Technical vs. Creative: Who Should Manage On-Page SEO?

“Good fences make good neighbors.” That is a line from Robert Frost’s early 20th century poem “The Mending Wall,” and it’s also a relevant philosophy when determining who’s responsible for your on-site SEO.

“Good fences make good neighbors.”

That is a line from Robert Frost’s early 20th century poem “The Mending Wall,” and it’s also a relevant philosophy when determining who’s responsible for your on-page SEO.

Whoa — sounds like quite the leap, right? Not really. Frost’s poem is about two neighbors who, despite having no livestock or overhanging trees, meet each year to repair a stone wall that separates their properties. One neighbor implores the other to give up their annual ritual, while the other simply repeats,

“Good fences make good neighbors.”

The full meaning of Frost’s poem is up for interpretation. The neighbors carry out their task of reinforcing the barrier between them. But in doing so, they collaborate and work together. They meet at an agreed upon boundary and debate without conflict. Then they go on, maintaining their separate lives, one as a pine tree grower and the other as an apple farmer.

How does this apply to your website’s on-page SEO? Read on, and I’ll explain.

SEOs and Content Creators: Farmers of Different Crops

Farming isn’t just a career path — it’s a lifestyle choice. You can draw many general similarities between farmers, such as they love working outdoors, they enjoy living in the country and they like to work with their hands. They appreciate the cycles of growth and harvests. They are experts at monitoring, analyzing and adapting to produce the most bountiful crops.

Similar things can be said about people who work in SEO. They’re tech savvy and prefer constantly evolving, fast-paced environments. They enjoy the rush of earning high-ranking search results. They tend to be balanced creatively and analytically; they don’t shy away from complex data, yet they’re artistic enough to understand how websites, social media pages and other online assets could be made more engaging for visitors.

Look closer, though — especially at SEO marketers and webpage content creators — and they are far from mirror images.

Cool Tech for Content Curation, Project Management

When assessing the best tools for content curation and project management, it’s important to identify what your needs are before diving into possible solutions.

When assessing the best tools for content curation and project management, it’s important to identify what your needs are before diving into possible solutions.

Need to share reliable social media content, quickly? Try Buffer. Want to keep better tabs on your editorial and social media calendars? Experiment with Trello. Looking for a marketing automation tool to synchronize your messaging across platforms? Go for IFTTT. These tools not only enhance workflow, they help streamline team communication and collaboration.

content curation, project management

Content Curation, Social Media Scheduling Tool: Buffer

buffer-connectBuffer is useful for those with small blogs (like this) who are managing social media calendars on-the-go. One of the best features is “Content Inbox,” a source for curated content tailored to the interests of your followers. You can easily push this content to your Twitter, Google+, Facebook and Instagram accounts to keep your audiences engaged throughout the day and your messaging consistent. Visit the “Analytics” tab for more on how your posts performed and even schedule top performers to Re-Buffer at a later date.

twitter-analytics1Buffer is also useful for social media scheduling with its built-in queue. You can either set your own post schedule or let Buffer choose for you based on past user engagement data.

buffer-schedule

There’s no doubt that Buffer is essential for social media marketers, content creators and anyone else looking to take control of their many social media accounts. Give Buffer a try to keep your curated content flowing without any hiccups.

Editorial Calendar, Project Management Tool: Trello

Trello is by far the most intuitive, visual and powerful tool out there for small blog creators to keep tabs on their editorial calendar. Trello is incredibly easy to learn for any type of user (whether beginner or advanced). Create lists and then drag-and-drop cards within them to supercharge the publishing process.

Trello

Label cards, add team members and use Power-Ups to integrate with Google Drive, Twitter, Slack and more. This is incredibly important for small bloggers, as content should be strictly managed and shared with the team throughout the conceptualization process.

Trello scheduling Kia Street

We use Trello for just about everything at st-tech — including our own personal to-dos. The platform’s versatility and usability make it a must-try.

Marketing Automation Tool: IFTTT

IFTTT is a fascinating automation tool in which you can create recipes that allow communication between your devices, apps and systems via the Internet of Things (IoT). This tool is heavily used for marketing automation, as well as boosting personal productivity. The interface is simple and designing recipes is even easier now, thanks to IFTTT applets.

How to Use IFTTT

IFTTT Kia blog post tech

If This, Then That is best for those who utilize a ton of Web apps and services on a daily basis. So, how does IFTTT work? You start by selecting a recipe and turning it on. Recipes are easily programmable to fit your needs as you’re able to use “ingredients” that add custom specifications.

IFTTT Kia blog post

Crafting your own recipe is perfect for those who wish to have more targeted control over their relationship with the IoT. However, there are also tons of preset applets from IFTTT’s collections that are widely beneficial, as well.

Here are three recommendations for small bloggers using IFTTT:

  1. Use Google Calendar to keep track of your Buffer posting schedule
  2. When you create a new Trello card, add an event to Google Calendar
  3. Archive every time you’re @mentioned on Twitter to a Google spreadsheet

Whether you’re a content contributor, small blogger or community manager — these tools will help you take your content to the next level.

Which tool is your favorite? Let me know in the comments section below.

A Pile of Content Is Not the Answer

“Can you just create some compelling content that everyone will love?” Ever hear that? Well, that’s not how a content marketing strategy works: There is no magic fairy dust to sprinkle over the content creators to make them generate more, fabulous content. (Trust me, I wish it was that simple.)

Raise your hand if you’ve heard this, or some approximation of this:

Compelling Content MemeAnd how many times did you cringe and make this face/gesture before quietly retreating?

Firefly Mal gifThat’s not how a content marketing strategy works: There is no magic fairy dust to sprinkle over the content creators to make them generate more, fabulous content. (Trust me, that would come in really handy during busy weeks).

And to piggyback off of that, no one should be patting themselves on the back for producing a bucket full of content assets … “Hey CMO, look at me … in six months my team has created 48 blog posts, 25 whitepapers, 12 webinars and a partridge in a pear tree!” The question in response to that should be, “And how do they all work together to deliver a customer experience?” Usually the answer is the faint thrum of crickets.

But Wait, There’s Hope!

If Joe Pulizzi is the Godfather of Content Marketing, then Robert Rose is The Consigliere … or if we want to take a step away from organized crime references, he’s the REALLY smart uncle who knows just as much as the Godfather, and honestly, why isn’t he … okay, getting off track.

So. Robert Rose. Super cool guy, super smart guy, and I got to meet him last year at Content Marketing World. When the editorial team got together in the spring to pitch session ideas for our Integrated Marketing Virtual Conference this year, I suggested the topic of repurposing content (very hot), and then said, “Hey, what if we ask Robert?”

Flash forward to now, a handful of days after the virtual show, and yes, Robert was able to join us, yes he delivered a fantastic session titled “The Content Show That Never Ends: Repurposing Like a Media Company,” and yes I created the following meme about 10 minutes after the session wrapped (priorities, folks):

Hey Frank memeSo in those 30 dazzling minutes what did we learn?

  • In every great content-driven experience you hear people raving about, it’s the collection of assets, not any one, that provides value.
  • A reusable content plan that can be measured in multiple ways over time can only help your marketing strategy.
  • More common than not, marketers have a disconnected pile of assets, and they’re unable to measure the efficacy of a program because it’s not program. Instead, it’s tactical support of a campaign. Or as Robert quipped, “You have assets coming out of assets.”
  • You can build a better content marketing strategy if you start at the end.

RRIMV_slideNow, this is just a mere taste of what Robert shared with IMV attendees, and I don’t want to share any more than this because you’re doing yourself a disservice if you don’t listen to the man himself.

Good news for you: If you missed the show on Thursday, it’s on-demand until Sept. 27! Register, if you haven’t already, and check out Robert’s presentation (and then stick around for a few of the others to get other aspects of your marketing in order).

It’ll get you thinking about how you can smartly repurpose content, but better yet, it’ll help you reframe how you look at content and the customer experience.