Chicago With a Purpose: Wrapping up the DMA2013 Session Picks

With apology, I want to say that this blog is a little about me—what topics I’m interested in, and sharing a little bit of this knowledge (or lack of knowledge) with blog readers. In the process, I’m hopeful you’re doing the same bit of pre-conference research—because it is this forethought and planning, beyond the engagements and booth visits on the Exhibit Hall floor, which make for a truly informative DMA13 conference

With apology, I want to say that this blog is a little about me—what topics I’m interested in, and sharing a little bit of this knowledge (or lack of knowledge) with blog readers. In the process, I’m hopeful you’re doing the same bit of pre-conference research—because it is this forethought and planning, beyond the engagements and booth visits on the Exhibit Hall floor, which make for a truly informative DMA13 conference

With the Direct Marketing Association Annual Conference starting literally at the end of this week, I’m still at it here lining up MyDMA2013 schedule with sessions I’d like to attend—admittedly doing some double-booking because of the great, comprehensive content on offer.

Yes clients and professional colleagues are on hand, and I’ll be sitting in on some of their sessions—but my guideposts for session picks are simply the subjects to which I welcome new learning, new updates and state-of-the-art in data-driven marketing such as it is. That’s why “The DMA” is always a conference attendance “must.”

A few weeks back, I cataloged some of first-impression session and events picks here: http://targetmarketing.adweek.com/blog/creeping-up-fast-dma13-making-plans-chicago

I’m hopeful our paths will cross in Chicago as I add 10+1 to the session wish list here…

  1. Who drives client relationships and customer engagement today? Advertising. “Mad Men + Data Specialists: When Two Worlds Collide,” Tuesday, Oct. 15, 9 a.m. to 9:45 a.m.
  2. Follow the money (and media) trail… “Outlook 2014: Data Driven Marketing in an Omnichannel World,” with The Winterberry Group’s Bruce Biegel, darnnit, also Tuesday, Oct. 15, 9 a.m. to 9:45 a.m.
  3. And trending too, “B2B Trends in 2014” with SAP’s Jerry Nichols, B-to-B magazine’s Chris Hosford and leading biz marketing consultant Pam Ansley Evans: Monday, Oct. 14, 11:15 a.m. to 12:15 p.m.
  4. “The Big Data Ecosystem: Informing Effective Marketing Campaigns,” with Time Warner Cable—curses, also yet again, Tuesday, Oct.15, 9 a.m. to 9:45 a.m. This is really a parochial pick, since my apartment building is now allowing RCN to enter my building—and I’m curious to see (finally) if TWC will give me a better deal on pricing its services.
  5. Multichannel (yet digital) ROI—too bad we don’t have offline here, too, but it has some client-side folks, “No BS, Strictly ROI: Definitive Case Study Panel on Successful Multichannel Digital Marketing” with Intercontinental Hotels Group, Travel Impressions, Equifax and FedEx, Wednesday, Oct. 16, 9 a.m. to 9:45 a.m.
  6. Pinterest + Email = Customer Engagement, with Sony and (disclosure, former client) The Agency Inside Harte-Hanks—now here’s a social media case study that taps Pinterest users, first I’ve seen in a venue that I’ve attended, Tuesday, Oct. 15, 11:30 a.m. to 12:15 p.m.
  7. “Creative Masterclass” with “THE” Herschell Gordon Lewis, and it won’t be a horror film classic (one of Herschell’s other talents), but I know it will be entertaining, focusing as it will on word choices and testing with minimal waste. Afterall, we all should test and choose our words carefully, on Monday, Oct. 14, 11:15 a.m. to 12:15 p.m.
  8. “USPS Goes Mobile: Direct Mail Integration with Mobile Technology”—hey this is a postal-focused blog, and USPS is offering postage discounts here, so there is money to be made/saved: Monday, Oct. 14, 3 p.m. to 4 p.m.
  9. Evaluating marketing service providers—”Why You Must Look at Least Three: Solutions Showdown.” Yes Bernice Grossman—database marketing extraordinaire—has lined up Neolane, SDL and IBM to help us evaluate and compare leading trigger-marketing vendors, on Tuesday, Oct. 15, 2 p.m. to3 p.m
  10. The elusive attribution question gets answered, at least by Petco: “Power-Up: How Petco Uses IBM Marketing to Drive Attribution.” OK, this is an IBM-sponsored track on real-time and automated marketing, but I know many brands struggle with attribution assignment in multichannel and omnichannel environments, so I’d like to hear this case study, Monday, Oct. 14, oh well also 3 p.m. to 4 p.m.
  11. AND a BONUS: Speaking of real-time marketing, my editor Thorin McGee at Target Marketing, is moderating his own panel on “Real-Time Marketing: Tools and Techniques to Own the Moment,” on Wednesday, 10 am – 10:45 am. Do I get extra credit for mentioning this one? Afterall, this blog post was a bit behind his deadline—though I’m hopeful it will be posted on time!

See you in Chicago!

What Is ‘Omnichannel’? And Is It Different From ‘Multichannel’?

This is the year of “omnichannel” based on the amount of occurrences that I’ve heard this term. I’ve never been a fan of jargon—but I sure use it enough in some of my clients’ communications, often at their request. When I comply, I usually advise that a short explanation may be in order upon first reference to help define whatever the term is and to set a marketplace expectation. So what does “omnichannel” mean to me?

This is the year of “omnichannel” based on the amount of occurrences that I’ve heard this term.

I’ve never been a fan of jargon—but I sure use it enough in some of my clients’ communications, often at their request. When I comply, I usually advise that a short explanation may be in order upon first reference to help define whatever the term is and to set a marketplace expectation.

Often enough, analyst firms rush to fill the void too, explaining such terms as “big data,” “customer experience,” “customer engagement” and the like.

The good thing about being marketers and communicators is that we are all also consumers and business people and are able to put our own perspectives on the customer side of the equation. We all recognize we have more power now as consumers (though we’ve always had ultimate power in the wallet), and that what was once pure hit-or-miss with advertising (the consumer side of spray-and-pray) is more often, today, data-driven dialogue with the many brands we use.

So what does “omnichannel” mean to me, as a consumer?

  1. That a brand that I choose to use—and possibly have a data-based relationship with—will recognize me uniquely as a customer, no matter what the channel.
  2. That the data such brands may have about me is shared throughout the organization, so that all parts of the organization—sales, marketing, customer service, finance, in-store, Web, mobile, social, partners, service providers—can act in coordination.
  3. That I am respected as a customer and treated royally. Of course, this is about the products and services I buy and use. It is also about extending to me notice and choice about channel preferences, and possibly subject preferences, and that all data about me is secured.
  4. That I actually expect (and in some cases, demand) that brands actually use data about me to make brand messaging and content more relevant to me. If you collect or track information, please use it—wisely!
  5. That if I’m not yet a customer—that is, if I’m still a prospect—that points 3 and 4 still apply from a prospect’s perspective. I understand points 1 and 2 are about customers, but even here, some elements of prospecting require careful coordination to respect my time.

On a practical level, this “omnichannel” expectation requires brands to remove channel and function silos on the brand-side and walk the talk on customer relationship management, customer-centric marketing, customer experience, lead nurturing and other advertising and marketing processes that reflect today’s brand-customer dialogue.

It also requires that marketers invest in data governance, data quality, data-sharing technology platforms, analytics, preference centers, multivariate testing, employee and partner training and strategies to work toward this omnichannel vision, that is, from this consumer’s perspective.

Suffice to say, multichannel—interacting with customers in multiple channels—is a journey stop to omnichannel. Omnichannel is smart marketing, realized—and very hard work. As a communications professional, I’ll be attending several omnichannel learning venues this Spring to see how brands are trying to make this vision happen.

For those in the New York area:

On April 23: http://www.dmcny.org/event/2013-breakfast-series-3 (Direct Marketing Club of New York)

On May 22: http://www.dmixclub.com/CMS_Files/index.php (Direct Marketing Idea Xchange: This is an invitation-only event for qualified senior-level marketers. Please reach out to me if you would like to be invited.)

On June 10: http://www.imweek.org/ (Direct Marketing Association, in cooperation with eConsultancy)

The Most Powerful Content Marketing Lesson Learned (That Nobody Is Talking About)

In the last few years, of what’s being called online content marketing, what have we learned? When all the blogs, whitepapers, ebooks, podcasts and YouTube videos have been produced, what can we say we learned, took action on and improved? The single most important lesson learned for me, and in my research, has been how engaging customers should never be the goal. Instead, engagement is the starting point. It’s an open door to get customers to respond to you, your brand.

In the last few years, of what’s being called online content marketing, what have we learned? When all the blogs, whitepapers, ebooks, podcasts and YouTube videos have been produced, what can we say we learned, took action on and improved?

The single most important lesson learned for me, and in my research, has been how engaging customers should never be the goal. Instead, engagement is the starting point. It’s an open door to get customers to respond to you, your brand.

Engagement has so many of us so wrapped up that we’re failing to realize a key point: Engaging is merely a chance to enter into a journey with a prospect; a trip toward whatever it is they need, desire, hope for or need to avoid.

Engagement should be (if it’s to be effective) the start of a series of “fair exchanges” that guides prospective buyers toward, or away from, what you’re selling.

If it’s not? You’re just engaging for the sake of engaging. You’re not generating, nurturing and closing leads.

Be Provocative to Generate Response
Most marketers and sellers using blogs, video, YouTube, LinkedIn and such in their online content marketing strategy think of customer engagement as a goal. The finish line. But that’s not going to help you get customers to buy online.

Successfully engaging with customers is an opportunity to generate response from them. Actually selling on social media means being thought provoker-not just a thought leader.

You’ve got to get customers to do something-to begin a journey toward converting to a lead.

Think of it this way:

  • Are you giving customers a reason to talk to you on LinkedIn? A real, compelling reason.
  • Are your blogs so bold they provoke readers to call or email you or sign-up for an offer?

Is whatever you’re doing on social media provoking customers to contact you-so your sales team can help them more clearly understand the thought you just provoked?

Don’t Settle for Engagement
Do you have honestly new knowledge or a new product that can benefit customers in exciting, new ways? Then why would you settle for floating your thoughts out there and hoping to be dubbed a leader?

Does getting your content shared mean that much to you … more than getting leads does?

I realize for some of you the answer will be yes! To those readers I say this: Instead why not give customers a reason to act on the impulse your thoughts can create? This way prospects take action on doing something they really need and want to do … AND create a lead for yourself.

Tempt Prospects to Act
If you watch what I do in my online training business I’m always tempting prospects to trade their contact information for a better way… or tips on avoiding risks.

I’m teasing prospects into taking an action that I know they want to take.

For example, I like to reveal a small part of a hidden opportunity to them on my YouTube videos.

So … you can engage customers and hope that focused conversation gets going or you can cause it directly.

It all starts with realizing engagement is not the goal and knowing how to nurture a lead who isn’t ready to talk about your product or services yet.

So think of engagement as the first step to creating response. If you do you’ll start making social media sell for you more often.

Good luck and see you in comments below! Feel free to disagree with me, share your successes with this technique, etc.

4 Attribution Models in the Age of Big Data

For marketers, attribution is the Holy Grail. For those unfamiliar with the term, attribution means determining what marketing channel or budget was responsible for generating a particular action. Without proper attribution, it’s pretty darn difficult to perform any kind of meaningful ROI calculations on your marketing spend. In fact, I wrote another post about attribution earlier this year or so ago titled “The ‘A’ Word—Learn It, Love It, Live It!,” which pointed out that in today’s marketing world, attribution isn’t always what it’s cracked up to be.

For marketers, attribution is the Holy Grail. For those unfamiliar with the term, attribution means determining what marketing channel or budget was responsible for generating a particular action. Without proper attribution, it’s pretty darn difficult to perform any kind of meaningful ROI calculations on your marketing spend. In fact, I wrote another post about attribution earlier this year or so ago titled “The ‘A’ Word—Learn It, Love It, Live It!,” which pointed out that in today’s marketing world, attribution isn’t always what it’s cracked up to be.

Now it’s no secret that attribution analysis is rather difficult to perform in an age of proliferating media, multichannel customers and, drum roll … Big Data. Think about it, how do you gauge which marketing channel was responsible for generating a sale when a customer was sent and read an email, received a direct mail piece and visited a microsite, Googled the company name and found the homepage, but clicked on a sponsored link leading to a landing page, went to and Liked a Facebook page, became a follower on Twitter, tweeted about it to his friends … and ultimately made a purchase using an App on an iPhone. Which channel gets credit? Email, direct mail, organic SEO, mobile, social? All of them? None of them? Some of them? It’s enough to make your head spin.

Now enter Big Data. In this column, I’ve written extensively about the challenge to marketers posed by Big Data. I know, it’s the meme du jour … seems like you read about it everywhere you go these days. Basically, Big Data is the massive accumulation of information that’s taking place across organizations as they market and engage with their customers and prospects across an ever-expanding proliferation of channels.

As customers and prospects interact with firms across different channels, the data continue to pile up. It’s this deluge of information and how to make sense out of it that is being referred to as Big Data. But, as I’ve written before, Big Data is really the problem—not the solution, per se. The fact that organizations are collecting all of this information is great. It’s what they are doing (or not doing, as you’re about to see) with it that’s most important.

I recently read a study done by the Columbia Business School and the American Marketing Association titled “Marketing ROI in the Era of Big Data.” The study was a survey of 253 corporate marketing decision-makers, director-level and above, at large companies. The results were striking.

They found that 91 percent of senior corporate marketers believe that successful brands use customer data to drive marketing decisions. OK, fair enough … couldn’t agree more. But, among those who are collecting data, a measly 39 percent admit they’re actually unable to turn this information into actionable insight. Pretty surprising, huh?

That’s not all. A whopping 65 percent of marketers admitted that comparing the effectiveness of marketing across different digital media is “a major challenge” for their business. An astounding 57 percent of marketers are not basing their marketing budgets on any ROI analysis whatsoever. And to add insult to injury, 22 percent are using brand awareness as their sole measure to evaluate their marketing spend. That’s right, as their sole measure. A direct marketer by trade, I almost spit out my coffee when I read that last stat.

But the shocking thing is based on my experience, I do not find this to be out of the ordinary. In fact, I met with one client recently and was shocked to learn that the client had basically thrown in the towel when it come to defining attribution, and had created hyper-simplistic ROI analysis by using a control customer group to whom the client didn’t market at all, and compared how much this group bought against the rest. Sounds pretty wonky, right? The crazy part is that even the simplistic model is astronomically better than the 57 percent who don’t even bother with ROI in the first place.

So, what are some solutions to the attribution conundrum? Well, there are several popular models that marketers are experimenting with, and each one of course has its plusses and minuses.

1. First-click attribution—credits the channel where a customer first engaged with the firm. On the plus side, this model actually attempts to discern where the customer journey actually began. The downside is that in today’s environment where marketing is often run in silos, it can be challenging to track customer engagement in a multichannel manner.

2. Last-click attribution—credits the channel where the last action took place (i.e., where the conversion occurred). On the plus side, this model is super easy to track. The downside is that it only measures the channel that’s best at generating the sale itself, and completely disregards how the prospect was initially brought into the fold.

3. Equal-weighting attribution—tracks all of the touchpoints where the customer engaged with the firm, and gives them all equal weight in terms of generating the conversion. The advantage of this model is that it takes a holistic view of the customer-vendor relationship. At the same time, this model overlooks the disproportionate role one channel may play over another.

4. Custom-credit attribution—a hybrid model created by the marketer based on its marketing strategy, customer base, and so on. If done right, a custom model can be highly effective, as it’s designed based on facts on the ground. The only downside is, well, you’ve got to create and test it—which is often easier said than done!

Okay, guess I’m out of room for this post, so I’ll end it here. In any event, I’d love to hear about what if any attribution model you’re been using, how it has worked out, and so on. Let me know in your comments.

— Rio

7 Customer Survey Tips, or How to Know Your Customer For Increased Leads & Profits

Ask any business owner and they’ll tell you, one of the most important rules of thumb is “know thy customer” (KTC). For many years, I’ve found the best way to KTC is implementing periodic customer surveys, then creating a “customer profile” sheet. 

Ask any business owner and they’ll tell you, one of the most important rules of thumb is “know thy customer” (KTC).

Knowing who your customers are—not just on a superficial level, but also on a deeper level—is fundamental for business longevity. It can help your business with most any targeted marketing efforts such as social media marketing (communities with like-minded interests), direct mail and email list selection, copywriting, media buying, affiliate marketing and more. It can also help with bottom-line goals such as bonding, lead generation and sales.

For many years, I’ve found the best way to KTC is implementing periodic customer surveys, then creating a “customer profile” sheet. Ideally, you want to survey at least two times per year, especially after large attrition or list growth.

The profile sheet is important, as it’s a quick reference of your “Joe and Jane” customers, as well as your ideal ‘target’ lead. After all, your prospecting efforts should be a reflection of your current customer base.

But surprisingly enough, not every business knows how to effectively implement and data-mine its online surveys and the respective results.

Here are some quick tips to get the best performance from your customer surveys for business growth and retention:

1. Keep surveys easy and short. The ideal length should be no longer than 10 to 20 questions and questions should be easy to answer. That means thinking of typical questions and having pre-populated multiple choice answers that only need a mouse click.

2. Go 360. Questions should cover demographics, geographics and psychographics. Also, for potential joint venture or advertising opportunities, it’s smart to also ask some competitor and purchase-behavioral type questions.

3. Segmentation is key. Send at least two separate emails to your list. One survey to paying customers and one survey to non-paying customers (leads). It will help later to have these two segments separated when you review response results. If one segment is less responsive than another, you can isolate future “bonding” strategies.

4. Offer incentives. I like to offer free, immediate and easily accessible gifts for survey participation after completion of a survey. Once users submit their last response they are redirected to a download page to free reports or similar. People are taking time out of their schedule and should be “rewarded” accordingly.

5. Be creative with the email subject line. I’ve found that response is greater if the focus of the subject line is more on the reward, rather than the goal. Readers respond better to the mention of freebies and gifts (the “what’s in it for me”), than asking for survey completion. Survey subject lines are viewed as clinical and boring, thus glared over in the inbox.

6. Embrace online tools. Use an easy, cost-effective online survey, such as SurveyMonkey.com. There’s different options and price points, varying on need and robustness. But ideally, you’d want to be able to collect emails and tie responses down to the user (email) level.

7. Allow feedback. Always have an “other” field for open comments. People like to either vent or add praise, so don’t limit them with only having all multiple choice. I tend to make this option the last question.

If you’ve set up your survey correctly where you can drill down responses to the user (email) level, you can then created “buckets” (categories) of common themes. For example, buckets could be based on RFM (recency, frequency or monetary) or on other categories such as interests.

You can then use this information for database marketing efforts and send more personalized messages to your list by group (or “bucket”). This targeted marketing approach has been proven to increase open, click, response and conversion rates by more than double!

Not surveying your list is really doing a disservice. You are not really getting to know your customers; thereby, aren’t offering your best editorial or promotional messages, or creating the best products.

If you’re truly looking for better retention, more customer engagement, and increased sales or leads, then make the time to survey your list.

If you’ve never done this before, then you’re truly leaving money on the table, my friend.

The 4 Pillars of Mobile Strategy

Your brand must have a well-thought-out plan that captures data from all interactions it has with each and every customer so that every customer interaction is contextually relevant. If this element is missing from a brand’s marketing plan, it will be severely limited — customer engagement and profitability will be hampered.

I recently spoke with the team over at Merkle in order to better understand what it takes to successfully embrace mobile marketing. According to Bruce J. Hershey II, mobile marketing strategist at Merkle, brand marketers must identify where their brand stands within the mobile ecosystem before moving on to specific mobile tactics and campaigns. Bruce emphasized that in order to achieve results with mobile marketing, it’s imperative that brand marketers develop and execute against a comprehensive marketing strategy that includes mobile rather than simply focusing on mobile capabilities in isolation. Doing so will allow your brand to stay focused on its overarching marketing strategy as you weave mobile or any other digital channel into the mix.

I asked Bruce what it takes to build a mobile-enabled marketing strategy. “Without a reliable and proven framework to use as a guide, developing and successfully executing a marketing strategy that includes mobile and achieves its desired and expected results can be a difficult thing to achieve,” he replied. According to Bruce, an effective mobile-enabled marketing strategy must account for everything, literally. You must understand the following:

  • your customers, the environment they live in and what they need;
  • your brand, including its objectives, resources, technical capabilities (both with traditional and mobile marketing), experience, and commitment to marketing and mobile at every level within the organization;
  • your existing strategy to meet your brand’s goals and objectives;
  • the technology that will enable your brand to implement that strategy; and
  • the media channels (e.g., print, email, television, radio, social networks, etc.) at your disposal that can be leveraged to reach and engage consumers.

I also spoke with Chris Wayman, vice president and general manager of mobile practice at Merkle. Chris emphasized that in today’s digital age another element to a successful mobile strategy is needed, namely connecting mobile data to your customer database. A CRM strategy helps businesses derive valuable customer insights by looking at all offline and online touchpoints throughout the customer journey.

In other words, your brand must have a well-thought-out plan that captures data from all interactions it has with each and every customer so that every customer interaction is contextually relevant. Chris noted that if this element is missing from a brand’s marketing plan, it will be severely limited — customer engagement and profitability will be hampered.

Merkle has developed a framework to help organizations build out their mobile plan. The framework steps through a process that helps organizations build out their plan along four key pillars:

  1. mobile audit and strategic road map;
  2. media integration of mobile tactics;
  3. mobile marketing tactics; and
  4. customer database integration.

By leveraging these four pillars and a proven approach to developing mobile-enabled marketing strategies, Merkle has found that its clients are able to properly integrate mobile marketing into their digital marketing plan, produce impressive list growth results, reduce uncertainty in the development and execution phases of their marketing plans, and generate predictable results for long-term, sustainable company success.

To learn more about what it takes to develop a mobile-enabled marketing strategy, join us for the following webinar on May 25: How Mobile Coupons Drive Revenue and Build a Mobile Database for Men’s Wearhouse’s K&G Superstore.

Melissa Campanelli’s The View From Here: Two Signs That ‘Traditional’ and ‘Social’ Online Marketing Are Becoming One

Two announcements were made this week that in my eyes signify a true integration of traditional and social marketing.

Two announcements were made this week that in my eyes signify a true integration of traditional and social marketing.

The first was the announcement that Omniture and Facebook have joined forces to provide online marketers with solutions to optimize Facebook as a marketing channel. The partnership builds on the Facebook analytics and Facebook application analytics capabilities Omniture announced last year.

This alliance is designed to help companies integrate Facebook as a marketing channel and connect to relevant conversations with the site’s 400 million active users.

Initially, “the two companies will focus on the most fundamental needs of online marketers today: the ability to automate Facebook media buying and access analytics that measure customer engagement on Facebook,” according to an Omniture press release.

The solution, for example, will enable advertisers to buy media and track media on Facebook through Omniture tools such as SearchCenter Plus. It will also enable them to generate reports designed to understand ad effectiveness of Facebook pages and other Facebook applications.

The two companies will continue to expand their partnership as marketers increasingly use Facebook to optimize visitor acquisition, conversion and retention, Omniture said.

The next announcement came from email marketing provider ExactTarget, which announced this week that it has acquired CoTweet, a web-based collaboration platform that allows companies to manage multiple Twitter accounts from a single dashboard, support multiple editors, track conversations, assign roles and create follow-up tasks.

The acquisition will enable ExactTarget to offer marketers a solution for managing communications across all interactive marketing channels, including social media, email and mobile.

A key reason for the acquisition was because ExactTarget was finding that while “organizations are moving quickly to try to capture the potential of social, they’re also discovering that it’s siloed and not integrated effectively with other forms of digital communications,” said Scott Dorsey, ExactTarget co-founder and chief executive officer, in a press release. “By combining the power of ExactTarget and CoTweet, we can provide businesses with a complete solution to tie together all forms of interactive communications and drive deeper customer engagement online.”

I’ll bet there’ll be more announcements like these to come in 2010, as digital marketing software and service providers really begin to understand the impact social media is having on consumers and marketers alike.

It’s Official: Social Media Marketing Is Here to Stay

Despite some grumblings out there in the blogosphere that social media marketing is a fad, difficult to measure and a waste of time for marketers, a recent study I came across this week says social media will become the focus for many marketers this year.

Despite some grumblings out there in the blogosphere that social media marketing is a fad, difficult to measure and a waste of time for marketers, a recent study I came across this week says social media will become the focus for many marketers this year.

Sixty-six percent of 1,068 marketing professionals surveyed by Alterian recently for its Annual Survey said they’d be investing in social media marketing (SMM) in the next 12 months. Of those investing, 40 percent said they’d be shifting more than a fifth of their traditional direct marketing budgets toward funding their SMM activities.

What’s more, the survey revealed that the majority of respondents (67 percent) feel SMM is either “increasingly important” or “critical to success.”

“2010 marks the start of the digital decade for marketing,” said David Eldridge, Alterian’s CEO, commenting on the results in a press release. “Untargeted and irrelevant marketing techniques are now redundant and the results of this survey show many in the industry recognize this.”

Thirty-six percent of respondents also said they’re investing in SMM and analysis tools this year. In my opinion, this is key: I think this year will be the year marketers finally figure out how to monitor, measure and track their SMM programs and investments. Many marketers consider this the holy grail.

The survey also explored whether organizations integrate marketing technologies across their organizations. Surprisingly, almost half of the respondents (42 percent) said they don’t incorporate clickstream and web analytics data into their customer and email databases.

The research also explored the importance of customer engagement, finding that more than half of respondents (51 percent) are placing a “fair” or “significant” amount of effort on moving from a campaign-centric direct marketing model toward multichannel customer engagement. In fact, only 7 percent are making no effort at all, the survey found.