Where Do You Start? Teaching Direct Marketing to College Students

What’s the best approach to engage college kids in understanding direct marketing? Principles first; metrics second? Or Metrics first; principles second?

What’s the best approach to engage college kids in understanding direct marketing? Principles first; metrics second? Or Metrics first; principles second?

I remember sitting in the parlor of a Catholic parish rectory in North Jersey while my wife was participating in a wedding rehearsal. The Mets game was on TV. The brother of a parish priest who was visiting from Ireland asked me to explain baseball. Explain baseball?!?! Where do you start?

Despite all of the professional speaking and training I’ve done in direct response marketing, the first time I taught a college course devoted entirely to it was last spring. I started with the fundamental concepts of media, offer, and creative. I had them write about each of these concepts from their own experience. We went over the various targeting opportunities marketers have online and offline. And at the end, we covered measurement and metrics.

At the end of the course, I asked the students to tell me what worked, what didn’t, and what should be changed. The most insightful comment was from a student who said:

“I wish you had covered all that measurement content at the beginning of the course. It made me realize why all that other stuff was important, and how it fit into the big picture.”

HELP!

Now, as I embark on teaching a course dedicated to Direct Response Marketing at Rutgers School of Business Camden, I’m looking for advice about how to sequence things.

Last year, when I bemoaned the lack of an appropriate up-to-date textbook for this discipline in this column, Dave Marold and Harvey  Markowitz stepped up and recommended the Fourth Edition of “Direct, Digital, and Data-Driven Marketing,” by Lisa Spiller. (Thanks for that Dave and Harvey; I’m using that book in the Fall).

What Do You Think?

Now I see the benefit of stressing measurement early. Even though I told the students every class that the coolest thing about direct marketing is that you can measure it, apparently the mechanical reality of measuring something like search engine keywords was not real for them. So:

  • Do I incorporate some form of measurement into every lesson?
  • Do I introduce a comprehensive measurement unit early in the course? (Spiller’s book does that early on, in Chapter 4).
  • Or, do I go full-on “math course” at the beginning, and thin a 40-student class down to 20 students after two weeks? (Just kidding).

Opinions welcome. (Actually, encouraged.)

Direct Marketing Agency Triumphs Over ‘Mad Men’

“Wonder Who?” was not an unusual “Mad Men” reaction in 1960s when direct marketing agency Wunderman, Ricotta & Kline, already at the top of the direct mail and mail order agency league table, might be mentioned in a social or business conversation. “What do they do?” was the usual semi-curious follow-up, if there was one.

“Wonder Who?” was not an unusual “Mad Men” reaction in 1960s when direct marketing agency Wunderman, Ricotta & Kline, already at the top of the direct mail and mail order agency league table, might be mentioned in a social or business conversation. “What do they do?” was the usual semi-curious follow-up, if there was one.

In the sacred haunts of ad men (there were precious few women, but more on that later), the direct and data-driven marketing discipline just didn’t have the sex appeal that came with real advertising; especially real advertising that could be seen on television and bragged about over cocktails. It was an exciting world, where 30 seconds of peer-acclaimed, but unaccountable, genius had far more value than judgments based on the measurable and accountable return on marketing investment.

That we now live in a very different world could not be better illustrated than by the recent announcement that WPP has folded 150-year-old J. Walter Thompson, the citadel of “brand” advertising, into Wunderman, described by Adweek as “the first direct marketing agency” and “the darling of WPP.” The result will be Wunderman Thompson, with 20,000 people across 90 markets.

Wrote Avi Dean in Forbes: 

“This comes a couple of months after digital agency VML merged with traditional agency Y&R to form VMLY&R. While these are positioned as mergers of equals, they are essentially a takeover by the digital agencies of their older siblings.

“JWT’s demise is a metaphor of the demise of Madison Avenue.”

The ironies are too numerous to mention.

There must, incidentally, have been a compelling reason for the WPP management’s recent pairing of VML with Y&R to form VMLY&R. Could it have been that folding Y&R into Wunderman after Wunderman had been previously folded into Y&R might have been too much even for the traditional “Mad Men” to stomach?

The “demise of Madison Avenue” can be traced directly to the cultural clash between traditional agencies and their owners who looked down their noses at “mail order” and what became data-driven direct marketing. From the earliest days of the agency, its founder, Lester Wunderman, while optimistic, maintained a healthy skepticism about whether the chasm between these two cultures could truly be breached, given the opportunistic motivation driving most “mergers” of the disciplines.

In the early 1970s, when general agencies realized they needed to be seen to embrace direct marketing, Wunderman was acquired by Young & Rubicam. The embrace, however, spun to clients and the marketing world, was less driven by passion and an honest and sensitive understanding of the changes that were impacting the market than giving clients some comfort if, God forbid, they wanted some DM advice or service. There was — and to a lesser extent, still is — a historical incompatibility of two cultural systems.

The traditionalists mostly considered DM practitioners, if not second-class citizens, not to be the folk you would want to bring to a top client meeting — unless you had to. For those of us who experienced the “had to,” how the “essential” half-hour direct marketing portion of the big client presentation got reduced to 15 minutes and then to five (if there was still time before the client left to catch his plane), however demeaning, made our subsidiary status perfectly clear.

When Wunderman proclaimed that “Data is an expense. Knowledge is a bargain,” most of the traditional advertising world nodded their heads but didn’t quite get the “knowledge” part, or see how it would impact the future of every aspect of marketing. Writing about this future in the last chapter of his 1996 book, “Being Direct: Making Advertising Pay,” Wunderman said:

“The way of creating effective combinations of price and service is by creating knowledge-based direct channels between manufacturers and consumers, in which the media becomes the marketplace. The Industrial Revolution created the practice of branding, but in the Information Age, brand images increasingly provide only a thin shield against competition.”

The ever-expanding “knowledge” of the consumer and the market, made possible by the handling of data and of the accountable value of every advertising spend, are the forces that have propelled CMOs, as described by Avi Dean, to “care less about agency labels than ever before. They care about effectiveness and results.” So it’s hardly surprising that what we might call the “accountable” culture — making advertising pay — has overtaken the “image” culture. Or so it seems.

Because direct marketing had long been “down-market,” to quote an oft-used phrase, it attracted a disproportionate number of very talented women — many of whom knew they would never make it in the testosterone-dominated “advertising business.” Ironically, that’s all changed, as well, and two women have been appointed as “Chairman” (Chairperson? Chairwoman?) and CEO of Wunderman Thomson.

Some veterans of this culture war still insist that “brand” and “accountability” are, if not incompatible, not happily married, either. They mourn the loss of JWT and fear for the clients.

Quoted in the UK’s Campaign, Rosalind Gravatt, former director of communications, Lloyds Banking Group, said:

“I believe that the JWT brand name could have evolved and still has huge cachet (particularly among blue chip clients) in a way that the Wunderman name never will.”

Lindsey Clay, CEO of Thinkbox, was more emotional:

“It feels to me like someone I care about has died … I just hope that the brand guardianship and culture-defining creativity, which were central to the JWT ethos, live on beyond the name.

The loyalty to JWT is admirable, but the premise that brands will lose cachet and suffer when tainted by the Wunderman name and/or accountability, is a remnant of another age.

“Wonder Who?” is a question that isn’t asked anymore. What goes around comes around.

[Author’s Note: As the founder and first CEO of Wunderman Worldwide, the international arm of the original Wunderman company, and after the Y&R merger, the Wunderman member of the Y&R International Board, I’ve been privileged to have had a unique, if slightly prejudiced, view of the changes described above.]

Why Direct Mail Is the Rodney Dangerfield of Media

If you’re in control of marketing and you’ve ignored the direct mail channel — you may be making a mistake. And yet, like the famed Energizer Bunny, the mail channel keeps performing. For most of our clients, their direct mail program reliably brings in more leads than any other single channel. By a lot.

If you’re in control of marketing and you’ve ignored the direct mail channel — you may be making a mistake. Easy to dismiss, for its role as a dinosaur — direct mail is the Rodney Dangerfield of media. I’ll admit that’s an almost extinct reference — but the comedian’s famous “I don’t get respect” act truly fits here. Great direct mail campaigns lead to big time sales — which — ultimately yield respect. Years ago, after starting a career in advertising, I fell in love with direct mail for the oh-so gratifying value of measurement. Now with so many options for measurable media, that tangible benefit is no longer limited to the mail.

Somewhere along the line though, gradually people began to doubt the power of the direct mail channel. Smart people. For well over a decade we have had doubters question and condescend about the dinosaur that is mail.

It’s easy to see why. After all, do people really read their mail anymore? And the cost per impression is high.

Get ready to be surprised.

And yet, like the famed Energizer Bunny, the mail channel keeps performing. For most of our clients, their direct mail program reliably brings in more leads than any other single channel. By a lot. In all of our Medicare Marketing work, the direct mail reliably drives more members and responses than any other channel. The list goes on.

There was a time that no one thought using offline media to drive online results made sense. Think again.

In fact I’d say, the best way to think about direct mail is as a sales channel. You can identify your target universe and work back from the point of sale to determine the metrics. A true cohesion among sales and marketing teams.

It’s not old news. And it’s not the only news. The really exciting part is that your mail performance can and will be enhanced by other channels

Here are some rules for determining how and when to use direct mail as part of your marketing mix:

  1. Do the math — Whether it be on the back-of-a-napkin, or via a comprehensive pro-forma spreadsheet, finding out in advance whether you can afford the cost of a direct mail lead is the best first step. At our agency, our teams are trained in direct mail math – those basics are “job one”!
  2. Start with a test — If you walk around the office showing people your mail, I can already tell you how that will go. Pretty much no one will like what could turn out to be the best performing direct mail package. Nothing beats the value of “in-market” testing.
  3. Feature an offer — An offer is something that goes above and beyond the product features. While an offer is not mandatory, it really helps.
  4. Hire an agency — This is a deceivingly detailed business. Any agency that has been in business for a number of years (with a specialty of direct mail) has faced problems. Lots of obstacles big and small that you’d rather avoid. But, beyond the value of smooth-sailing, you’ll likely get a better performing piece from a group that lives and breathes direct mail best practices. I promise it will be more than worth it.
  5. Hire a proofer — See No. 4. This is an area where you’d rather not make a mistake. It’s expensive.

Experienced direct response (and also sales) professionals honor the channel that is direct, because it’s proven itself as a valued part of the plan.

Once it works for you, you too will find yourself committed to the mail. Even if, like me, you never check your own mailbox!

Direct Marketing ‘Discovered,’ at Last

After years of being the poor relative to brand advertising, our direct discipline has finally been discovered by the big brand purveyors — all of those Mad Men who traditionally looked down their noses at any marketing efforts that demanded some form of response and were driven more by results than ego-polishing.

Perhaps we should all now breathe a welcome sigh of relief.

After years of being the poor relative to brand advertising, our direct discipline has finally been discovered by the big brand purveyors — all of those Mad Men who traditionally looked down their noses at any marketing efforts that demanded some form of response and were driven more by results than ego-polishing.

MediaPost’s’ editor Joe Mandese recently wrote an article with the intriguing, if slightly confusing title, “Excuse Me For Being Direct, But So Will You.”

“The most disruptive challenge to conventional media-based, brand-building advertising happened during the earliest days of Internet advertising, when agencies and brand marketers failed to define emerging digital platforms like the Internet — and ultimately, mobile — as a branding medium.

“Instead, direct-response marketers embraced the medium because of its real-time immediacy, access to data to track and ability to modify conversions and sales on-the-fly, and pure ROI efficiency.

“According to some experts, that trend is about to accelerate — as conventional brand marketers throw in the towel altogether and begin leveraging digital media to become direct sellers themselves.”

Conventional brand marketers throwing in the towel … becoming direct sellers themselves: That’s big news for those of us who have spent the better part of our careers trying to explain to those brand giants (and capturing some of all that money they seem to throw around) that while metrics like ‘reach’ and ‘frequency’ certainly have their value, nothing beats affordably capturing the business of new and returning customers and knowing their ROMI, the return on the marketing investment in each one of them. It is surprising they didn’t discover it years ago.

That expression “branding medium” suggests that those marketing initiatives which include a call to action and urge the consumer to “act now” do little or nothing to enhance the brand and often drive general agency art directors berserk, because those calls to action get in the way of their elegant designs.

Some years ago, before there was any significant “subscription” advertising in Brazil, where I now live, the small group who controlled newsstand distribution forbid publishers from advertising for subscriptions on pain of having their publications banned from the newsstands. They reasoned that this advertising would lure magazine buyers away. But when presented with the indisputable fact that offering subscriptions would allow a much greater advertising spend and in the best of all possible worlds, only 5 to 7 percent of the people who saw an ad would reply, while the rest would be positively exposed to the brand and many would purchase at the newsstand, they gave the publishers the go-ahead. Brand and subscription have gone hand-in-hand ever since, to their mutual benefit.

Quoting Publicis Groupe Chief Growth Officer, Rishad Tobaccowala on the reason for the “direct” discovery, Mandese wrote:

“… conventional brand-building media models aren’t working as well as they used to. It’s because big brands are realizing that the only way to have a relationship with and understand their consumers, is to cut out the middlemen and have a relationship with them directly.”

Wow! That’s a quantum leap from the historic paradigm that “direc”’ was, if not a strategy of last resort, well down the list of priorities. Working in big general agencies, how many of us have been asked to prepare 30-minute presentations to be an integral part of the same pitch with the agency’s brand campaign, only to see the time for it reduced to 20 and then 10 minutes or even — as time ran out — being asked to mention the “direct” recommendation while taking the client to the elevator?

Two important factors have principally changed the game:

  1. The emergence of vast amounts of data, the machines to process it and the ability of marketers to creatively use this data for their marketing initiatives;
  2. The growing understanding of CRM, the essential proactive relationship between brand and known customer.

Of course this hasn’t happened overnight. Data-driven marketing gurus have been planting and nourishing these seeds for decades and, as a result, the industry has grown and grown. Lester Wunderman said famously: “Data is an expense. Knowledge is a bargain.” As knowledge has grown and become more widely accessible, brand marketers are being increasingly drawn to it.

Poor relatives no more, “direct” practitioners have finally been “discovered” and have emerged from the shadows.

It feels great in the sunlight.

Direct, Data-driven Marketing Increase Brand Equity

I may be a ripe heretical candidate to be barbecued at the stake by my more conservative direct marketing colleagues, but I’ve come to the conclusion that communications which enhance brand equity should be accounted for as such, and that this value must be part of and added to the data-driven marketing equation.

Opening Keynote - Dinosaurs & Cowboys: Direct Marketing Secrets Every Marketer Needs To Know Whether You Are Selling Online, Offline or Both
Direct marketing may be an older technique, but it’s relevant and adds to brand equity
Check out even more about personalization and artificial intelligence with FUSE Enterprise.

Back when direct marketing was a tribal affair and its warriors and their acolytes were constantly on the field of battle against the trendy “mad men,” it was a heresy to even consider that any marketing action that didn’t have a measurable call to action was anything but pure waste. The image purveyors had a monopoly on all of the glamor and all of the money. And they could laugh off that eternal question attributed to Lord Leverhulme: “I know half of my advertising expenditure is being wasted, but no one can tell me which half.”

Long before we had computers to churn all of the numbers, our DM tribe boasted that we could exactly determine whether the advertiser was getting his money’s worth by dividing the total advertising expenditure in each medium, or even each specific ad, by the number of measurable sales generated. When a campaign was running, the first place to stop when one got to the office in the morning was the mailroom, because that’s where the orders were.

Until the last decade of the 20th century, the concept of valuing “brand equity” didn’t exist. If you owned Coca Cola or Nescafe, what the brand was ‘worth’ was measured almost totally by the sales and profits generated in the marketplace. In 2006, “The Journal of Consumer Marketing” published an important academic article, “Measuring Customer‐Based Brand Equity” which made a compelling argument that “brand equity positively influences financial performance.” Even the most hidebound direct marketing professionals had to recognize this reality, even if they found it convenient to ignore it in their own work.
Recently, working on a project to present the results of a broad multi-media campaign to a company with the recommendation that it be expanded, one of the factors arguing for that expansion was an analysis of the return on the marketing investment (ROMI). The combined press media and digital campaign invited the reader/viewer to an attractive homepage, which both told the advertiser’s story and offered the next step in the journey — registration to receive a free series of ‘content’ publications and videos.

Peter's media response analytsis
(Note: In Brazil, where this article was written, in the templates, commas denote decimal points and ‘.’denote the commas used to separate thousands.)

Using the standard media response template, it was easy enough to put costs against each of the site visitors and registrants. For the advertiser’s $60,000, he received 5,300 visitors; and of these, 2,060 people registered to receive the additional content. Although it had been established by the client that the lifetime value of a purchaser would average $250.00, because there was no direct sale of the product (although one could have been promoted with an incentive coupon, etc.), the problem was how to show the advertiser what he had gotten for his money.

To value the campaign, we had to start with the concept that only a percentage of the registrants would be “buyers.” So we built a simple “sensitivities” table, ranging possible conversion percentages Peter's blog post chartand established the sum of all of the costs that would be necessary to effect the conversion, had the client wished to promote a direct conversion. Looking at the number of likely sales from the sensitivities table, even being conservative and saying that only 40 percent or 824 would become buyers, the cost per sale at $54.88 would be acceptable: a lower cost would be better.
There is an old saying that: “The heresy of one age becomes the orthodoxy of the next.” If it were a direct marketing heresy in the past to ascribe any value to the frequency a consumer came in contact with a brand message if this could not be traced to a measurable sale, perhaps we ought to revisit this and, in our new digital age, this might be transformed into orthodoxy. That said, how can we reasonably and fairly determine the added brand value: What price should we put on each head?

Another Peter blog post chart

Economics teaches that the value of something is what a willing buyer is prepared to pay for it. If the willing buyer is prepared to pay $5 per thousand to send out email messages, then is it really a heresy to say that these communications have a positive value in conveying the brand message — adding to the brand equity — to the analytically selected audience? Note that in the campaign results summary above, we have valued the 20 million brand impressions at $60,000, almost the entire amount the advertiser paid for the campaign. Adding this to the hypothetical $206,000 of revenue earned from sales means that the ROMI is 3.9 times.

I may be a ripe heretical candidate to be barbecued at the stake by my more conservative direct marketing colleagues, but I’ve come to the conclusion that communications which enhance brand equity should be accounted for as such, and that this value must be part of and added to the data-driven marketing equation.

Learn even more about the convergence of technology and branded content at the FUSE Enterprise summit. Artificial intelligence and personalization will be featured among many other techniques and technologies.

5 Data-Driven Marketing Catalysts for 2016 Growth

The new year tends to bring renewal, the promise of doing something new, better and smarter. I get a lot of calls looking for ideas and strategies to help improve the focus and performance of marketers’ plans and businesses. What most organizations are looking for is one or more actionable catalysts in their business.

The new year tends to bring renewal and the promise of doing something new, better and smarter. I get a lot of calls looking for ideas and strategies to help improve the focus and performance of marketers’ plans and businesses. What most organizations are looking for is one or more actionable marketing catalysts in their business.

To help you accelerate your thinking, here is a list of those catalysts that have something for everyone, some of which can be great food for thought as you tighten up plans. This year, you will do well if you resolve to do the following five things:

  • Build a Scalable Prospect Database Program. Achieving scale in your business is perhaps the greatest challenge we face as marketers. Those who achieve scale on their watch are the most sought-after marketing pros in their industries — because customer acquisition is far from cheap and competition grows more fiercely as the customer grows more demanding and promiscuous. A scientifically designed “Prospect Database Program” is one of the most effective ways great direct marketers can achieve scale — though not all prospecting databases and solutions are created equally.

A great prospecting database program requires creating a statistical advantage in targeting individuals who don’t already know your brand, or don’t already buy your brand. That advantage is critical if the program is to become cost-effective. Marketers who have engaged in structured prospecting know how challenging it is.

A prospect database program uses data about your very best existing customers: What they bought, when, how much and at what frequency. And it connects that transaction data to oceans of other data about those individuals. That data is then used to test which variables are, in fact, more predictive. They will come back in three categories: Those you might have “guessed” or “known,” those you guessed but proved less predictive than you might have thought, and those that are simply not predictive for your customer.

Repeated culling of that target is done through various statistical methods. What we’re left with is a target where we can begin to predict what the range of response looks like before we start. As the marketer, you can be more aggressive or conservative in the final target definition and have a good sense as to how well it will convert prospects in the target to new customers. This has a powerful effect on your ability to intelligently invest in customer acquisition, and is very effective — when done well — at achieving scale.

  • Methodically ID Your VIPs — and VVIPs to Distinguish Your ‘Gold’ Customers. It doesn’t matter what business you are in. Every business has “Gold” Customers — a surprisingly small percentage of customers that generate up to 80 percent of your revenue and profit.

With a smarter marketing database, you can easily identify these customers who are so crucial to your business. Once you have them, you can develop programs to retain and delight them. Here’s the “trick” though — don’t just personalize the website and emails to them. Don’t give them a nominally better offer. Instead, invest resources that you simply cannot afford to spend on all of your customers. When the level of investment in this special group begins to raise an eyebrow, you know for certain you are distinguishing that group, and wedding them to your brand.

Higher profits come from leveraging this target to retain the best customers, and motivating higher potential customers who aren’t “Gold” Customers yet to move up to higher “status” levels. A smart marketing database can make this actionable. One strategy we use is not only IDing the VIPs, but the VVIP’s (very, very important customers). Think about it, how would you feel being told you’re a “VVIP” by a brand that matters to you? You are now special to the brand — and customers who feel special tend not to shop with many other brands — a phenomenon also known as loyalty. So if you’d like more revenues from more loyal customers, resolve to use your data to ID which customers are worth investing in a more loyal relationship.

  • Target Customers Based on Their Next Most Likely Purchase. What if you knew when your customer was most likely to buy again? To determine the next most likely purchase, an analytics-optimized database is used to determine when customers in each segment usually buy and how often.

Once we have that purchase pattern calculated, we can ID customers who are not buying when the others who have acted (bought) similarly are buying. It is worth noting, there is a more strategic opportunity here to focus on these customers; as when they “miss” a purchase, this is usually because they are spending with a competitor. “Next Most Likely Purchase” models help you to target that spending before it’s “too late.”

The approach requires building a model that is statistically validated and then tested. Once that’s done, we have a capability that is consistently very powerful.

  • Target Customers Based on Their Next Most Likely Product or Category. We can determine the product a customer is most likely to buy “next.” An analytics-ready marketing database (not the same as a CRM or IT warehouse/database) is used to zero-in on the customers who bought a specific product or, more often, in a specific category or subcategory, by segment.

Similar to the “Next Most Likely Purchase” models, these models are used to find “gaps” in what was bought, as like-consumers tend to behave similarly when viewed in large enough numbers. When there is one of these gaps, it’s often because they bought the product from a competitor, or found an acceptable substitute — trading either up or down. When you target based upon what they are likely to buy at the right time, you can materially increase conversion across all consumers in your database.

  • Develop or Improve Your Customer Segmentation. Smart direct marketing database software is required to store all of the information and be able to support queries and actions that it will take to improve segmentation.

This is an important point, as databases tend to be purpose-specific. That is, a CRM database might be well-suited for individual communications and maintaining notes and histories about individual customers, but it’s probably not designed to perform the kind of queries required, or structure your data to do statistical target definition that is needed in effectively acquiring large numbers of new customers.

Successful segmentation must be done in a manner that helps you both understand your existing customers and their behaviors, lifestyles and most basic make up — and be able to help you acquire net-new customers, at scale. Success, of course, comes from creating useful segments, and developing customer marketing strategies for each segment.

5 Direct Mail Messaging Tips

Direct mail marketing has many areas of focus, so sometimes not enough time is spent on messaging. Too many times marketers are quick to try something while not thinking it all the way through. Just as the designer took time to lay out the art, you need to take time to lay out the message.

Direct mail marketing has many areas of focus, so sometimes not enough time is spent on messaging. Too many times marketers are quick to try something while not thinking it all the way through. Just as the designer took time to lay out the art, you need to take time to lay out the message. Thoroughly vetting WHAT you say and HOW you say it, is essential. In order to have your direct mail messaging be effective there are some things you should consider.

Here are five tips for better direct mail messages:

  1. Not Too Wordy: The easiest way to get your mail piece thrown in the trash is to put too many words on it. Think of ways to convey your message using less words. Bullets, color text, bolding and italics can all help to highlight the most important words. The KISS (keep it simple stupid) method is best.
  2. Repeat the Message: The more times a recipient sees the same message the better it is remembered. They are then more likely to respond. Another benefit of repeating the message is that the more often they hear or see it, the more they trust the message.
  3. Focused Theme: In direct mail it is very important to coordinate your message, your artwork, your design and your audience together to form your theme. When any of these is out of alignment it detracts from your message, confuses the recipient and your direct mail ends up in the trash.
  4. Rhyme: People enjoy rhyme. It’s easy to remember and fun to read. When your message rhymes it resonates more with recipients. Have some fun with your messaging. The best part about rhyme is that you can subliminally coax people with your message.
  5. Brand: Your brand is how people identify you. If your message conflicts with your brand people will not believe it. They will not trust your message and may even get angry about it. Take the time to craft your message to your brand.

Think about the last direct mail piece you received and really looked at. What about that messaging was intriguing for you? Usually you can pin point a few key words that stuck out to you. Using that information, how can you tailor your message to do the same thing? What words will grab attention and stand out to them?

All the words you place on the mail piece need to work together toward your goal. Is your goal for them to visit your website? Come to your store? Call you? Or something else? When you have a clearly defined goal it makes it easier to craft your message. Not every mailing will have the same goal, so make sure that when you carry messaging over from other campaigns that you carefully edit it to fit your new goal.

Remember that recycling the message from previous campaigns is good for recognition, so you want to do it. Just make sure that when you do, you are integrating it into the new campaign well. Some wording will need to change and you may need to highlight different key words. Crafting your messaging can be really fun, so take some time and get inspired to be creative.