Flash (Sale) AAAHHH!!

Part of me feels like, since I revealed my obsession with song lyrics in my first entry, I can’t keep using it anymore—like that old magician’s rule. But oh well, I found myself way too amusing when I came up with this title so I’m going to get past that.

Part of me feels like, since I revealed my obsession with song lyrics in my first entry, I can’t keep using it anymore—like that old magician’s rule. But oh well, I found myself way too amused when I came up with this title so I’m going to get past that.

Today I’ve got just a quick A/B test result from a (wait for it … you’ll be shocked …) flash sale (gasp!) I did this past summer for our Direct Marketing IQ Bookstore.

We wanted to offer a 24-hour flash sale on some of our popular titles, but the question was how to get the most out of the offer. Would we get a better response by offering a discount on specific titles, or would it work better to simply toss out the discount code and give recipients free reign on what to use it for?

When in doubt, hit the split. We created two very similar HTML promotions, both promoting the flash sale for the same 24-hour period. We gave both the same subject line: “24-HOUR FLASH SALE—The countdown is on!” And of course, each version was deployed at the same time.

Email A offered the discount for three specific titles belonging to the same Boosting Direct Mail Response series. Email B gave a code which could be used on any title in the store produced by Direct Marketing IQ. The coupon codes themselves were slightly different for easy tracking of which email had prompted the purchase.

Any guesses as to which would be the bigger hit?

Get your guesses in now …

Drumroll, please …

  • Email A’s click rate was 1.2 percent; Email B’s was 0.7 percent.
  • Email A earned more than double the number of items sold than Email B.
  • Those sales amounted to Email A bringing in a grand total of $380.77 more than Email B over the 24 hour period.

So, there you have it. Based on these results, folks are much more likely to act immediately on a sale if the options are narrowed down and laid out for them plainly. It’s a test I’d like to try a few more times, but the difference in numbers was pretty significant this time around.

Look for future posts talking wedding emails, memes in email marketing, more fun with subject lines, or whatever else happens to poke me in the side along the way.

Emails That Target Customer Behavior Without Using Big Data

The ever increasing volumes of data used by companies like Target, Walmart and Amazon to carefully target their customers is cumbersome and difficult to manage. Analyzing patterns to find the right trigger that will motivate an individual to buy requires gifted statisticians that combine art and science into marketing magic. But what if you are not quite ready to use big data in your business? Can you still reap some of the benefits?

The ever increasing volumes of data used by companies like Target, Walmart and Amazon to carefully target their customers is cumbersome and difficult to manage. Analyzing patterns to find the right trigger that will motivate an individual to buy requires gifted statisticians that combine art and science into marketing magic. But what if you are not quite ready to use big data in your business? Can you still reap some of the benefits?

Fortunately for companies that don’t have a team of statisticians standing by, customer behavior and activity can be used to increase sales without the challenges that come with big data. It’s as simple as watching for specific activity or changes in customer behavior and being prepared with a customized response to encourage people to buy.

If this is your first venture into customer behavior marketing, start with the people who are the easiest to identify. Seasonal and discount shoppers are relatively easy to recognize because they have very specific buying patterns. Creating customized marketing for them increases their response and reduces costs. The dual benefits make this a logical place to begin.

Seasonal shoppers are the people who purchase items at specific times of the year. Traditional RFM (recency, frequency, monetary value) analytics flag them as top buyers shortly after a purchase and then systematically move them down the value chain. When they place the next order, they move back to the top and flow down again. Creating a marketing plan that sends materials when they are most likely to buy reduces marketing costs without affecting sales.

Discount shoppers only buy when there is a sale. This segment can be further divided into subsets based on how much discount is required to get the sale. If the marketing is properly tailored, this group of people serves as inventory liquidators. Minimizing the non-sale direct mail pieces they receive and heavily promoting sales increases revenue while reducing costs.

Both groups respond well to promotional emails. Capturing email addresses should be standard operating procedure. It is especially critical for seasonal and discount shoppers because they tend to be more impulsive than other segments. The emails that remind seasonal shoppers that it is that time again and tell discount buyers about the current sales are economical and effective.

The next step after targeting shopper segments is adding specific product category information based on the individual’s shopping history. When my daughter was younger, my shopping behavior with American Girl included two orders per year for regular priced items and sale purchases in between. The two full price orders were placed just before Christmas and her birthday. Sale purchases were impulse driven and triggered by emails announcing clearance items.

Bitty Baby was the category of choice in the early years of buying from American Girl. The shift to the character dolls didn’t happen until my daughter was nine. She received her first Bitty Baby at two. During nine years of systematic purchases, no one recognized that I only ordered certain things at specific times. How much would your company save if your marketing was tailored to customer purchasing patterns?

What about targeting people who haven’t purchased from a specific category?

The ability to predict what people want before they know it is one of the advantages of analyzing trends and activity in big data. Before moving to that level, start with the information that shoppers are providing. This trigger email from Amazon was sent two weeks after I searched for soda can tops on their site without purchasing.

The email avoids the creepy factor by saying, “are you looking for something in our Kitchen Utensils & Gadgets department? If so, you might be interested in these items.” Instead of, “because we noticed that you spent 14.34 minutes searching for soda can tops you may be interested in the ones below.”

The best practices included in this email are:

  • It doesn’t share how they know that the shopper is interested in a specific category or item.
  • The timing from the original search to email generation is long enough to allow time to purchase, but not so long the search is forgotten.
  • It makes accessing the items easy by providing multiple links.
  • The branding is obvious with links to my account, deals and departments.

Targeting customer behavior can become very complicated very quickly. Starting simple with specific segments and activity allows you to test and build on the lessons learned. The return on investment is quick and may surprise you.

Introducing ‘The Integrated Email’ Blog by Debra Ellis

Why is email marketing so effective? Is it the one-to-one communication, ability to connect with customers and prospects on the go, or the provision of instant gratification with one-click shopping? The answer depends on the company and the customer relationship, but there is one universal truth: The combination of interactive communication with self-service solutions makes email the most versatile tool in a marketing workshop.

Why is email marketing so effective? Is it the one-to-one communication, ability to connect with customers and prospects on the go, or the provision of instant gratification with one-click shopping? The answer depends on the company and the customer relationship, but there is one universal truth: The combination of interactive communication with self-service solutions makes email the most versatile tool in a marketing workshop.

My experience with email marketing began shortly after Hotmail launched the first Web-based email service in 1996. A client had compiled approximately 11,000 customer email addresses and wondered what we could do with them. Our first test was a 25 percent discount on any order placed that day. A text-only message was sent using the mail merge functionality in Excel and Outlook. It took over two hours to send all the emails.

Those two hours were quite exciting. We had two computers in close proximity so we could watch the progress of the outgoing emails and monitor sales on the website. Within minutes of starting the email transmissions, orders started flowing in. By the end of the day, more than 1900 orders were received. A handful of people asked to be excluded from future mailings. Over 200 people responded with personal notes. Some were grateful for the discount. Others apologized for not placing an order and asked to receive more emails.

Things are much different today. The novelty of receiving a personalized message from a company is long gone. Spam filters make getting emails delivered a near impossible mission. And the competition for recipients’ attention is at an all-time high. Even so, email marketing remains one of most effective marketing and service vehicles available.

The emails that deliver the best return on investment are the ones that are integrated with the other marketing channels to provide information and service to the recipients. They create a connection between company and customer that motivates people to respond. A successful email marketing strategy builds loyalty while increasing sales.

Many email campaigns today are little more than a systematic generation of one promotional email after another. Discount emails are relatively easy to create and deliver sales with each send, making them a quick way to inject some life into lagging sales. The simplicity of sale marketing combined with solid response rates creates an environment where marketers are reluctant to move beyond the easy, low-hanging fruit.

In addition to generating sales, discount marketing also trains people to always look for the best price before buying the company’s products and services. It is not a sustainable strategy because there will always be another company that can offer lower prices and lure customers away. A better plan is to develop an integrated email marketing strategy that educates and encourages people to develop a relationship with the company. This requires more effort, but it delivers loyalty and long-term results.

Every email that a customer or prospect receives is an opportunity for the company to establish itself as the best service provider and solidify the relationship. Best practices include:

  • Using a valid return email address so the recipient can respond with one click.
  • Sending branded emails that identify your company at first glance.
  • Mixing educational emails that provide “how to” information for products and services with new product launches and promotional messages.
  • Transactional emails that communicate shipping information and challenges so customers aren’t left wondering, “Where is my order?”
  • Highly targeted and personalized emails designed to engage customers and prospects at every point in their lifespan.

Finding the right combination of educational, event and promotional emails requires testing and measuring results for incremental improvements. The resources invested improve relationships, increase sales and create a sustainable marketing strategy.

Note: Over the next few months, we’ll feature winning and losing email marketing strategies and campaigns on this blog. If you would like to share your company’s killer emails, send them to Debra at dellis@wilsonellisconsulting.com.