What Does a Data Marketer Look Like?

The currency of nearly all marketing today is data. Ten years ago, we might have said much the same of digital marketing, and all the email, display, social, search, and mobile that’s came forward from it.

The currency of nearly all marketing today is data.

Ten years ago, we might have said much the same of digital marketing, and all the email, display, social, search, and mobile that’s came forward from it.

Twenty years ago, we could have said the same of database marketing and customer relationship management.

And wind back—measurability and accountability, the hallmarks of direct marketing—always have relied on data. We may have called it lists back in the day—but data are what lists have become. The inherent value of data is to know the shared attributes among the data elements and to use that knowledge.

Without a doubt, the “marketing of data” has evolved and transformed as much as marketing itself. Every day in our world, it’s not enough to have contact details on people, or any number of the hundreds of demographic, psychographic, contextual, social and behavioral overlays that may be available, we also need analytics power.

Recent research from The Winterberry Group underscores this point: data is now an $11 billion business in America, and that includes analytics services revenue. I recall an unofficial guestimate of a $2 billion data market back in the early 1990s, when that meant a North American directory of 30,000 plus response and compiled lists available for rental and exchanges.

Next month, the Data Innovators Group will host its annual Data Innovator of the Year Award dinner in New York. This year’s honoree is Auren Hoffman, CEO of LiveRamp (now owned by Acxiom), who says his mission “to connect data to every marketing application.” And so it shall be… Soon.

But who is going to all make it work? Let’s welcome the data marketer and the data scientists and strategists they employ.

Still, too many brands keep customer data in siloes. And while responsibly using offline data with online data is fast coming down the pike, marketing organizations need people in place who can help clients navigate the brave new world of data management platforms, data quality strategies, programmatic media exchanges, big data and small data, and all the algorithms that drive this important “stuff” often in real time. A list sale exists largely no more. Instead data is a pathway to opportunity, a challenge overcome, by way of a data-to-insights-to-strategy recommendation, and a discipline for testing and data quality that leads brands (and their agencies and data marketer partners) to succeed.

It’s more difficult than ever to be a successful data marketer, but our field is producing the partners that businesses, brands and chief marketing officers need. Now if we could just go find a few.

Thank you to the Hudson Valley Direct Marketing Association for enabling my participation at its recent “Meet the Masters” event. Ryan Lake (Lake Group Media), Mark Rickard (Rickard Squared) and Rob Sanchez (Merit Direct) are three CEOs of data marketing organizations who have a few suggestions on where we can all go to look.

6 Thorny Data Problems That Vex B-to-B Marketers, and How to Solve Them

B-to-B marketers are plagued by data problems. Business data is complex and fast-changing. Customers interact with us through a variety of channels, and often provide us with conflicting information. Our legacy databases are not as robust as we need. New tools and technologies emerge and must be evaluated. It’s a never-ending battle. To shed some light on B-to-B data problems, Bernice Grossman and I compiled a working list of problems and solutions. Here are some of the thorniest.

B-to-B marketers are plagued by data problems. Business data is complex and fast-changing. Customers interact with us through a variety of channels, and often provide us with conflicting information. Our legacy databases are not as robust as we need. New tools and technologies emerge and must be evaluated. It’s a never-ending battle. To shed some light on B-to-B data problems, Bernice Grossman and I compiled a working list of problems and solutions. Here are some of the thorniest.

  1. Data entered by our sales people ends up as mush. They don’t follow the rules; or there are no rules. That may be okay for the rep, but it’s not okay for the company.
    Here’s the best practice: Create a centralized data input group. Train and motivate them well. Give them objective rules to follow. Develop a simple method for testing the accuracy from this group as an ongoing practice. If this group cannot follow the rules, then the rules should be re-evaluated.

    Then, develop a very simple process by which reps pass their data to this group. Dedicate particular group members to certain reps, so the input person builds experience about rep’s behavior and communication style. The bonus: these two parties will team, build a valuable relationship, work together well, and improve data quality.

    Consider enabling the data input group with a real-time interface with a database services provider to prompt the standard company name and address. This can be an expensive, but very helpful, tool.


  2. How do I match and de-duplicate customer records effectively?
    Some approaches to consider:
    • Establish—and enforce—data governing rules to improve data entry, which will keep your matching problems under some semblance of control.
    • Find a solid software vendor with a tool specifically designed to parse, cleanse and otherwise do the matching for you. Test a few vendors to find the one that works best with your data.
    • Create a custom matching algorithm. As a place to start, ask several match/merge companies to show you examples of the results of their algorithm against your data.
  3. When data elements conflict in my house file, how do I decide which is the “truth”?
    The short answer is: by date. The most recent data is the one you should default to.

    But also keep in mind when importing data to enhance your records that appended data will always have its limitations, and is best viewed as directional, versus real “truth.” Be careful not to build targeting or segmentation processes that are primarily dependent on appended data.

    You could consider conducting an audit to validate the quality of your various append sources. (This is usually done by telephone, and it’s not cheap.) Then you can add a score to each appended element, based on its source, to manage the risk of relying on any particular element.

  4. Which corporate address should I put in my database? There’s the legal address and the financial (banking) address, which may be different. Or there may be a street address and a P.O. box address. Equifax and D&B often supply the financial address. The address to receive proxies is different from the address to receive advertising mail. How should I sort all this out?
    As a marketer, your concern is delivery. You care about a bill to and a ship to. Focus on the address where mail and packages are delivered.
  5. Measuring the impact of each touch in our omnichannel world is driving us nuts. Any ideas?
    The attribution problem has heated up recently, fueled by the rise of digital marketing. But it’s really nothing new. The traditional attribution methods of assigning the credit have long been either the first touch (the inquiry source medium) or the last touch (the channel through which the lead was either qualified or converted to a sale). Marketers are in general agreement today as to the deficiencies of either of these traditional methods.

    Digital marketers are experimenting with various approaches to the attribution problem, like weighting touches based on stage or role in the buying process, or by the type of touch—attending a two-hour seminar being weighted more heavily than a content download.

  6. How should I handle unstructured data, like social media content. All this “big data” stuff is getting bigger, and meaner, every day.
    User-generated social media content may offer valuable insights into customer needs and issues. But marketers first must think through how they will use the information to drive business results. First you must develop a use case. Then, you must develop a way to attribute the information to a record. For example, one method to allow the match is collecting multiple cookies to find an email address or other identifier. There may be situations where you want to track sentiment without attributing it to a particular customer but to a group, like large companies versus small. In either case, we suggest that you test the value of the data before you put a lot of time and money into capturing it in your marketing database.

You can find more thorny data issues and solutions in our new whitepaper, available for free download. Please submit your issues in the comments section here, and we’ll be happy to suggest some solutions.

A version of this post appeared in Biznology, the digital marketing blog.

8 Recommendations Before Hiring New Digital Direct Marketing Talent

If you’re an employer that recognizes you need new digital direct marketing approaches, you may be apprehensive about hiring new talent. Here is an eight-step plan to install the right digital marketing groundwork before hiring that new employee to make sure you are both successful.

If you’re an employer that recognizes you need new digital direct marketing approaches, you may be apprehensive about hiring new talent. When you hire new people, you risk a cultural misfit between the style and approach of a traditional direct marketer and a digital direct marketer. If it doesn’t work out between the employer and employee after a few months, there is a lot of lose-lose for all parties concerned.

The employer has made a costly mistake with the hire. The employee has possibly given up a good position and relocated. The employer gives up on digital direct marketing, declaring that it’s conceptually not a fit with traditional direct marketing, when it may actually have only been company cultural barriers, skills of the employee, or a lack of commitment to fund digital initiatives by the employer.

Consider, too, that there is the high demand these days for digital talent. Target Marketing’s recent article, 5 Trends in Direct Marketing Job-Hunting and Hiring, by Executive Recruiter Jerry Bernhart, raised excellent points about the state of human resource recruitment for direct marketing companies.

It’s clear, based on Bernhart’s experience, that candidates are getting multiple offers, suggesting that those individuals who are trained in digital marketing, or those who have reinvented themselves, are the folks getting not only offers, but competitive offers with higher pay.

But what if you’re among those “… tens of thousands of companies out there that have little more than a rudimentary Web presence,” referenced in the article? How do you, if you’re faced with the need to reinvent your marketing approaches, recognize the right talent for a new digital direct marketing position and process that’s unproven inside your organization?

Here are eight recommendations, with complete acknowledgement this is a biased perspective coming from my personal experience of having started new departments to lay the groundwork before hiring a new employee.

  1. Retain a Consultant First
    Bring on an independent consultant to work with your organization a few hours or days a week to create your new department, or your new digital direct marketing infrastructure. This individual should be expected to work with you for several months and be made responsible for several initiatives outlined in the following points.
  2. Create a Digital Direct Marketing Plan
    Your consultant should be versed in more than basic websites and email marketing. The plan probably includes development of a content marketing strategy, using multiple cross-channel media, that is designed to bring in leads. Perhaps the role includes the introduction of customer relationship management (CRM) software. The plan might also include acquisition of a marketing automation system that enables sophisticated nurture marketing programs to integrate direct mail, email, personalized microsites, social, mobile, content marketing and more.
  3. Fund It
    You must be ready to invest the money it will require to see results. Be prepared for this transition to take anywhere from six to 12 months of refinement before it’s clear how this can work for you. This can be challenging if your company is seeing slowly declining sales, but the alternative isn’t so rosy. If you wait too long, you won’t need to worry about funding it as your company slowly disappears into non-existence.
  4. Empower
    As a business owner or senior manager, obviously you’re going to want to have input in the digital marketing plan and how your company’s money is invested. But you must accept that to be successful you’ll need to empower people to make decisions on your behalf. Of course, with empowerment comes accountability on the part of the consultant and your staff.
  5. Your Company Culture May Be Stressed
    Chances are that if you’ve brought on a consultant (or fulltime new hire) to make change, your staff will feel threatened. Budget dollars that went to fund existing traditional direct marketing initiatives are likely diverted to new initiatives. That will create anxiety and stress from current long-time staff. And it’s human nature for people to become hostile, passive-aggressive, and even work to discreetly sabotage new efforts.
  6. The Org Chart May Change
    The consultant you contract with should be able to objectively evaluate individual staff’s strengths so they are placed in a role where your current employees come out winners. The organizational chart will probably evolve during this process.
  7. Be Flexible and Agile
    The future belongs to companies that are flexible and agile. If your culture is slow and overly methodical, ask yourself if you’re willing to leave your comfort zone. If not, reread the last sentence in No. 3 above.
  8. Your Plan to Transition From Consultant to Full-Time Staff
    The consultant’s responsibility will be to create a transition plan to hand off the keys to new initiatives and processes that have been created (and proven) for your new fulltime hire. Often, the consultant works with an executive recruiter to identify a replacement, and stays on for a few weeks after the new hire starts to ensure a smooth transition. Sometimes, a consultant is asked to stay on fulltime, but consider that a consultant is most likely energized by “the chase,” so to speak, and will want to move on to help reinvent the next company.

Following these eight steps will set up better odds for a win-win for employer and employee. By the time a new-hire is on board, the organization has had time to absorb and accept cultural change. Assuming the outcome is successful, this process gives confidence to not only the employer, but the new hire and the entire staff. Most importantly, you have broadened your approaches to reach your market through digital channels that are capturing more of their time and attention

4 Predictions for B-to-B Marketing in 2013

It’s that time of the year when observers can’t resist making predictions about developments on the horizon. I hereby take up that tradition, offering up four random prognostications for where B-to-B digital marketing is headed in 2013. My topics include Facebook, content marketing, personal branding and data hygiene—certainly an eclectic mix. I encourage readers to add their own.

It’s that time of the year when observers can’t resist making predictions about developments on the horizon. I hereby take up that tradition, offering up four random prognostications for where B-to-B digital marketing is headed in 2013. My topics include Facebook, content marketing, personal branding and data hygiene—certainly an eclectic mix. I encourage readers to add their own.

Facebook Is Ready, At Last, for the B-to-B Prime Time
It took a while, but Facebook (FB) marketing is now ready for mainstream B-to-B, in support of branding, lead generation and customer relationship marketing goals for enterprises of all sizes. There are several reasons for this—FB’s universality being one of them. But the critical driver is the recent arrival of the Facebook Exchange (FBX) ad platform, which will allow banner ad bidding and retargeting to specific individuals, based on data matching.

So, while I used to argue that Facebook should be at the bottom of a B-to-B marketer’s to-do list, I am revising my view for 2013. Talking to my pals at Edmund Optics, where I serve on the board of directors, I am hearing confirmation of these developments. Edmund’s target audience is optical engineers and others interested in science and technology. Years ago, I would have advised them to ignore FB and focus on more targeted social networks.

But now, EO has turned its Facebook page into an effective environment for engaging these guys, with weekly “Geeky Friday” offers, and the enormously popular Zombie Apocalypse Survival Guide at Halloween, where engineers were invited to design zombie-blasting tools using Edmund products. Facebook is now a top referring source for EO’s website, up 60 percent from last year. I stand corrected.

More and Better Content
B-to-B marketers were early to the content marketing game. In fact, I would argue that B-to-B has been a leading force in this area, in recognition of the importance of prospect education and thought leadership in the complex selling process. B-to-B marketers will continue to excel at creating valuable materials—digital, paper-based, video, you name it—to attract prospects and deepen relationships.

How do I know this? A new study from the Content Marketing Institute and MarketingProfs, which says that 54 percent of B-to-B marketers plan to increase their content marketing budgets in 2013. Their biggest content challenge for next year? Ironically, it’s producing enough content.

Personal Branding as a Way of Life
Business people and consumers alike are realizing that their online personas have a growing impact on both their everyday lives and their professional careers. Rather than letting their personal brands evolve organically, individuals will make more proactive efforts to build and manage their images online, benefiting from the guidance of an emerging community of personal brand experts like William Arruda and Kirsten Dixson. This means establishing unique brand positioning and developing a set of active and consistent messaging across Internet media, especially social networks, to explain who they are and what are their capabilities. Personal branding is no longer just for celebrities or the self-employed; with the rise of social media, it is for everyone.

Renewed Interest in Data Hygiene
Whenever I give a seminar on B-to-B marketing, I ask attendees to take out their business cards and look at them carefully. Then, I say, “Raise your hand if anything on the card is new in the last 12 months.” Invariably, 30 percent of the hands go up.

The high rate of change in B-to-B—whether moving to a different a company, a new title, even a new mail stop—is obvious. But only recently has it begun to sink in that addressing people incorrectly, or campaigning with undeliverable mail or email addresses, not only wastes marketing dollars, but also means lost business opportunity. So enough about big data. The focus in 2013 will be clean data.

And if you want some tips on how to keep your B-to-B data clean, have a look at my white paper: “Our Data is a Mess! How to Clean Up Your Marketing Database.”

So, those are my predictions. I hope readers will add some of their own. What do you think we’ll be seeing in B-to-B digital marketing in 2013?

A version of this post appeared in Biznology, the digital marketing blog.

Dancing Baby Fails and Other Digital Distractions

Why, in the seemingly sophisticated world of digital marketing, are there so many advertising disasters? Who told the marketing director that the first step in digital marketing was to shout and wave your arms to ensure no one misses your message? Or to be vague/coy to drive inquisitive millions to click, just to learn more?

If you own a product or service, how much marketing value is there in having a person stand on a street corner twirling a directional sign trying to point passing motorists towards your company? I suppose if you own a restaurant and are offering a lunch bargain, and it’s between 11:30 and 2 p.m., it might get some attention and customers.

In my book, that marketer gets an A+ for clarity of message (Lunch Special RIGHT HERE!) and the ROI is probably pretty clear too. Give a guy $8 an hour to twirl a $200 sign, and you only need 20 customers to break even.

So why, in the seemingly sophisticated world of digital marketing, are there so many advertising disasters? Who told the marketing director that the first step in digital marketing was to shout and wave your arms to ensure no one misses your message? Or to be vague/coy to drive inquisitive millions to click, just to learn more?

I’m not just talking about that stupid dancing baby—which, by the way, has become so distracting I’ve been forced to place my hand on my monitor to cover it up while I try to read content on a page—or the creepy picture of the woman who ages 50 years in the span of 2 seconds, or the gal who seems to grow and shrink her belly fat instantly. They’re all the equivalent of the guy on the street corner, twirling his sign, but it’s not lunch time and I’m not hungry. And I don’t have the benefit of turning my head away to ignore the distraction, as I’m on a page with content I want.

The worst offenders are those that craft unclear messages that simply leave me saying “Wha–??”

Take the most recent ad presented on my Yahoo! home page: Reliant is not a brand I know, but apparently it’s an NRG Company. (Sorry, still nothing.)

The picture is of a stack of $20 bills and the headline is, “Secure your low price and get $300.” The button says “Switch Today.”

Call me dumb, but I have absolutely no idea what they’re talking about. I’ve never heard of the brand, or the parent company, so I do what I do with most dumb marketing messages: I ignore it. (Well, that’s only partially true; under normal circumstances I would have ignored it, but I wanted to know who Reliant was—or, at a minimum, what NRG meant for this blob—so I clicked the “Switch Today” button.)

After lots of spinning, I got an error message. Hmmm … I tried to Google the company and then click through to their web site. A lot more spinning. Another error message. I start to panic. Did I just download a virus that’s now wreaking havoc on my desktop?

After switching browsers, I finally got to the Reliant website. It turns out they’re an energy company—but none of their links work. So I don’t even know if they service my area. Dumb and dumber.

Digital marketing isn’t brain surgery, but only a few have figured it out. Take ING Direct, for example. In the same pixel space as Reliant, the ING headline reads, “Turn on the Power of Checking and get a $50 bonus” with 3 bulleted benefits and a big, orange “Learn More” button. Yup. Got it. There’s cash for me for opening an account, no fees, 35K fee-free ATMs and I can make deposits from anywhere, anytime. Count me in!

Next time you’re crafting a digital ad, put yourself in the reader’s shoes. You don’t need gimmicks to get attention. You need a benefit-laden headline. You need a visual that supports your message. You need to make sure your link works. And K.I.S.S.: Keep It Simple Stupid.

Wanted: Data-Driven, Digital CMOs

There was a time, not so long ago, that the firm’s CMO basically acted as the chief brand steward, running a marketing department that focused on maintaining brand equity and making sure the company was sending out the right message to the masses. Data and analytics? They were usually scoffed at … That was the purview of the down-and-dirty world of the direct marketer, right? Direct marketers were the ones who obsessed over response rates, cost per order, lifetime value and so on.

There was a time, not so long ago, that the firm’s CMO basically acted as the chief brand steward, running a marketing department that focused on maintaining brand equity and making sure the company was sending out the right message to the masses. Data and analytics? They were usually scoffed at … That was the purview of the down-and-dirty world of the direct marketer, right? Direct marketers were the ones who obsessed over response rates, cost per order, lifetime value and so on.

Well, suffice it to say that those days are over—marketing in today’s multichannel environment is about much more than just cute creatives and killer copy. Today’s marketing is increasingly digital and data-centric. A recent article appearing in Ad Age explained that “real-time data-driven decisions, enabled by technology, have made the marketer’s job much more measureable and accountable.” Interestingly, the same article also points out that the average tenure of a CMO is a meager 28 months. No coincidence.

What it boils down to is that today’s CMO is expected, de rigueur, to be a pro when it comes to all things digital. We have two important trends to thank for this fact. The first one of these trends is the general transition to digital. Look, it’s no secret that over the past few years there’s been an incredible shift of marketing spend from traditional over to digital media. It’s the scale and speed of this transition that’s so breathtaking.

According to a June 2012 survey by RSW/U.S., 44 percent of marketers report that they are now spending at least half of their budgets on social and digital media. This represents a 42 percent increase from 2009 alone! And this is not the end of the process. I think it’s safe to say now that the proverbial tipping point has been reached—this trend will only accelerate in coming years.

Anyone who’s worked in the digital marketing arena knows that success in the space all really boils down to data: Impressions, clicks, conversions, opens—this is the vocabulary of the digital world. Well, guess what? Today’s CMO needs to have a deep understanding of these terms, what they mean and how the underlying technologies work—at least on a high level—and be generally comfortable playing in the digital space. Think about it: without a significant digital background, how on Earth can a CMO possibly be expected to run a marketing machine where at least half of the marketing dollars are being spent in the digital space? Not happening.

The other major trend is the inexorable fragmentation of the IT infrastructure within enterprise firms. Basically, what’s happening is that because technology has evolved radically over the past 10 years, it’s giving different stakeholders at companies the ability to purchase and use technology outside of their organization’s firewall, and often without IT’s involvement. Very often, in fact, IT is even without IT’s knowledge!

This is huge shift. Just a few short years ago, mind you, software was what you ran on your computer or on the company mainframe, and it was pretty much always purchased and managed by IT. Well, those days are most definitely over. What’s happened is that the emergence of the SaaS/Cloud model of software delivery has turned that world on its head.

Today, any marketer with a credit card can sign up for, say, a CRM tool or a marketing automation tool and be off to the races in seconds flat. Ask any marketer and they’ll explain how this has been a huge boon to their departments, liberating them forever from the clutches of IT.

Now, of course, a big reason for this excitement is the oftentimes frosty relationship between marketing and IT. Personality types side, in its essence this rocky relationship actually has a lot to do with conflicting mandates. It’s the IT department’s mandate to act as the stewards of the firm’s information and technology infrastructure. Essentially, it’s their job to keep internal systems running and make sure they’re secure. That’s about it. No, it’s not their job to build you a new landing page, or set up a new email campaign for this fall’s reactivation campaign.

Today’s marketing department, on the other hand, is much more focused on operations than anything else. Today marketing is about creating, testing and launching numerous marketing campaigns across various channels using different tools, and evaluating their performance using real-time analytics. And running an operationally focused marketing team requires the ability to build, dispatch and analyze lots of campaigns in rapid succession. Until recently, this heaped loads of pressure on the IT folks, who groaned under the strain. So you can see why marketers have cheered and embraced the emergence of Web-based SaaS marketing tools.

Okay, I got a little sidetracked there, so I’ll get back to the central point, which is that because marketing is rapidly becoming the de facto owners of their own IT infrastructure, this mean that they now control the technology itself and the data contained therein. It’s a big responsibility, requiring marketers to manage and safeguard this vital corporate infrastructure and information, taking on the dual roles of chief marketing technologist and data steward. But with this responsibility comes great power—to use these awesome tools and information to really, truly understand who customers and prospects are, and send out highly personalized and effective marketing campaigns with demonstrable ROI.

But evaluating performance in this environment means not only using new marketing tools and digging through mountains of data. Just as importantly, it also means understanding what it all means. In other words, just because you’re a CMO does not mean you don’t need to know how many opt-ins you have in your company database, or how many fans on Facebook.

And guess what? It’s hard to be comfortable with digital if you’ve never played in the space. But how many CMOs are also digital pros? Not too many. So not surprisingly, firms are finding that it’s incredibly difficult to find leaders with the hard-to-find combination of senior management leadership and digital marketing experience. Given this reality, it’s not too surprising to discover that many companies are running through CMOs in a conveyor belt-like fashion.

Do you know any data-driven digital pros with senior marketing leadership experience?? If so, bet your bottom dollar these executives will be cashing in big time in coming years.

—Rio

The Future of DM: It’s Interactive

Earlier this week, the Direct Marketing Association released a qualitative report on the future of direct marketing, concluding that it will most certainly be interactive.

More on how the report was put together in a moment. Bottom line: Customers will be in control, analytics will rule and digital marketing will increase.

Earlier this week, the Direct Marketing Association released a qualitative report on the future of direct marketing, concluding that it will most certainly be interactive.

More on how the report was put together in a moment. Bottom line: Customers will be in control, analytics will rule and digital marketing will increase.

The DMA asked more than 35 well-respected direct marketing leaders — including copywriting maven and columnist Herschell Gordon Lewis of Lewis Enterprises, Alan Moss of Google, Jeanniey Mullen of Zinio, and Akira Oka of Direct Marketing Japan — their opinions on the future of direct marketing and their industries/segments. The report provides insight into what these leaders think about the short- and long-term future of direct marketing.

Specifically, they were asked the following questions:
* Where do you think direct marketing will be in five years? Ten years?
* How should direct marketers prepare for these changes?
* How will your industry/segment change during this time?
* How is the state of our nation’s economy impacting your industry/segment?
* How do you think the election of Barack Obama will affect the direct marketing community?

The report revealed the following about the future of direct marketing in the next five to 10 years:

Customers will be in control. Technology has given consumers myriad choices, options and resources that let them find what they want and skip over what they don’t. Technology also will continue to advance, opening up great opportunities for both consumers and marketers.

Measurable and accountable marketing will increase. The health of the economy has made marketers think and rethink about where to put each dollar of their marketing budgets, according to the report. As a result, allocations will move away from traditional channels such as catalog and direct mail into digital channels, which are intrinsically more measurable.

Traditional DM will decrease; digital marketing will increase. Environmental pressures, postal rate hikes and the potential for a do-not-mail bill will result in a decrease in both direct mail and catalog volume. Digital has many advantages over traditional DM, such as its ability to track real-time measurements; create more targeted, relevant and personalized messages; and reach new generations of consumers who were born with a mouse in hand.

Many channels, one message. It’s not all bad news for direct mail and catalogs, though. Integration always has been a key component to direct marketing and will only increase in importance as the number of viable channels increases, the report says. There also will be a movement from single channel campaigns to more integrated, multichannel strategies. These campaigns have the same message across multiple channels, allowing marketers to reach more customers, who have more opportunities to respond via the channel of their choice.

While the death of direct mail will not come in 2009 — or any time in the near future — interactive marketing clearly is growing in importance. If you’re not participating in any interactive marketing programs now, it’s time you start. Your future depends on it.

Olympics Advertisers Fail to Go for the Gold

During the 2008 Olympics, advertisers in both the U.S. and U.K. largely failed to use paid search marketing to promote themselves online after their national teams’ won gold medals.

This bold statement came to me from Steak, a digital marketing and search agency headquartered in New York and London.

Between them, the U.S. and U.K. won 55 gold medals at the 2008 Olympic Games, finishing second and fourth, respectively, in that category behind leader China.

During the 2008 Olympics, advertisers in both the U.S. and U.K. largely failed to use paid search marketing to promote themselves online after their national teams’ won gold medals.

This bold statement came to me from Steak, a digital marketing and search agency headquartered in New York and London.

Between them, the U.S. and U.K. won 55 gold medals at the 2008 Olympic Games, finishing second and fourth, respectively, in that category behind leader China.

In the release, Steak said “analysis of search traffic showed significant spikes in interest in athletes following their gold medal win, signaling an opportunity for sponsors, news organizations and other advertisers to connect with interested consumers.

But Steak’s research shows that few seized the opportunity to use paid search to capitalize on a positive association with the Olympic stars. Search ads showed up against just 35 percent of the U.S. and U.K. gold medal winners’ names. Among others, advertisers who sponsor medalists in particular missed out on some of the highest-profile moments, Steak said.

Steak noted that search interest in U.S. swimmer Michael Phelps, who won a record eight gold medals, skyrocketed between Aug. 10 and Aug. 17, according to its analysis of Google Trends data.

Steak’s research also shows that Phelps’ corporate sponsors, such as Speedo and PureSport performance drinks, started running paid search ads against the swimmer after well after he gained his eight medal.

Similarly, Kerri Walsh and Misty May-Treanor, the popular winners of the women’s beach volleyball gold medal, failed to generate much interest from advertisers. Neither their sponsors nor the AVP or FIVB beach volleyball tours, in which both athletes compete, capitalized on their respective Olympic successes, according to Steak.
Food for thought…