The 2 Biggest Problems With Your Sales Communication

There are two of huge problems with sales communication techniques — they make you look weak, and like every other seller out there.

If you’ve ever written or spoken the words, “I just wanted to …” stop. If you’ve ever sent emails to clients pushing on pain points, stop that, too (because that’s exactly what your competition is doing).

These are two of the biggest problems with sales communication techniques — they make you look weak, and like every other seller out there.

Here’s how to understand if your mentality and pain-point-pushing are, in fact, causing you to start fewer conversations than you deserve. If so, we’ll get you on track with stronger written and voice-based digital messages.

Stop ‘Wanting To’

Subconsciously you may be on the defensive. We all are. In life and with our work. Defensiveness and uncertainty are part of the human experience. But it can destroy your ability to communicate effectively.

Case in point, “I just wanted to …”

Author and sales trainer, Jeb Blount, recently said, “You’re saying it on the phone, you’re saying it in emails and InMails, you’re saying it in person … ‘I just wanted to check-in’ … ‘I just wanted to set an appointment’ … ‘I just wanted to grab a few minutes of your time’ … ‘I just wanted to stop by’ … I just wanted to reach out.”

“Just wanted to” is poor grammar. I’ve taken heat from my students on this for a long time. But I feel empowered by Jeb to stand firm. Stop it.

Yes, we should strive to write as we speak. But when we speak weakly, we are average. And average in sales isn’t effective. Especially in digital communications — like voicemail and email.

“‘Just wanted to’ is yesterday … it is passive and weak. It makes you sound insecure,” says Blount.

Perhaps because you are insecure.

The cure? Well, be confident. But also shift to active tense. Take an active stance. Be confident. Don’t sound average!

“Say, ‘I want to.’ Say ‘I am.’ Be active. Be confident,” says Blount. “Because confidence transfers to your prospect. Stop saying, ‘I just wanted to.’ Just stop it.”

Are You Needy?

We all need. To need is human. But needing a reply, a conversation or a closed sale can set you up for communications failure. Just like when we date to find that perfect life partner: The more you communicate, subtly, you really need that second date, the less often you get it.

The more persuasive your tone (during the first date) the less you attract. Because persuading inherently puts you on the defense. It assumes you must convince. Instead, what if you confidently provoked your prospect to convince him/herself? Slowly.

Bottom line: A more confident mental attitude drives more productive behavior. Because confidence attracts, in personal and professional life. Word choice is everything.

“When I stop being needy, I can focus on my reader’s needs — like being respectfully short, factual, interesting … and ending with an implied choice,” says copywriter David Morrison.

“I think of this instruction as a prescription, and I think effective cold email is also a prescription for the reader: declarative, unambiguous, single action,” says Morrison.

Indeed, a cold call or email should be strong in tone. However, to be effective it should not be forceful. Instead, the message’s tone must be openly at peace with rejection.

“Doctor’s don’t beg. They tell you what to do and leave it up to you to follow instructions — and if you want to fix your pain/problem, you decide to take action. No one can persuade you or motivate you to do something. That desire comes from inside.”

Is what you sell prescriptive? Then David’s metaphor works.

Why ‘Pain Points’ Are Such a Pain

Marketers and sellers instinctively push on pain points. If a customer has a pain, tell them you can relieve it. But everyone is pushing information that touches on pains. If you want to blend in with the scenery, pushing on pains is an excellent way to get ignored/deleted.

Also, you cannot start near-term conversations with clients who don’t (yet) realize they have pain. Yet, sellers continue to turn to marketing prose for language that pushes on pains.

Creating Luxury Appeal for Any Brand

So why do many of us spend $55,000 and more on a luxury car that Consumer Reports says won’t perform as well as a much cheaper brand?

So why do many of us spend $55,000 and more on a luxury car that Consumer Reports says won’t perform as well as a much cheaper brand?

And what makes women buy that $40,000 Gucci crocodile handbag when, functionally, it does the very same thing as a $40 knock-off from Target?

According to my friend, Harlan Bratcher, who has been creating and defining luxury as a C-level executive for labels such as Calvin Klein, Armani and Reed Krakoff, it’s all about emotion.

“We don’t necessarily buy a luxury product because of how it’s made, or even its style, but more so because of how it makes us feel,” says Bratcher. “When you drive that $55,000 car, or carry an Hermès or Gucci handbag, consciously, but even more unconsciously, you feel you have achieved your aspirations, even if that aspiration is as simple as feeling good about yourself.”

As the lead personal shopper for Neiman Marcus in the early 1980s at the beginning of his fashion lifestyle career, Bratcher recalls helping women try on $15,000 gowns, watching them slumping as they looked in the mirror. After spending time getting to know them, and helping them feel beautiful inside and out, suddenly that $15,000 dress was worth even more.

If luxury is defined by how a product makes us feel, as suggested by Bratcher, then is it possible for any brand to become a “luxury,” or something for which consumers are willing to pay a premium?

According to the Merriam Webster dictionary, luxury means:

  • a condition or situation of great comfort, ease and wealth
  • something that is expensive and not necessary
  • something that is helpful or welcome and that is not usually or always available

Per the above definition, its seems a product or brand can call itself “luxury” if it makes consumers feel pampered, extravagant and exclusive.

Bratcher offers a different definition:

“A brand becomes a luxury when it becomes aspirational to the consumer. Aspiration can manifest in many ways, from elevated self-esteem, confidence and sense of self; to a personal statement you believe you deserve to make about yourself.”

While aspiration can traditionally be defined as our hopes, dreams and exquisite goals for life, its connection to luxury is taking on a new meaning in today’s consumer-driven climate. Luxury is not just about exclusive products that one in thousands might own. It is about the experience that elevates the perceived value of the product and brand.

“As CEO of Armani Exchange, my mission was to build a highly relevant experience for our customers that made them feel beautiful, energetic and happy, and in ways that helped them associate those feelings with our brand. One way we did this was to research our customers’ favorite music, and then play it loudly at each of our stores, creating that Friday night dance club feeling. Sales and customer loyalty soared.”

Beyond feeling young, urban and sexy from the purchases we make, today’s consumers are demanding a new sensation: altruism.

Research from both Cone Communications and Edelman shows that more than 80 percent of today’s consumers, from Gen Y to Baby Boomers, choose brands which can show the positive social impact they are having on the world. Aligning with social causes – not just fashion trends and glamorous living – is now becoming an essential part of branding for luxury brands in all categories – from designer apparel and vacation resorts to auction houses like Christie’s.

“Consumers today are seeking actualization in all they do, and they do this by finding purpose in their daily lives, from the deeds they do to the products they purchase, “ says Toby Usnik, Chief Social Responsibility Officer for Christie’s in New York City. “Luxury is now about a bigger brand statement than just the product itself. It’s about shared values, a higher purpose and a sustainable community.”

For Christie’s, Usnik has helped contemporize a 250-year old brand through new initiatives for giving back. This includes the creation of Bid to Save The Earth, a coalition charity auction on behalf of four leading environmental groups: Oceana, Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC), Central Park Conservancy, and Conservation International. Over three years, this program earned several million dollars to support its causes, and substantially helped to further Christie’s profile as a luxury brand with far-reaching values.

While some might be tempted to up their price, bling their packaging and call their brand ‘Luxury,” the chances for successfully transforming a great brand to a luxury brand are greater if you follow these simple steps.

Create authentic experiences

  • Armani’s nightclub atmosphere was authentic and spot-on for creating a strong dose of the emotions that make us feel powerful, awesome and in a mood to shop.

Tap into feelings that matter

  • While feelings in a nightclub might be fleeting, especially when you wake up the next morning, the overall consistent feelings of belonging and self-esteem you can create with every shopping experience, service interaction, follow-up communications and events are what maintain a brand’s luxury status.

Preserve the Perception

  • Once you’ve broken out as a brand above the cluttered fray, its critical to maintain your sense of luxury. You can do this not just with exclusive experiences, and short product runs for really amazing items, but with your pricing strategies. As Bratcher and Usnik both suggest, lowering your price, or offering discounts, just reprograms the status of your brand and you may never get back the status you once had.

Engage Customers in Sincere Altruism

  • As Usnik says, long gone are the days when a company buys a table at a charity gala or donates here and there. Leading brands are putting a stake in the ground based on their values and communities. They have skin in the game — creating programs that support those values, having their employees volunteer for related non-profits, sharing their platforms with others committed to the same cause. Doing just that made Warby Parker a huge force in the eyewear industry, because its customers’ purchases give free glasses and vision to disadvantaged people globally.

Albeit trite and cliché to say, luxury is still in the eye of the beholder. But now more than ever, it’s in the heart, as well. Building a brand around authentic values and causes that make people feel they are one step closer to actualization, social and personal aspirations, will help elevate your brand in ways much more powerful than you can imagine.

What are the aspirations or hopes you can associate with your brand to secure loyalty and attract high-value customers? You don’t need to open up shop on Fifth Avenue in NYC to succeed. Instead, focus on the dreams, hopes and core values of your customers, and tell your story in a way that makes them want to be a part of it, and pass it on to others.

Bratcher sums it up:

“No one really needs luxury. It’s nonessential. That’s where the dream and mythology come in. And this is why my career has been about anthropology – making dreams for the moment – more than product lines.”

The No. 1 Most Overlooked Video Content Marketing Strategy

Is your video content marketing strategy producing leads? Most B-to-B marketers are generating views, clicks, shares and likes, but netting few leads. Don’t be one of them. Generating leads and sales with video isn’t difficult if you get back to basics. The trick is publishing videos that create self-confidence in your viewers. This is a faster, easier way to create engaging discussion—and ultimately trust in you.

Is your video content marketing strategy producing leads? Most B-to-B marketers are generating views, clicks, shares and likes, but netting few leads. Don’t be one of them. Generating leads and sales with video isn’t difficult if you get back to basics. The trick is publishing videos that create self-confidence in your viewers. This is a faster, easier way to create engaging discussion—and ultimately trust in you.

What Does Confidence Have to Do With It?
Don’t let any gurus convince you that “social selling” is somehow mystical, new or different.

In video marketing, trust is rarely earned by what you say in videos or how you say it. Trust is earned by what your videos DO for prospects that gets them confident in themselves as buyers.

For example, have you ever watched and taken action on a short video? Maybe it was a direct TV infomercial where you saw a product demo. You probably didn’t need what was being sold, but you took action anyway. Why?

Confidence.

Even if it’s purely novel, after watching a product demo humans are “hard wired” to react. But only if we witness a transfer of confidence—from seller to buyer. Or from “the converted” to the skeptic.

If written, shot, edited and distributed correctly, videos of various lengths can produce leads consistently. These exceptional videos succeed because they do one thing better than others.

Why Confidence Works So Well
You might think going viral is the key, but it’s not. Videos that create leads work because they demonstrate raw, credible, believable confidence in action.

Videos that generate leads tap into skepticism, fear, annoyance and ambition—and put it to work for the seller. Again, think in terms of infomercials: from kitchen gadgets (skepticism) to fear (financial and medical) or ambition (college, weight loss).

Effective video “brings to life” the benefits of the emotional end goal of everyone on planet earth: confidence. No, not the functional benefits of the product, the emotional end benefit in its most raw state.

Where to Start: How to Create Confidence
Effective videos grab attention. They have a title that is simply irresistible and relates to a fear, ambition, goal or problem. Effective titles make a promise. An effective video content marketing strategy delivers that promise in a way that either:

  1. transfers confidence from someone on camera to the viewer or
  2. manufactures confidence by giving tips, actionable advice or “better ways.”

The best way to get started is a video treatment—a rough concept of how your video will flow. The easiest kind of video to produce is one that increases the success rate of prospects.

Right now, think about something you know that most customers don’t. What danger, risk or hidden opportunity do you know about that they don’t, right now. What would really move prospects’ needles if you had 60 seconds to tell them? Jot down your ideas.

Create a video treatment that demonstrates a better way, shows steps to solve a problem or provokes an emotional reaction (fear, excitement) in the viewer. Don’t be shy.

For example, ask a question customers need answered in a way that might scare viewers a bit. Then answer it in a way that leaves them wanting more details.

When and How to Make a Call to Action
The goal of your B-to-B video content marketing strategy is to get prospects so confident in themselves they take action. Everything else is wasting time. Forget about trying to influence prospects. Get viewers to act.

If you followed the above formula, you’re on track. Now we need to nudge viewers with a call to action. This nudge capitalizes on the momentary confidence you just created or transferred to the viewer.

At this point, customers should be starting to feel a sense of trust in your words. You’ve proven yourself to be bold, have something to say, ask the tough questions or give out “tough love” advice. Will they trust you enough to buy from you? Maybe, maybe not.

Prospects will, however, be willing to trade their contact information in exchange for more of that confidence you just gave them.

They’ll be more willing to become a lead. All they need is that call to action. Make it easy for prospects to act on that impulse you just created.

Effective Video Content Marketing Makes Prospects Crave More
Content that creates leads makes prospects think, “Gosh, I wonder what else the author of this article knows that I need to know!” or “Wow, I see the opportunity more clearly now; how can I get access to more of this kind of thinking?”

Maybe your offer will be to teach customers a new skill or go deeper into solving a problem for them. You might offer a multi-part video tutorial, ebook or stream of email tips that guide and motivate prospects each week.

There are a handful of options. The idea is to use a call to action to get viewers off your video and onto a lead nurturing process.

Remember: Trust is earned by what your videos do for prospects that gets them confident in themselves. If you follow these simple guidelines you’ll be making videos that sell for you. You’ll have an effective video content marketing strategy.

Good luck!

How to Create Content That Converts

It’s time to stop creating compelling content and start creating content that converts. The “create compelling content” mantra has failed us. We’re awash in a sea of ineffective, self-centered articles, videos, ebooks and whitepapers that fail to create leads. So follow these three handy success principles to create content that converts.

It’s time to stop creating compelling content and start creating content that converts. The “create compelling content” mantra has failed us. We’re awash in a sea of ineffective, self-centered articles, videos, ebooks and whitepapers that fail to create leads. So follow these three handy success principles to create content that converts.

3 Guiding Principles of Content That Converts
These are the three success principles powering today’s content marketing success stories like HubSpot and a handful of others. Now it’s time for you to apply them and create content that converts for you.

Content that converts does three things. It creates …

  1. Action: Customers cannot resist DOING stuff with it—including signing up to become a lead.
  2. Results: It doesn’t just impart knowledge; it increases the success rate of prospects (for free).
  3. Confidence: Buyers ultimately convert based on trust created by positive results.

Create Confidence
For years we’ve been told “create compelling content!” So we got busy. The goal was clear: get customers to consider, select and buy from us.

But for most of us, videos go unnoticed. Blogs aren’t shortening the sales cycle. Well, you’re not alone in taking your eye off of what works, and that’s confidence.

The difference between content that converts and all the other crap out there is simple: It gives prospects a free sample or “taste” of actual success. Real results.

Content that creates leads and sales uses results to manufacture confidence in buyers.

I know, I know. It isn’t very sexy. We’ve been engaging transparently, branding authentically, telling compelling stories … and let’s not forget the customer advocacy we’re fostering. But the truth is nothing works as well at creating leads as confidence.

Why Customers Will Ask You for the Sale
Let’s say you apply an idea from this blog post and have success with it. Maybe you take action on the three success principles and start getting more (and better) leads with your blog. Because of this experience, you sign up for my free training course where you learn more and experience more success.

Would those positive results be powerful enough to make you crave more? If I helped you change the way you’re blogging (to the degree you started getting more and better leads) would that be powerful enough to make you reach out to me?

Might you write an email to me saying, “Jeff, you’ve helped me see things differently and start to improve how I’m blogging. I’m actually getting leads now. Thanks, Jeff. This is so cool. How can I turn up the volume on this? What’s next?”

In other words, could I somehow convince you, through experiencing a steady stream of my content, to ask ME for the sale a few weeks from now?
Answer: Yes, a significant percentage of people who read this blog post will, likely, convert for me.

Move the Needle
My goal for you, right now, is for you to finish reading this post, apply my tips and experience an increase in success. Period. Forget about you liking me or even sharing my content. That’s not my goal. First I need to get you confident. I need to move your needle.

If I truly deliver results, you’ll share the good news (advocate for me). You’ll likely consider and possibly even buy from me. Why? Because I just proved myself.

This is how you use social media and content marketing to create leads. By creating a little bit of success in people’s lives through what you publish—helpful blogs, ebooks that guide, videos that teach, checklists that speed things up, whitepapers that create curiosity, tutorials that help people learn, etc.

Why Give Away ALL of Your Best Advice
Let’s get real. I’m not getting paid to give you my best tips and advice in this article. So why would I?

Answer: Because I don’t have time to worry about if you are actually my competitor, hoping to steal my material. I’m not losing sleep wondering if you’re going to take these instructions and do it yourself—without ever buying my coaching program. Neither should you.

You need to get customers’ success to increase—because of you. You need to get them confident. You need to get them doing something meaningful with knowledge that is truly new, insightful, powerful.

Because ultimately the knowledge WILL be given to them. They will discover the details of “how to do _______,” which you would prefer to sell them. Some customers will do it themselves because they can’t afford it otherwise.

Others will be able to afford to hire you, try it, fail and return to the market as a highly motivated buyer.

The only thing for you to decide on is who they will return to. Because the most likely selection they’ll make is the business or person who gave them the instructions.

So how did I do? Do you now feel an urge to DO something with what I shared? Because I now want you to do something that moves the needle. I don’t care if you see me as a thought leader or want to follow me. I want to sell something to you if it’s right for you. That’s why I gave you my very best tips and insights. Let me know how I did in comments or shoot me an email?

Blogging for Sales Leads: The No. 1 Reason Your Blog Isn’t Getting It Done

I used to believe in blogging authentically, transparently, telling good stories and being a thought leader, but these ideas consistently failed to generate leads for me. That’s because I was missing the one, essential piece that content marketing and blogging gurus don’t even know about: Use a blog to create confidence in the buyer—not me, my brand or my business.

I used to believe in blogging authentically, transparently, telling good stories and being a thought leader, but these ideas consistently failed to generate leads for me. That’s because I was missing the one, essential piece that content marketing and blogging gurus don’t even know about: Use a blog to create confidence in the buyer—not me, my brand or my business.

Today’s most successful B-to-B sellers are using blogs to do one thing really well: prove they’re worth investing in before customers pay a dime. They’re giving customers a few results and letting them experience what success feels like.

Blog to Help Prospects Believe in ThemselvesNot in You
The blogging gurus love to tell us to build trust with prospects using social media. Yet they never mention the best way to build enough trust to close a sale. (probably because they’ve never actually closed a sale)

I’m talking about helping a buyer get so confident in themselves—so sure that buying will give them everything they want—they can’t help themselves. They buy because they cannot argue against not buying anymore! (and of their own free will, of course)

Enter social media and all the bogus short-cuts we’ve been told will create trust. Telling stories, being honest, showing customers our “human side.” These things might help you foster trust but only if you apply them to help prospects get more confident in themselves.

Give Prospects Results In AdvanceNo Excuses
What’s the connection between convincing a prospect to buy through your blog and giving them overwhelming confidence? How do you execute this idea without wasting time? You create a process that manufactures “mini-successes” for prospects—in advance of their purchase.

This is the practical, tried-and-true strategy at the center of every blog that creates leads.

Start blogging in ways that prove your product or service is worth investing in. Start giving prospects a free taste of success before they purchase.

Help them do something that they really need to do, learn or accomplish. This gives them partial satisfaction (in themselves) and creates hunger for more. Not hunger for your product or service.

Hunger for more satisfaction in themselves.

Give It Away—All of It
If this sounds like a free trial you’re right but let’s say you’re selling a complex product or service. You’ll need to go further—convince prospects to buy based on what you’ve actually done for them lately.

I’m describing a situation where buying what you sell isn’t a point of consideration; it’s a logical next step for your prospect to take. Purchasing becomes part of the journey your prospect is already on.

By doing meaningful things for people that actually move the needle (solve a problem, teach a skill, etc.) prospects build a sense of achievement. Even if it’s a small one potential customers build trust in you based on this sense.

They begin to trust in your ability to deliver the FULL result if they were to actually buy from you.

Make sure your blog articles, video tutorials, white papers, ebooks and such are:

  1. Taking prospects on a journey toward (or away from) what it is you sell and
  2. creating confidence along the way by solving problems and/or teaching them new skills.

Lots of Examples…
This strategy is at the heart of thriving companies like HubSpot. I, myself, apply the technique to generate leads for a social media sales training program. Sure, money back guarantees help us close, so do customer testimonials. But nothing works better than giving away my best knowledge and helping prospects begin to experience actual success.

Nothing creates trust like having a material impact on your prospects’ lives before they buy. Nothing. Because it proves you’re able to create success for them and willing to prove it up front.

Again, all you’re really doing is building prospects’ confidence in themselves that they cannot argue with.

Look at every one of the social media sales success stories I’ve documented on this blog, in the magazine or on my other blog. Each of these B-to-B social selling success stories are finding a way to give out samples of results in advance.

Every successful B-to-B social seller I’ve found ever (and I do this full time!) is helping prospects get confident in themselves as buyers—before they’re doing anything else.

Let’s be honest. Can you really afford to not blog in ways that give prospects miniature versions of what it is you’re so darn good at? Especially when your competitors probably are—or are thinking of it?

5 Pillars of the Mobile Marketing Industry

All emerging industries reach a point where their ecosystem’s members find common and fundamental concepts that help them organize their thoughts and actions in order to ensure the long-term growth and success of their businesses. For mobile marketing, those fundamentals have emerged and can be boiled down to five verbs: promote, measure, educate, guide and protect.

All emerging industries reach a point where their ecosystem’s members find common and fundamental concepts that help them organize their thoughts and actions in order to ensure the long-term growth and success of their businesses. For mobile marketing, those fundamentals have emerged and can be boiled down to five verbs: promote, measure, educate, guide and protect.

In September, the Mobile Marketing Association (MMA) refined its messaging along these five pillars to improve its ability to efficiently communicate with the market and to forge forward with its mission to help foster a growing and sustainable mobile marketing industry. The following list highlights the measurable objectives of each of these pillars:

  • Promote. Promote mobile marketing best practices, standards, thought-leadership and industry leaders (e.g., brands, agencies, media companies, application providers, etc.) to foster innovation and industry development.
  • Educate. Provide structured, evidence-based curriculum to educate brands, agencies and consumers about the full scale and scope of mobile marketing practices to highlight their advantages and benefits and to ensure that all players can develop a common understanding of each other’s goals and motivations so that they may efficiently and effectively co-create value between them for their mutual benefit.
  • Measure. As we enter into the “digital age,” where all engagements, moods, preferences, interests and intentions can be digitally imprinted, the key to successful mutual value creation between marketers and consumers will be achieved through the teasing out of insights and knowledge from the vast amounts of data that’s being managed by consumers and marketers alike. In today’s digital world, consumers have as much information as marketers; both need to measure their activities (e.g., total spend in industry, effectiveness of one medium versus another to accomplish one’s goals) to ensure they’re optimizing their time, energy and money.
  • Guide. We all need guidance. By continuing to amass thought-leadership, best practices and self-regulatory codes of conduct, mobile marketers can continue to foster and grow the industry.
  • Protect. Protect consumers and your businesses. All mobile marketers need to pay special attention to the needs of each constituent in the marketplace, and ensure an even playing field for all to help maximize public and industry confidence in mobile marketing, lower barriers to entry and minimize noneconomic costs of doing business.

More than words
These five pillars aren’t just shibboleths. They’re designed to provide the mobile marketing industry with actionable concepts that are key for maintaining growth.

Here’s a real-world example: A recent MMA survey of U.S. advertisers and ad agencies shows strong confidence in mobile marketing’s reach and effectiveness — so much so that they plan to increase their spending 124 percent to more than $5.4 billion by the end of 2011. This projected increase reflects advertiser and agency plans to shift their budgets out of media such as print and outdoor and into the mobile channel.

The “measure” pillar plays a key role by providing the confidence that in turn enables this kind of growth. It’s easier for brands and agencies to justify those dramatic increases and strategy shifts when they have access to independent, primary analytics showing consumer interest in and adoption of mobile services.

But measurement is possible only when everyone is using the same baselines and definitions. The MMA recently worked with the Interactive Advertising Bureau to define what constitutes a mobile ad impression.

Another example of measurement is via independent research. An April 2010 survey conducted by the MMA and one of its official research partners, Luth Research, found that nearly one in four U.S. adult consumers uses mobile location services. Nearly half of those who noticed any ads while using location-based services took at least some action, indicating that consumers respond well to ads through location-based services. That’s the kind of actionable intelligence that brands and agencies need to make the most of the mobile opportunity.

The “promote” pillar plays an equally important role in helping drive industry growth. Case studies, for example, explain how and why certain campaigns are highly successful. This information gives brands and agencies the actionable insights necessary to develop and execute their own strategies, and it complements “measure” by providing additional confidence that the mobile channel will put their marketing budget to highly effective use.

Effectiveness depends partly on the actions of the industry as a whole. That’s where the “educate” pillar comes in. The MMA’s certification program is designed to educate marketing professionals about how to use the mobile channel effectively and appropriately.

That process starts with protecting the consumer experience and the efficiency of the market’s systems so that all players can grow their businesses in a sustainable fashion. Industry-standard guidelines such as the MMA’s “U.S. Consumer Best Practices” and “Code of Conduct for Mobile Marketing” are part of the “guide” pillar, which enables the self-regulation that helps grow the mobile opportunity.

The MMA’s role as guide includes providing a framework so that the mobile industry can create these kinds of documents, which ensure that brands, agencies, developers, carriers and other ecosystem members are all on the same page — and moving forward.

Promote, measure, educate, guide and protect. Five verbs that provide focus and momentum to the ongoing development of a burgeoning industry. Everyone can contribute, you just have to find the area that excites you the most, jump in and get engaged.