SEO Vs. PPC: 5 ‘Power Tips’ to Drive Organic Traffic to Your Website

OK, so you have a website. Blood, sweat and tears (as well as cash!) have gone into getting this thing up and running. You’ve used all your creative juices to get the words just right. And you added some nice graphics to make the site aesthetically pleasing. Now what? A website is of little use if nobody can find it. It’s kind of like having a telephone book ad with no contact information … it’s practically useless.

OK, so you have a website. Blood, sweat and tears (as well as cash!) have gone into getting this thing up and running. You’ve used all your creative juices to get the words just right. And you added some nice graphics to make the site aesthetically pleasing. Now what?

A website is of little use if nobody can find it. It’s kind of like having a telephone book ad with no contact information … it’s practically useless.

Mastering organic search ranking has proven to be a fundamental part of the online marketing mix. (By “organic,” I mean the “natural,” as opposed to “paid/PPC,” listing that appears when someone conducts a search on Google or other search engines. Optimal placement is typically within the first 20 listings or three pages.)

Search engine marketing (SEM) and search engine optimization (SEO)—the ability to increase your site’s visibility in organic search listings and refine the content structure on the site itself—are critical for market awareness and customer acquisition.

An eye-tracking study showed that about 50 percent of viewers begin their search scan at the top of the organic listing results. Other studies show that about 70 percent of Web surfers click on organic listings before they click on a sponsored link.

Don’t let your site get lost in the Internet Black Hole, when there are five simple ways to help boost your website’s traffic and optimization.

1. Create online buzz about your site, product or service. You can do this by generating free online press releases. There are distribution services on the Web that offer no-cost packages, sites such as PRlog.org, Free-press-release.com and others. You can also post a link to your news release to targeted social marketing sites like LinkedIn (relevant groups), Facebook, Twitter as well as high-traffic blogs.

2. Initiate a relevant inbound link program. Set up a reciprocal link page or blog roll (a listing of URLs on a blog, as opposed to a website) that can house links from industry sites. Contact these sites to see if they’d be willing to swap links with you—a link to your site for a link to theirs. Relevance, rank and quality are key when selecting link-building partner sites. Search engines shun link harvesting (collecting links from random websites that have no relevance to your site), so these links should be from sites that are similar in nature to your business.

3. Give Web searchers great content and a link back to your site. Upload original, “UVA” (useful, valuable and actionable) and relevant editorial to high quality content directories such as eZinearticles.com, ArticlesBase.com and Goarticles.com. There are also more niche directories that focus on topics like health and investing. This is a great way to increase market awareness, as well as establish an inbound link to your site. Content should be targeted to the directory and audience you want to get in front of. There is also a syndication opportunity, as third-party sites may come across your article when doing a Web search and republish your content on their own websites. As long as third parties give your site editorial attribution and a link, getting them to republish your content is just another distribution channel for you to consider. For more information how to effectively master content marketing, search engine algorithms and Google updates, read my blog entry titled, “Is the ‘A’ in SONAR (article marketing) still a viable tactic with search engines and the Farmer/PANDA updates?

4. Website pages should be keyword-rich and related to your business.
Make a list of your top 10 to 15 keywords and variations of those words and incorporate them into the copy on your site (avoiding the obvious repetition of words). Search engines crawl Web pages from top to bottom, so your strongest keywords should be in that order on your home page and sub-pages (the most relevant on the top, the least relevant on the bottom).

You’ll want to do the same for your tagging. Make sure your title tags (the descriptions at the top of each page) and meta tags are unique and chock full of keywords. And your alt tags/alt attributions (images) should have relevant descriptions, as well.

5. List your site in online directories and classified sites by related category or region. This is an effective way to increase exposure and get found by prospects searching specifically for information on your product or service by keyword topic. Popular directories (like Business.com) typically have a nominal fee. But there are many other directories and classified sites (like Dmoz.org, Info.com, Superpages.com and Craigslist.org) that are free and can be targeted by location and product (offer) type.

Most important, before you start your SEO initiatives, don’t forget to establish a baseline for your site so you can measure pre- vs. post-SEO tactics. Upload a site counter (which counts the number of visits to your website), obtain your site’s traffic ranking at Alexa.com or Quantcast.com, or get your site’s daily visit average (from Google Analytics or another application)—and then chart your weekly progress in Excel.

Understand that with organic search, it may take several months for a site to be optimized and gain search engine traction … so be patient. You will eventually see results. And if you set up your website correctly to harness the surge of traffic you will receive, you can also monetize the traffic visits for lead generation or sales.

Create a Bucket List

Whether you’re new to database marketing or a seasoned pro looking for some new idea to get your creative juices flowing, one of the most useful, and impactful, activities you can embark upon is to create what is called a “Bucket List.”

Whether you’re new to database marketing or a seasoned pro looking for some new idea to get your creative juices flowing, one of the most useful, and impactful, activities you can embark upon is to create what is called a “Bucket List.”

No, I’m not talking about a building a list of activities that you and a middle-aged companion wish to complete before you shed this mortal coil. I’m talking about taking a long, hard, and close look at your customers or prospects and getting to know them—really getting to know them—well enough to create broad classifications about who they are, what they do, what they like, and what affinities they share.

Remember, at the end of the day, database marketing is about sending out the right message to the right people at the right time—and, hopefully, achieving the desired response from the customer or prospect as a result. And without proper customer segmentation, this task simply cannot be done cost effectively, if at all.

Now, of course, there are many great customer segmentation models out there you can use. In a great article titled “Selecting a Customer Segmentation Approach” by Andrew Banasiewicz, Director of Analytic Services at Epsilon, four groups are identified: Predictive, Descriptive, Behavioral and Attitudinal.

Out of these four, the Predictive and Attitudinal models are arguably the most popular and widely used. Predictive is a model that uses value segments driven by customer purchase behaviors, extrapolating past behavior into future actions. An Attitudinal model, on the other hand, identifies affinity segments based on respondents’ expressed attitudes toward a company’s brand or products.

Now of course this list isn’t exhaustive and there are other models you can use. One popular alternative is Psychographic Profiling, which is used widely in the B-to-C space. In this model, consumers are assigned into groups according to their lifestyle, personality, attitude, interests and values.

Many B-to-B marketers, on the other hand, may prefer to use a segmentation model based on Firmographic variables, such as industry, number of locations, annual sales, job function and so on. Many software companies, not surprisingly, trend toward usage-based profiling, which includes variables, such as type of device used (desktop, tablet, mobile device), Operating System and so on.

One important fact that’s routinely overlooked is that successful customer segmentation requires taking a holistic approach. This includes aligning a firm’s segmentation goals to its marketing objectives and data acquisition investments. In other words, the data you have will determine not only which model you use, but also what marketing campaigns you’re able to run.

Now of course both data inputs and needs are in flux throughout the firm’s lifecycle. As Banasiewicz points out, for a firm in high-growth customer acquisition mode an Attitudinal model might work effectively for demand generation initiatives among qualified and segmented pools of prospects. Marketing campaigns in this scenario, we can assume, would speak to customer desires and affinities, with purpose of lead generation/nurture.

On the other hand, once the firm has acquired a large pool of customers, it’s not unrealistic to think that transitioning to a Behavioral model using inputs from past purchases will be more effective for running what are now CRM campaigns, focusing on driving lifetime value and repeat purchases.

Different groups not only have different attributes and attitudes, but consume different types of media. As such, they will respond to different types of offers, communicated in different ways and in different places. Where should a firm spend its marketing budget? Online display, email, direct mail, social media, print? … The choices are dizzying in today’s multichannel environment. Having a robust customer segmentation model can definitely help in the decision-making process.

Another important feature of customer segmentation is the realization that different customer groups can not only have wildly different demographic and psychographic identities, but very often will have strikingly varying lifetime values. To the surprise of some, a customer segment with a with younger average age will very often have a higher lifetime value than a group far senior to them, despite having far less disposable income to spend today. This may be based solely on the fact that the younger customers have, simply by being younger, many more years of being a loyal customer ahead of them. Taking this into account, many brands’ obsession with successfully penetrating the youth market should come as no surprise.

Now of course it’s easy to miss the forest for the trees, as customer segmentation is simply a means to an end, not an end in itself. Once you have broken your customers or prospects down into segments, the trickier (and for those who are not data geeks) more fun part of the equation involves devising incentive and reward strategies for each segment, and creating compelling marketing messages and collateral that can be used to get the message out across the various marketing channels. Knowing your customers, this part is a lot easier, which brings me full circle back to my point from the top: Create a bucket list.