10 Self-Marketing Tips for Job-Seeking Marketing Grads

I’ve been informally coaching my undergrad business school students on how to prepare for the business world they’ll face while job-seeking in just 1.5 years. They have some work experience, usually as interns. When it comes to presenting themselves in a business context, they are pretty green.

I’ve been informally coaching my undergrad business school students on how to prepare for the business world they’ll face while job-seeking in just 1.5 years. They have some work experience, usually as interns. When it comes to presenting themselves in a business context, they are pretty green.

But they’re eager and ambitious, so I decided to compile a set of tips to help them get ready.

I’d appreciate comments and additions from colleagues on these:

  1. Find a Local Professional Association in your area of interest — whether industry or job function. Join as a student member, and volunteer to help with a committee.
  2. Use All 120 Characters Available for Your LinkedIn Headline, and pack it with keywords about your skills. Finance, analytics, big data, strategy — use the terms hiring managers are looking for.
  3. Write Your LinkedIn Bio With Your Goal in Mind. Who are you trying to persuade? If it’s to attract job offers, then emphasize your skills, attitude and drive. Talk about contributions you made during internships. Declare your ideal industry and job function.
  4. Use a Professional Photo. Seems obvious, but surprisingly many LinkedIn members use shots more suited to Facebook.
  5. Clean Up Your Social Media. Take down photos and delete comments from your younger days that may make you look undesirable as an employee.
  6. Practice Your Elevator Speech. Come up with a few sentences that identify your situation and your goals. Add in a personal or professional twist to stimulate interest. Once you have it down, then start practicing ways to adjust your speech on the fly, depending on the audience.
  7. Buy Your Name as a Domain, and use it for your professional email address.
  8. Start Building Your Professional Network. Begin with your classmates, teachers and guest speakers. Add people you meet at your internships. Send out LinkedIn invitations, and also maintain a database of contacts. Keep in touch.
  9. If You’re Not a Natural Joiner, then find other ways to position yourself. Try writing a guest blog post. Follow writers on business subjects of interest to you, and actively comment on their posts.
  10. Think Ahead. You are in college now, but in the business world before you know it. Take steps early, and often, to position yourself for a satisfying career.

A version of this article appeared in Biznology, the digital marketing blog.

2 Words to Get You Through 2017

Last week during our annual holiday party, our president Dave Leskusky gave a thoughtful speech, sharing that he wanted to spend more time in 2017 saying “thank you.” He thanked us for our hard work, the effort we make to accept new challenges and the strides we take to keep running at the pace he asks of us. At the time, it seemed like an apropos holiday party speech. Nice. Not too long. Just the right amount of jokes added in the right spots. But then I thought a little more about it.

Last week during our annual holiday party, our president Dave Leskusky gave a thoughtful speech, sharing that he wanted to spend more time in 2017 saying “thank you.” Thanking us for our hard work, the effort we make to accept new challenges and the strides we take to keep running at the pace he asks of us.

He thanked the room of people surrounding him, some of us receiving shout-outs for specific projects, and at the time it seemed like an apropos holiday party speech. Nice. Not too long. Just the right amount of jokes added in the right spots.

Thank You Fallon gifBut I’ve thought about it off and on for the past week, and while “thank you” might seem like two simple words, when said with genuine gratitude, it’s much more.

It reminds us that we’re seen, that we matter and that we have an effect on others. That’s pretty powerful.

So, for my final post of 2016, I have this to say: Thank you.

Thank you for clicking on my headlines in the e-newsletter, on the website, on social media sites, or if you’re one of my close friends, for clicking on the links I text you when I’m especially excited about a piece I write or a video I shoot.

Thank you for reading and watching. Thank you for taking the time to comment publicly on our site, or to reach out to me privately. We all lead busy lives (by the way, “busy” is the the four-letter word I ban from most of our editorial meetings, because, duh, we all are), so when you take the time to reach out to me, I realize you could have spent that time doing something else, possibly much more important.

Thank you standing with me when you agree with one of my points, and thank you for — respectfully — challenging me when you disagree. Trust me, I learn something every time you do.

As we head into 2017, let’s all take more time to thank those around us. Our friends and families, our colleagues, our customers. And mean it when you say “thank you,” otherwise you’re just meaninglessly uttering two words that can have a lot of power when used for good (all right, now I’m stepping into cheesy territory … time to doggie paddle out).

And if you didn’t see the video we shared yesterday, celebrating our team’s accomplishments in 2016, check it out below!

We had a lot of fun this year, and we couldn’t have done it without you … thank you! Happy Holidays, and I’ll see you in 2017!