your ability to target any particular audience and craft smarter, more relevant marketing messages, which will, in turn, lead to better results. I guarantee it.

Oh, and you’re welcome.