Should USPS Retrofit Facilities for E-commerce Fulfillment?

Three trends make me wonder if there’s money to be found in U.S. Postal Service real estate. First, the Postal Service continues to bleed, despite higher revenue—no thanks to Congress for its inability to pass meaningful, fixable reforms. Second, network consolidation continues apace—with 141 facilities consolidated to date in the Postal Service’s plan for Network Rationalization—and another 82 slated for 2015

Three trends make me wonder if there’s money to be found in U.S. Postal Service real estate.

First, the Postal Service continues to bleed, despite higher revenue—no thanks to Congress for its inability to pass meaningful, fixable reforms.

Second, network consolidation continues apace—with 141 facilities consolidated to date in the Postal Service’s plan for Network Rationalization—and another 82 slated for 2015

Third, commercial real estate is booming—in the market for e-commerce warehouses—as online shopping now accounts for 6.2 percent of U.S. total sales. Industrial space is growing at an annual rate of 14.5 million square meters per year, while retail is rising at just 6 million square meters.

Is there an opportunity for some matchmaking here? The Postal Service does have a lot of commercial property for sale—43 buildings as of today’s writing—but what if some property could be reconfigured for e-commerce fulfillment? As the USPS expands its parcels business, it may make sense to reassess USPS assets—particularly as facilities are made vacant—and to determine some opportunities for expanding its parcel business, assessing suitability for e-commerce—including leasing to private firms—and taking advantage of USPS’s huge inventory and infrastructure advantages—particularly in and near population centers.

Same-day fulfillment is really a sparkler being tested and implemented in several cities. Tomorrow, it’s bound to be a fulfillment staple.

A Successful Social Selling Example in B-to-B Marketing

Jones Lang LaSalle (JLL) is one of my favorite social selling examples in B-to-B sales. Telling this story at conferences is always a crowd-pleaser because of how practical and repeatable the approach is. JLL is a global player in real estate management and investments. The firm helps commercial real estate owners make money managing big properties and buildings smarter. In this short video, I’ll reveal how JLL’s sales team is using YouTube videos to get more discussion going with hard-to-reach decision-makers.

Jones Lang LaSalle (JLL) is one of my favorite social selling examples in B-to-B sales. Telling this story at conferences is always a crowd-pleaser because of how practical and repeatable the approach is.

JLL is a global player in real estate management and investments. The firm helps commercial real estate owners make money managing big properties and buildings smarter. In this short video, I’ll reveal how JLL’s sales team is using YouTube videos to get more discussion going with hard-to-reach decision-makers.

Behind the Scenes
What’s at work here? Let’s look at what’s going on behind the scenes so you can replicate social selling success in your setting.

JLL’s sales team has an unusually smart, very effective, starting point when approaching social selling.

They start with customers’ problems, challenges and goals in mind. Then, they design everything they put out onto social media to create one thing: response. For them that’s all that matters—getting clients to email or pick up the phone and ask for a meeting to talk about their problems.

JLL’s sales and account reps know how to structure what to say. They know how to talk to clients, not just what to say. They also know when to talk and when to clam up. This helps them create so much curiosity in JLL that customers cannot resist responding.

JLL’s reps provoke customers to take action. Here’s the surprising part: In the world of social media, what actually generates response has very little to do with technology.

Generating leads and appointments is based on one, essential practice: Copywriting. Direct response copywriting that grabs attention, challenges status quo thinking and provokes a response. So here’s one of my best social selling examples: A multi-billion dollar organization using the copywriting technique I love to train sales teams to execute.

The Problem and Solution
JLL had a new energy & sustainability division to launch, but current customers told sales reps their whitepapers were horrible. Potential customers were distracted—impossible to reach. The “greening of corporate America” was in full swing, but customers didn’t want to engage.

The problem: JLL’s whitepapers were filled with knowledge that clients already. So JLL’s sellers decided to focus more on capturing video sound bytes from a variety of property management experts.

Each two- to three-minute video captured surprising and, sometimes, shocking information. Knowledge that was structured to intentionally irritate customers—cause them to think, “Uh-oh, I didn’t realize that. I’d better call my rep to get to the bottom of this,” or “WHAT?! I had no idea. I better find out more about this right away … my butt is on the line here!”

For the rest of the story, watch the video clip above and learn how got the attention of busy, distracted property owners—many of whom were interested in talking about JLL’s services after all! I’ll show you exactly how they got prospects and clients to ask for discussions!

Generate Leads With Social Media by Provoking Thought, Not Leading It

Why is it so difficult to generate sales leads using social media? Probably because we’re all busy creating “quality content” (whatever that is!) rather than designing content to generate leads. At the risk of my wife divorcing me, I decided to take a year off and find out how businesses who actually are quietly succeeding with social media are doing it. A year’s worth of research confirmed my suspicions about the so-called “social media revolution” and revealed an exciting opportunity: A chance for more B-to-B and B-to-C marketers to generate tangible business leads and sales using tools like LinkedIn, Facebook, blogs and video.

Why is it so difficult to generate sales leads using social media? Probably because we’re all busy creating “quality content” (whatever that is!) rather than designing content to generate leads. At the risk of my wife divorcing me, I decided to take a year off and find out how businesses who actually are quietly succeeding with social media are doing it. A year’s worth of research confirmed my suspicions about the so-called “social media revolution” and revealed an exciting opportunity: A chance for more B-to-B and B-to-C marketers to generate tangible business leads and sales using tools like LinkedIn, Facebook, blogs and video.

The secret is now revealed: Selling with social media requires shifting the paradigm away from being thought leaders and toward being thought provokers.

These Brands Are Making Social Media Sell
My research revealed how people like Laura Messerschmitt of Intuit are convincing more and more customers to sign up for the Online Payroll product. I learned how investment and property management firm, Jones Lang LaSalle is generating tangible leads on seven-figure commercial real estate deals using YouTube. I discovered how Wisconsin’s AnchorBank and the Queensland Teachers’ Credit Union are increasing share of customers’ wallet and acquiring new customers at record pace.

This Is How They’re Doing it
What’s their secret? Turning friends, followers and content into sales, leads and subscribers means solving customers’ problems in ways that nurtures demand for larger solutions. These companies are helping customers gain clarity on complex problems and then leveraging that clarity. How? By answering questions in ways that make it increasingly rewarding for customers to take action, identify themselves as a lead.

Selling with social media demands brands become thought provokers, not just thought leaders.

Design to Sell, Become Addictive
Successful social sellers know: Engagement is not an outcome. It’s an opportunity to create response. But not by chance. Engagement must invite customers’ questions and respond to it in a deliberate way, as part of a social media-driven direct response marketing plan. This design gathers up customers’ itches (problems), scratches them (gives answers) in yet in incomplete ways. Holding back on providing the full solution is key.

The formula is incredibly close to the illegal narcotics trade. You give customers’ a sample providing momentary satisfaction, but not enough for the desire to be completely sated. In other words, here… have a little bit. You will feel something that you’ll enjoy but it won’t be enough, you’ll want to have more of it. In order to have more you’re going to have to talk to me—and you may even find yourself wanting to buy some from me!

Today’s true thought leaders are thought provokers. They are putting interesting, valuable, addictive thoughts “out there” in ways that prompt customers to ask for more, more often.

Take Action
Make social media sell. Ask yourself: are you giving customers a reason to talk to you on LinkedIn? Are your blogs so bold they provoke action? Does your content marketing strategy show customers ways to avoid risks they don’t yet know they have? Do your YouTube videos or white papers reveal hidden opportunity? Are your campaigns designed so that customers will contact you—so they your team can help them more clearly understand what you just provoked?