Updating Your Marketing Database

It’s amazing how quickly things go obsolete these days. For those of us in the business of customer data, times and technologies have changed along with the times. Some has to do with the advent of new technologies; some of it has to do with changing expectations. Let’s take a look at how the landscape has changed and what it means for marketers.

It’s amazing how quickly things go obsolete these days. For those of us in the business of customer data, times and technologies have changed along with the times. Some has to do with the advent of new technologies; some of it has to do with changing expectations. Let’s take a look at how the landscape has changed and what it means for marketers.

For marketing departments, maintaining updating customer data has always been a major headache. One way to update data is by relying on sales team members to make the updates themselves as they go about their jobs. For lack of a better term, let’s call this method internal crowd-sourcing, and there are two reasons why it has its limitations.

The first reason is technology. Typically, customer data is stored in a data hub or data warehouse, which is usually a home-grown and oftentimes proprietary database built using one of many popular database architectures. Customer databases tend to be proprietary because each organization sells different products and services, to different types of firms, and consequently collects different data points. Additionally, customer databases are usually grown organically over many years, and as a result tend to contain disparate information, often collected from different sources during different timeframes, of varying degrees of accuracy.

It’s one thing having data stored in a data warehouse somewhere. It’s quite another altogether to give salespeople access to a portal where the edits can be made—that’s been the real challenge. The database essentially needs to be integrated with or housed in some kind of tool, such as an enterprise resource planning (ERP) software or customer relationship management (CRM) software that gives sales teams some capability to update customer records on the fly with front-end read/write/edit capabilities.

Cloud-based CRM technology (such as SalesForce.com) has grown by leaps and bounds in recent years to fill this gap. Unlike purpose-built customer databases, however, out-of-the-box cloud-based CRM tools are developed for a mass market, and without customizations contain only a limited set of standard data fields plus a finite set of “custom fields.” Without heavy customizations, in other words, data stored in a cloud-based CRM solution only contains a subset of a company’s customer data file, and is typically only used by salespeople and customer service reps. Moreover, data in the CRM is usually not connected to that of other business units like marketing or finance divisions who require a more complete data set to do their job.

The second challenge to internal crowd-sourcing has more to do with the very nature of salespeople themselves. Anyone who has worked in marketing knows firsthand that it’s a monumental challenge to get salespeople to update contact records on a regular basis—or do anything else, for that matter, that doesn’t involve generating revenue or commissions.

Not surprisingly, this gives marketers fits. Good luck sending our effective (and hopefully highly personalized) CRM campaigns if customer records are either out of date or flat out wrong. Anyone who has used Salesforce.com has seen that “Stay in Touch” function, which gives salespeople an easy and relatively painless method for scrubbing contact data by sending out an email to contacts in the database inviting them to “update” their contact details. The main problem with this tool is that it necessitates a correct email address in the first place.

Assuming your salespeople are diligently updating data in the CRM, another issue with this approach is it essentially limits your data updates to whatever the sales team happens to know or glean from each customer. It assumes, in other words, that your people are asking the right questions in the first place. If your salesperson does not ask a customer how many employees they have globally or at a particular location, it won’t get entered into the CRM. Nor, for that matter, will data on recent mergers and acquisitions or financial statements—unless your sales team is extremely inquisitive and is speaking with the right people in your customers’ organizations.

The other way to update customer data is to rely on a third-party data provider to do it for you—to cleanse, correct, append and replace the data on a regular basis. This process usually involves taking the entire database, uploading it to an FTP site somewhere. The database is then grabbed by the third party, who then works their magic on the file—comparing it against a central database that is presumably updated quite regularly—and then returning the file so it can be resubmitted and merged back into the database on the data hub or residing in the CRM.

Because this process involves technology, has a lot of moving parts and involves several steps, it’s generally set up as an automated process and allowed to run on a schedule. Moreover, because the process involves overwriting an entire database (even though it is automated) it requires having IT staff around to supervise the process in a best-case scenario, or jump in if something goes wrong and it blows up completely. Not surprisingly, because we’re dealing with large files, multiple stakeholders and room for technology meltdowns, most marketers tend to shy away from running a batch update more than once per month. Some even run them quarterly. Needless to say, given the current pace of change many feel that’s not frequent enough.

It’s interesting to note that not very long ago, sending database updates quarterly via FTP file dump was seen as state-of-the-art. Not any longer, you see, FTP is soooo 2005. What’s replaced FTP is what we call a “transactional” database update system. Unlike an FTP set-up, which requires physically transferring a file from one server and onto another, transactional data updates rely on an Application Programming Interface, or API, to get the data from one system to another.

For those of you unfamiliar with the term, an API is a pre-established set of rules that different software programs can use to communicate with each other. An apt analogy might be the way a User Interface (UI) facilitates interaction between humans and computers. Using an API, data can be updated in real time, either on a record-by-record basis or in bulk. If a Company A wants to update a record in their CRM with fresh data from Company B, for instance, all they need to do is transmit a unique identifier for the record in question over to Company B, who will then return the updated information to Company A using the API.

Perhaps the best part of the transactional update architecture is that it can be set up to connect with the data pretty much anywhere it resides—in a cloud-based CRM solution or on a purpose built data warehouse sitting in your data center. For those using a cloud-based solution, a huge advantage of this architecture is that once a data provider builds hooks into popular CRM solutions, there are usually no additional costs for integration and transactional updates can be initiated in bulk by the CRM administrator, or on a transaction-by-transaction basis by salespeople themselves. It’s quite literally plug and play.

For those with an on-site data hub, integrating with the transactional data provider is usually pretty straightforward as well, because most APIs not only rely on standard Web technology, but also come equipped with easy-to-follow API keys and instructions. Setting the integration, in other words, can usually be implemented by a small team in a short timeframe and for a surprisingly small budget. And once it’s set up, it will pretty much run on its own. Problem solved.

How to Find the Right Mobile Marketing Vendor

With growing interest in the mobile marketing channel — particularly in the retail, charitable giving and other commerce-related sectors — it’s important to understand how to find the right vendor partner for your brand, campaign or cause. Many companies choose to partner with a vendor who offers licensed mobile marketing technologies. If you choose to go this route, here are the two key questions to consider: One, what type of vendor do you want? And two, how will you qualify your vendor?

With growing interest in the mobile marketing channel — particularly in the retail, charitable giving and other commerce-related sectors — it’s important to understand how to find the right vendor partner for your brand, campaign or cause. Many companies choose to partner with a vendor who offers licensed mobile marketing technologies. If you choose to go this route, here are the two key questions to consider: One, what type of vendor do you want? And two, how will you qualify your vendor?

Question 1: What type of vendor do you want?
Mobile marketing vendors come in all shapes and sizes. Some specialize in particular solutions, while others offer a wide range of capabilities. From application platforms to service providers, vendors may focus on any or many of eight basic pathways to mobile marketing: SMS, MMS, email, voice/IVR, proximity (Bluetooth, WiFi), mobile internet, apps and content.

Think about what type of mobile capabilities you need to create the user experience you’re seeking. Is it couponing, loyalty programs, customer care or something else? What about enabling services, like location or contactless payment? Finally, consider both short- and long-term factors surrounding the longevity of your campaign and future reinventions of it. These factors will certainly play into your decision to work with a multiservice or specialized vendor.

A resourceful place to start your search is the Mobile Marketing Association’s (MMA) online directory of members who offer mobile marketing services. These vendors are certainly up-to-speed on mobile advertising guidelines and consumer best practices. For SMS campaigns, you should also check out the Common Short Codes Administration’s “Partners” page.

Question 2: How will you qualify your vendor?
Whether you’re searching for a full-service vendor or for support to help you build it in-house, be sure to consider the following:

  • Experience. How extensive is the vendor’s mobile experience and relationships within the industry? Ask for current references and review their past campaigns.
  • Industry leadership. Make sure the vendor is a member of MMA, or at least following the industry’s best practices and standards of care. Check if it belongs to related trade associations that are unique to your business. Membership in industry organizations demonstrates that the provider is continually learning and adapting to changes.
  • Expertise. Confirm that the vendor has expertise in your desired platform, along with analytics, strategy, creative and execution. If the provider says it’s an expert in “all of them,” drill down and find out who they work with or who they’ve recently acquired — no one firm can be an expert in everything!
  • Capabilities. Does the provider already have the capabilities to deliver on what you need, or will it have to develop something special for you? If it already has the capabilities, it can show you immediately.
  • Capacity. Consider the scope and reach of your campaign. How many text messages per second/per hour can the platform handle, for example? If you’re a national brand running a national SMS campaign and it’s really successful, you better make sure the platform can handle millions of messages an hour. Ask to see reports that prove it can support your messaging traffic. Beyond total/average volume alone, be sure to ask about peak spikes, meaning the maximum number of messages supported during a specific time.
  • Disaster recovery. Is the vendor prepared for a catastrophe? What will it do if its data center loses power or if a server fails? Ask how quickly it can get back into service. If they’re industry leaders, they’ll have a redundant data center and can be back up in minutes with no loss of data.
  • Pricing. As one of the last criteria considered, keep in mind that you get what you pay for. If you pay a little amount for your platform, don’t expect a lot of service or support.

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