Is College Outdated? Should It Teach Real-World Marketing Skills?

On one hand, many universities could be doing a better job giving students opportunities to practice real-world marketing skills. On the other, universities are not meant to be training departments for digital media agencies, and it’s unrealistic to expect faculty members who don’t work in the field to keep up with the rapidly changing dynamic of media planning and buying.

Shay Rowbottom of Margle Media posted a video rant on LinkedIn a few weeks ago about a recent college grad she interviewed who had no digital media buying experience. She blames colleges and universities for not keeping up with the times. Knowing that I do a lot of teaching at the college level, Paul Bobnak tagged me asking what I thought. I think it’s complicated.

On one hand, many universities could be doing a better job giving students opportunities to practice real-world marketing skills. On the other, universities are not meant to be training departments for digital media agencies, and it’s unrealistic to expect faculty members who don’t work in the field to keep up with the rapidly changing dynamic of media planning and buying.

Despite being an advertising and marketing major at a large university, the only media buying experience Shay’s job candidate had was in traditional media, specifically billboards and newspaper. She condemns higher education for not keeping pace with the current state of media buying (and shows her ageism fangs in the process):

“You know what, kid, if you land a job at an old company that’s ran (sic) by 60 year olds who still don’t want to transition any of their media dollars to social media then good, good, good. I’m glad you learned the billboards.”

Shay says that something is wrong if a newly hired college grad has to be trained by her agency’s digital media buyer, a college dropout who’s a highly skilled practitioner, self-taught on the Internet. To that I say, “Who better to learn from than someone who does it every day and is really good at it?”

Shay makes a valid point that too many institutions are behind the curve when it comes to integrating real-world skills into their curriculum. But her expectations are valid only if you believe that colleges and universities exist to provide job training. I’ve worked at Rowan, Rutgers and Temple universities. They each hire industry professionals for full- and part-time teaching positions in advertising and PR. But the full-time faculty members at these institutions don’t do media planning every day, so they can’t possibly keep up with the innovations in a rapidly changing field.

Learning the mechanics of media buying is a vocational skill. Universities are not designed to be vocational schools. The ones where I’ve taught deliver a solid grounding in the principles of marketing and advertising; that’s what they do best. They provide value, because most of the underlying principles of marketing and advertising remain stable — even as the dynamics of the media world shift. Media planning and placement are best taught by practitioners who stay current by doing it.

Fortunately, there are several programs where college students can gain real-world experience in a competitive environment; specifically the Collegiate ECHO Marketing Challenge run by Marketing EDGE, the National Student Advertising Competition from the American Advertising Federation and the Google Online Marketing Challenge. These competitions are underutilized by academic institutions and employers, alike. More colleges and universities should offer and support these programs, more students should participate and more employers should seek out graduates who have had these experiences.

Jobs for Everyone — Riding the Data Train to Washington

Positions in digital media and data analysis abound, and we’re still not training them fast enough to meet the demand — domestically. That means support for all aspects of data curricula at colleges and universities, and perhaps secondary education too, as well as retraining programs for displaced workers — something that did not receive nearly enough attention in the general election.

President-elect Donald J. Trump didn’t take long to take credit for an arrangement to keep a Carrier Corporation plant in the U.S. — even if there was some question over just how many jobs were in the balance.

Hanging onto good-paying manufacturing jobs certainly is a well-intended public policy goal, as long as we understand the incurred corporate welfare cost that was just shifted to the taxpayer. Still, a saved private-sector job is better than a lost private-sector job. However, it’s only a bridge or a bandage.

There are plenty of jobs — well paid and in America — that are dear to fill. Perhaps public policy, public and private education, research and development, and maybe even some philanthropy might do a better job preparing (all of) America for the 21st Century. We love STEM majors, but also critical thinking from liberal arts that give strategy to data analysis. AdTech and advertising are booming — we all need better and faster algorithms to help sell things efficiently, and data-informed creative skills to create more engaging and relevant content.

Let’s face it. America needs to re-orient itself for the “Data Train.”marketing dataPositions in digital media and data analysis abound, and we’re still not training them fast enough to meet the demand — domestically. That means support for all aspects of data curricula at colleges and universities, and perhaps secondary education too, as well as retraining programs for displaced workers — something that did not receive nearly enough attention in the general election.

Let the private sector do its work and let innovation grow the marketplace for jobs. Perhaps government can best help by researching and reporting what skills and training are desperately needed. This is not a call for central government planning, but if we can fund corporate incentives to “stay home,” we can certainly fund training and retraining programs for an Information Economy, based on the commercial availability and responsible use of data, that is providing financial well-being for millions of households, with millions more to come.

Hey, I’m all for “shovel-ready” jobs to rebuild American infrastructure — that well could be a bipartisan love affair that helps bolster global standing for “U.S. Open for Business.” But, also, in that same refrain, let’s demand a “jobs” plan that puts an emphasis on education and retraining for the Information Economy. The U.S. leads in this category — are we going to squander it?

Happy Holidays, and as you make your end-of-year giving, please consider our own livelihoods and future talent development in our field. Consider sponsoring a student and donate to Marketing EDGE. Philanthropy, yes, and an investment in a data-driven marketing career, one student at a time.

6 Tips for College Admissions Direct Mail

It’s been a while since I looked at college mail as a student, but I guess some things never change. Here’s a look at engaging college direct mail.

It’s been a while since I looked at college mail as a student, but I guess some things never change.

A few of my relatives and friends’ kids are considering the next steps in their educations. And, as it often happens, I’ve offered my advice based on the mail they’ve been getting.

Some of it is disappointing.

There are some schools that use basic direct mail to push prospective students to their websites as soon as possible. I’m talking about a 1-page letter, a quick call-to-action, and that’s it … no pictures, no graphics, no inspiring copy. Only a logo on the envelope.

Not very welcoming, is it? And pretty much what most colleges were mailing in 1984.

But there are some colleges that use the possibilities presented by printed direct mail to reach out to high schoolers in engaging ways. Here are a few I found in the files of Who’s Mailing What!

1. Be Inspiring
collegebrynminspire_01
Bryn Mawr College mailed a 6”x11” postcard showing four young women passing through an arch on campus. After boasting about some of the careers achieved by its graduates, it asks: “Who will you become?” The opposite side talks about how the student will be part of a “thoughtful and challenging community of peers.” Both sides use a PURL call to action.

2. Show Your Data
neumont_01Here’s a great example from Neumont University, which has mailed this infographic in a #10 outer for over three years. It’s maybe the best I’ve ever seen in a direct mail package. It has word clouds, graphs, logos, and all of the important stats on how well the college prepares students for exciting tech careers. The entire package is about displaying the benefits.

3. Offer An Incentive
collegeubfree_01A lot of college students change direction, or otherwise face challenges that cause them to miss graduating in four years. The University of Baltimore dangles a carrot to students to finish on time: their last semester is free. It’s a simple postcard that doesn’t require any fancy graphics to make its point.

4. Use An involvement Device
collegekendallflash_01Early childhood education is an important program at Chicago’s Kendall College. So it mailed a small set of flashcards, the very tools a teacher would use, to spark some thought about how studying there helps a student advance their career in different ways.

5. Leverage Your Alumni
collegealbrightcool_01Colleges and universities may want to showcase their famous graduates, like athletes or entertainers, as a way to attract prospects. But another good option is showing how its alumni can wind up in other interesting places. Here, an Albright College graduate was chosen to meet with President Obama to talk about education policy. “You’re prepared for anything,” the postcard says.

6. Try Long Copy
collegerowanguide_01Rowan University mailed a “Guide for Parents & Families” that foregoes charts and hype. Instead, over 8 pages with long paragraphs, it gets the parent to “focus on the long term” in helping the student make a choice. It also lays out the exact costs for attending, as well as typical financial aid packages offered.

Here’s a final thought: I’ve always liked mail that includes pictures of students instead of buildings. Students enjoying the college experience …talking and learning in classrooms … playing sports … dancing … walking with friends. Anything that reminds students and parents that college is about more than the destination. College is about a journey of self-discovery. And, it’s one that’s also shared with others on journeys of their own.

Marketers, these are just a few of the tactics that can engage students and parents. What college mail do you like, or dislike? Please share in the comments below.

Retention Starts With Onboarding

Many purchase decisions come with months of angst, review of competitive options, and discussion among peers, family and friends, or in the case of a business purchase, stakeholders and management. Some are impulse buys, given no more thought than a click of a button. But when you finally do pull the trigger, what does that brand do to try and retain you as a customer other than immediately start to upsell you to another product or service?

Customer retentionMany purchase decisions come with months of angst, review of competitive options, and discussion among peers, family and friends, or in the case of a business purchase, stakeholders and management. Some are impulse buys, given no more thought than a click of a button. But when you finally do pull the trigger, what does that brand do to try and retain you as a customer other than immediately start to upsell you to another product or service?

In a blog posted nearly a year ago, I wrote about my personal experience making a college “purchase” decision for each of my twin boys. It’s certainly a brand decision that is worth, in some instances, over $100,000 to the institution selected, so you’d think (no, expect) them to understand and optimize the relationship from day one. For one college, they did exactly that … but for the other, not so much.

For many marketers, the focus is entirely on the front-end of the sales process. And while those efforts are critically important to fill the pipeline, it’s equally important to make sure your new customer is aware of all the resources available post-purchase including training videos, user groups, access to tools and add-ons, and other ways to optimize their brand experience.

Too often, the first contact post-purchase is an email that tries to sell you more goods/services, and that can be a complete turn-off.

In a pilot campaign for AAA of Northern California, Nevada and Utah, new AAA members were asked to complete a short online survey so follow-up emails would be more relevant to their lifestage. Those with teenagers, for example, were probably most concerned with new driver safety, while empty nesters wanted to know how to use their AAA card to access better travel deals. The result was a huge lift in open and click through rates — and, by continuously communicating the value of membership, an increase in retention rates.

After B-to-B targets sign up for a free demo at LifeSize, they are sent a series of emails that help them get set up, add users, set up a video chat, set up a group chat, etc. Experiencing the product with all the bells and whistles helps ensure a maximum product experience, increasing conversion rates. But they don’t stop there — post-purchase emails continue to give tips and tricks on how to use the product to its fullest.

Now let’s go back to my college experience. One of my twins decided to change colleges this fall, after completing his freshman year. After he was accepted at his new school and had accepted the offer for a dorm room, he received several “retention” emails: an introduction from the student who “heads” the dorms, inviting him to drop by for coffee; an introduction from an upperclassman that will be acting as his mentor (“Ask me anything about campus life!”); an invitation to sign up for an orientation session that involves rafting down a local river; an announcement that the campus food service just won a Silver Award … for the Best Food on a College Campus! Do you think he’s looking forward to attending this school for a few years? Sign us all up!

But the best message of all came from the Admissions Office. Without us even asking, they went ahead and researched his freshman year course work at his previous college and advised him that they had transferred/accepted specific course credits, so he has all of his electives now completed for two years. That’s what I call customer service.

In my experience, only a handful of brands do anything post-sale other than promote sale items or send a little chest-beating message. In many industries, newsletters are considered passé, and considering how much content we know consumers want, I’m surprised more brands don’t understand how to leverage it to keep customers engaged until the next membership renewal and/or selling opportunity.

I’d love to hear some other best practices so we can all learn from these marketing leaders.

What I Learned at College: A Business Lesson in Revenue Maximization

Now, after attending three different colleges, I’m impressed with some of the strategies colleges are deploying to make sure they’ve got your kid (and you!) hooked for a four to six year relationship. Some of these institutions have mastered both acquisition and retention efforts and I wouldn’t be surprised if they could teach a course on the subject.

This fall, my twin sons are headed to college. Make no mistake — this is not my first trip to that rodeo. Our older son started his journey six years earlier.

While my husband handled all the college tours, Mom was the designated supporter for completing college applications and, upon acceptance, attending the orientation sessions. Now, after attending three different colleges, I’m impressed with some of the strategies colleges are deploying to make sure they’ve got your kid (and you!) hooked for a four to six year relationship. Some of these institutions have mastered both acquisition and retention efforts and I wouldn’t be surprised if they could teach a course on the subject.

Considering only 55 percent of undergraduates finished their degree within six years, and the average four-year college cost is between $23,410 and $46,272, there are hundreds of thousands of dollars at risk. So, like any good business, colleges have started figure out that there needs to be some really smart marketing strategies at play if they’re going to maximize their student investment, and it involves both the student and a key group of influencers — their parents.

One state college orientation was by and far the most memorable of the three, as I left their event feeling like I was the one going to college (clearly, they had me hooked). So take a few tips and apply them to your own marketing efforts.

  • Relationship Nurturing 101: The Welcome Letter
    You’d think we’d voluntarily joined a membership club with the surprise and delight that exudes from the acceptance letter. “Congratulations,” it chirps, “and welcome to the Class of 2019!” already planting the seed that we’re in it for the next four years. The letter goes on to remind you of all the fabulous things you’ll be encountering on your journey and keeps reiterating that we’ve made a fabulous choice. (Remember, my son hadn’t yet “accepted” their offer, so the sales pitch needed to be a powerful reminder of all the reasons he applied in the first place.) The “handwritten” notation by the Dean of his school of study, casually jotted at the bottom of the letter, added to the personal experience and feeling that they really, really wanted my son to attend.
  • Reaffirming the Purchase Decision: The Acceptance Confirmation Letter
    Once my son had confirmed his attendance, the next communication came via email — and you’d think he had won the lottery. It was lighthearted in tone, oozing with details about what he’ll experience in his campus life, and setting the stage for the mandatory orientation. But instead of feeling like a punishment, it was sold as an exciting way to meet new friends, learn to navigate the campus before classes actually start, and discover “insider’s” tips on how to make the most of your next four years.
  • Onboarding: The Orientation
    A two-day effort, this event was carefully calculated as a way to weed apart the parent/child relationship and start the separate, but equally important, sales pitch(es). Parents registered at a separate table, while students were redirected to a location beyond my line of sight. Parents were directed to a large room where a combination of student leaders and selected faculty sat on the stage. Each one was enthusiastic, knowledgeable and truly made me feel welcome. After brief opening remarks, they asked, through a show of hands, which states families were from – and then encouraged us to introduce ourselves to the people seated around us. Of course that sparked immediate conversation, helped everyone to relax and start to feel an intimate part of a special community. To keep your attention, they broke parents into different groups and moved us into different and smaller rooms for more Q&A-style sessions so that by lunch time, you weren’t worried about finding a buddy to share a lunch table. At cocktail hour, they walked us over to their new state-of-the-art music center where a group of students performed followed by a casual wine and cheese event. The faculty moved easily from table to table distributing a brochure featuring their fall line-up of musicians and it definitely made me want to return regularly to see other performers (yes, I was shifting from “like” to “evangelism” rather rapidly at this point, but they could also see the ROI in that cross-sell effort).It seems my son was getting the same welcoming treatment, only from a different angle. Lots of pretty girls and attractive boys created an upbeat environment. Broken into smaller groups, he was immersed into campus life. They played games, met professors, learned about course options, selected his fall semester classes, played ultimate Frisbee, participated in a water fight, and stayed up late watching horror flicks on the grassy knoll before retiring to his temporary dorm quarters exhausted.
  • Sealing the Deal: The Closing Rally
    At the end of a second day that involved a tour of the athletic center (Olympic-sized pool, five gyms, squash courts, workout rooms, yoga studio – heck, sign me up!), library (where all the cool kids study), and lake-side luncheon (can you say BBQ?), we were ushered into another venue for the closing ceremonies, and that’s the first time I laid eyes on my son since the morning we arrived. He was sitting with his newfound friends wearing a team t-shirt with a big grin on his face. Within minutes of being seated, group by group stood up and shouted their newly created team cheers, razzed other groups, and generally laughed their way to the final gong. Music filled the air as we danced our way out of the venue and made our way back to our cars for the trip home, barely containing our excitement about the start of his new life away from home.
  • Performance Improvement: The Survey
    About 2 days after we returned, we were both sent an online survey about our onboarding experience. Needless to say it got very high marks from this mother and son.

All-in-all, it was one of the best experiences I’ve ever had with any college ever. Everyone was welcoming, friendly, helpful and truly invested in ensuring both me and my son were excited about what the future would hold for both of us. My other two college orientation experiences lacked the genuine enthusiasm, excitement and innovativeness of experience and felt more like their role was to make sure that I realized I needed to let go — but not before understanding that I would not have access to grades unless granted permission by my child.

Many colleges could take a lesson from this state school because I’m sure their retention rate thru graduation is better than the norm. They figured out that it isn’t just the student who needs to fall in love with the school, but the parent, too. After all, my son won’t be writing those tuition checks all by himself.

Mentoring: Give a Little, Get a Lot

Last summer, I heard that my alma mater was launching a mentoring program between graduates and enrolled Seniors. Even though I no longer reside in my college town, I quickly volunteered to be a guinea pig for remote mentoring

Last summer, I heard that my alma mater was launching a mentoring program between graduates and enrolled Seniors. Even though I no longer reside in my college town, I quickly volunteered to be a guinea pig for remote mentoring.

The woman running the program was hesitant at first—her vision was to put grads and students together face-to-face and create events that would bring the mentor/mentees together outside of 1:1 meetings.

Even though I reside in the San Francisco Bay Area and my college is in chilly Ottawa, Canada, I convinced her to team me with a student who was studying abroad for a semester so neither of us would be on campus.

Luckily I was paired with a wonderful senior named Mitch who was spending a semester in The Netherlands and studying marketing. We hit it off immediately, swapping stories about our pasts, our work experiences and talking about his goals when he graduates (to work in sports marketing). Mitch proved to be intelligent, inquisitive and eager to learn about the real world of marketing and advertising.

In our weekly calls, I answered a lot of questions (about marketing strategies and tactics and concerning specific job functions in the industry), but we also talked about some very practical things like how to put together a solid resume and a LinkedIn profile. Frankly, I was a bit surprised that in this social media crazed world, this very bright student was not that familiar with LinkedIn and how to use it to his advantage. Upon having further conversations with my college graduate son and his friends, it seems none of them were particularly savvy about LinkedIn and how leverage it to their advantage.

Helping Mitch with his resume was a fascinating exercise in marketing. His first draft provided a laundry list of all his summer jobs, but didn’t successfully position his experience and his growing expertise. As I quizzed him on what he actually did at each job, I helped him extract the salient messages he needed to convey about his skills and accomplishments—it was similar to working with a client to help them clarify and synthesize a product’s attributes and benefits, and how they stacked up to the competition.

For example, during his Junior year, Mitch worked for a marketing agency that was helping Microsoft increase its mindshare among college students. He described that job as “Independently reach and educate University students regarding the benefits of Microsoft products while entrusted with expensive technology.”

After some probing into what he was REALLY doing and the knowledge and skill set it required, we rewrote it to read “Manned an on-campus booth and answered questions about various Microsoft software products while retaining proficiency in Microsoft Windows 8.1 and the Microsoft Office Suite of products. Using Microsoft-provided software / hardware, performed a Pre- and Post- Attitudinal Behavior Study.”

Now he sounded impressive!

What was most exciting, however, is that this week Mitch advised me that a Netherlands-based sports organization that he follows on Twitter had tweeted about an opening for a marketing assistant. We quickly got to work refining his resume to match all the skills the job description required and crafted an introduction letter that further highlighted his skills.

We also did a LinkedIn search to determine who the position would report to and poured over the hiring managers resume. I encouraged Mitch to spend time on the company’s website, social media sites to become immersed in the brand, its mission, brand positioning, communications messages and key issues the company is facing.

Yesterday Mitch was contacted by the hiring manager and asked for work samples and to set up an interview. We then went to work prepping him with questions he might ask during the interview process. Honestly, I was as excited as Mitch was!

As I finish this column, I’m waiting to hear the outcome of that first important job interview, but either way, I’m confident that this young man will be a marketing rock star and any firm would be lucky to employ him. And, I relish the opportunity to help another grad enter the world of marketing fully knowledgeable with the skill set to market themselves successfully.

At Your Service! Really!

I had to meet a friend unexpectedly at the hospital the other day. As you would expect, my mind was racing with all sorts of “what ifs.” I was wondering where to park when I pulled into the main entrance, and several kind people positioned at the door offered to valet my car and escort me to where I needed to go. This level of service reminiscent of a fine hotel, not a hospital, pleasantly surprised me. Genuine helpfulness and sincere caring. (And, thankfully, all turned out well for my friend.)

I had to meet a friend unexpectedly at the hospital the other day. As you would expect, my mind was racing with all sorts of “what ifs.” I was wondering where to park when I pulled into the main entrance, and several kind people positioned at the door offered to valet my car and escort me to where I needed to go. This level of service reminiscent of a fine hotel, not a hospital, pleasantly surprised me. Genuine helpfulness and sincere caring. (And, thankfully, all turned out well for my friend.)

As a brand strategist and a customer of many brands, I am in tune to the many ways companies tout their customer service. If your experiences are akin to mine, actual meaningful and truly excellent service still seems to be a rarity. Customer service gets lots of talk time (the one true brand differentiator!) these days, but is it time to double check and see if your brand is paying more than lip service to this important customer-centric activity?

Do you know if your service level is actually accomplishing what matters most to your customers? Would customers consider it a concierge experience? Take a peek at these examples and see how a few companies pay more than lip service to this important function:

Focus: Target Audience
Bed Bath & Beyond knows that the back-to-school season is almost akin to Christmas-in-August for its brand. With thousands of new freshmen heading to campuses nationwide in need of all things dorm related, Bed Bath & Beyond has truly gone beyond in creating an amazingly useful college-prepping brand experience. The website is chockfull of helpful advice about pertinent things top-of-mind for new college students. Take a peek at the topics covered in their online College Checklist:

  • Storing Your Stuff
  • Making Your Bed Better
  • Climate Control
  • An Inspiring Work Area
  • Resolving Technical Difficulties
  • Keeping Your Room Clean
  • Doing Laundry
  • Surviving a Shared Bathroom

After perusing both a printed checklist, a succinct magalog and an online version, students can enter their colleges in the company’s website and see if there are convenient Bed Bath & Beyond locations near their dorms so they don’t have to haul all this new merchandise from home. This concierge-esque brand takes it even a step further and has prepared lists of what the specific colleges and universities have already provided, what they want students to bring and what is not allowed. There’s even a college registry available, all set for family members who may want to gift the new freshmen upon high school graduation with these dorm life must haves.

And, once those students are settled in and living their particular collegiate lives, Bed Bath & Beyond continues to develop its student relationships with a “Grade My Space” program described as follows:

Grade My Space is a new interactive site where you’ll get an inside look at college living spaces and residence halls. Students connect and share ideas, designs, comments and provide the inside scoop on campus living and more.

How might your brand borrow brilliantly from Bed Bath & Beyond and put this usefulness in action for one of your specific customer segments?

Focus: Product Category
Target’s “guest-centric” brand attitude has always hit the bull’s eye, but the company is building on this experience in one particular category in a more nuanced way across 300 of its stores—Beauty. According to a recent press release:

Participating stores are staffed with a Target Beauty Concierge, a highly-trained, brand agnostic beauty enthusiast who is available to answer guests’ questions in-store. Serving as a trusted expert, the Beauty Concierge provides guests with personalized, detailed and unbiased information about beauty and personal care products offered at Target and acts as a knowledgeable source of advice in what can sometimes be an intimidating department. Beauty Concierges are located in the beauty aisles at Target wearing a distinct black apron. No appointment is necessary.

In addition to Target doing this with beauty, Lands End has done this with swimwear … a troublesome category for many women. Might there be a department or category within your brand that customers would welcome some one-on-one consultation? How might you enhance your service level in a key product category to generate not only more sales, but a more customer-centric experience?

Company-Wide Focus
Nordstrom has long wowed its customers with service that goes the extra mile. Today, its website reminds customers that unlike some other department stores, working with Nordstrom personal stylists is “fast, fun, free and zero pressure!” They’ll even prep your dressing room for you in advance of your visit.

“We’ll be there the whole time to offer new suggestions and honest advice—even if you are only looking to research, not to buy.” My girlfriend utilized this service in helping outfit her son, a new college graduate preparing for an international job opportunity. Not only was the time saved important, but now this stylist has all his measurements and style/color preferences recorded to make future shopping needs a breeze.

Office supply multichanneler, Staples, also is promising a company-wide concierge experience to back up its brand promise of “EASY”! Under its “Need Help?” tab is a listing for Product Concierge. Here’s what Staples says:

Can’t find what you’re looking for? We’re here to help! If you need help tracking down an item, we’ll search for it for you-even if it’s something we don’t currently have on our site. Tell us a bit more about the product and we’ll do our best to find it. There’s no obligation to buy.

Might your brand be able to promote this kind of across-the-board expectation? If not, what might have to change to do so?

Truly serving your customers concierge-style takes a full commitment from each and every brand ambassador within your company. It requires active listening and keen observation. It requires a servant heart and a willingness to sweat the small stuff to provide an excellent and memorable experience that will not only delight your customers once but keep them coming back for more … and raving about your brand to others.