WWTT? Yeti+ Launches for Earth Day, Offers Unique ‘Streaming’ Content

This past Wednesday was the 50th anniversary of Earth Day. Despite dealing with a pandemic and quarantines, a number of brands put out campaigns to celebrate the environment, including Yeti’s launch of Yeti+.

This past Wednesday, April 22, was the 50th anniversary of Earth Day. Despite dealing with a pandemic and quarantines, a number of brands put out campaigns to celebrate the environment, but the Earth Day campaign that caught my eye the most was from Yeti.

The Austin-based brand, known for its outdoor lifestyle products, created Yeti+, along the same vein as Apple+ or Disney+. But unlike those streaming video subscriptions, Yeti+ is free (though available for only a limited time), and has some pretty great content to watch, especially during these super stressful times.

Yeti offers Yeti+ streaming service to celebrate Earth Day
Credit: Yeti

What sort of goodies can you watch? Some fun nature documentaries? Action-packed outdoor events? Nope. You can watch streams be streamed.

The site copy reads:

We’ll be back outside before we know it. Until then, kick back, grab a cold one, and wet your appetite for the wild with one of our streams.

Click on any of the options, the video goes full screen, and you’re treated to the calming serenity of simply watching a stream — literally a body of water (each one runs about 10 minutes). If you’ve ever been to a holiday party where someone puts on a festive Yule Log video, then you get the picture.

But where the holiday Yule Log videos are often more about kitschy ambiance, I think the video offerings of Yeti+ are not only clever, but honestly, good relevant content.

They’re soothing. They’re beautiful. They take us out of our homes and transport us to a place of calm. Maybe to a place we’ve never been before. And though many of us may still be able to go outside and exercise while maintaining our stay at home rules, not everyone lives someplace this beautiful, green, and lush. Or is even physically able to go outside at all, for whatever reason.

Yeti+’s website copy may be a little tongue-in-cheek, but I think their Earth Day campaign offers a much-needed escape from the harshness of this world. And in my opinion, every little bit helps. We talk about how important it is to offer value to our customers and prospects. Well, I think Yeti+ nailed it.

What do you think, marketers? Leave me a comment below!

Who’s Winning Halloween?

We got our first Christmas card this week! That’s crazy. They’re skipping the best holiday: Halloween! Fortunately, not everyone is skipping the year’s most fun holiday. In fact, candy and costumes are flying off the shelves. HookLogic has released a report on the leading costumes and candies of the spooking season.

We got our first Christmas card this week! That’s crazy. They’re skipping the best holiday: Halloween!

Santa on HalloweenFortunately, not everyone is skipping the year’s most fun holiday. In fact, candy and costumes are flying off the shelves. HookLogic, a New York-based performance marketing platform, is tuned in to the research folks are doing for the national masquerade. Aggregating data from U.S. consumer searches and retailers like WalMart, Target, PeaPod and Fresh Direct, HookLogic has released a report on the leading costumes and candies of the spooking season.

Costumes: Halloween of the Mouse

Halloween is the season of monsters, right? Werewolves, vampires, ghosts, slasher film stars? Zombies! Zombies are huge, still, right? I can’t open Facebook without seeing The Walking Dead all over the place.

Not anymore! Here are the Top 10 costumes searches being done in 2016.

  1. Disney
  2. Spiderman
  3. Deadpool
  4. Descendents
  5. Light Saber
  6. Cinderella
  7. Ariel
  8. The Flash
  9. Stormtrooper
  10. firefighter/fireman

When you consider that Marvel and Star Wars are also owned by Disney, that entire list belongs to The House of Mouse except The Flash (DC, owned by Warner Bros.) and the fireman at the bottom.

Disney Fire Department
9 out of 10 ain’t bad.

I didn’t realize just how complete Disney’s pop culture domination had become until I saw that list. It’s hard to escape the fact that Disney is winning at the box office, but now they’ve got Halloween too.That’s a strong brand.

Candy: The Sweet Tradition

Unlike costumes, the list of leading candies doesn’t look much different than the stuff I used to get when I went trick or treating as a greedy teenager.

  1. M & M
  2. Hershey
  3. Reeses
  4. Skittles
  5. Snickers
  6. Ghirardelli
  7. Twizzlers
  8. Lindt
  9. Kisses
  10. Twix
  11. Dum Dums
  12. Orbit
  13. Nerds
  14. Pez
  15. Lifesavers
  16. Airheads
  17. Trident
  18. Smarties
  19. Altoids
  20. Brookside
  21. Pocky
  22. Cadbury
  23. Haribo
  24. Sixlets
  25. Werthers
  26. Toblerone
  27. Payday
  28. Brachs
  29. Warheads
  30. Milka
  31. Mars
  32. Wonka
  33. Rolos
  34. Kitkat
  35. Trolli
  36. Lindor
  37. Whoppers
  38. Crunch
  39. Ferrero
  40. Sweetarts

Next year, I fully expect Disney to launch its own line of confectionery.

Takeaways

What does this mean to us as marketers?

  • Disney’s winning everything; monsters are no match for family entertainment.
  • People want to wear what’s hot, but eat the old faves.
  • And for the love of Jack O’ Lantern, let Santa sleep till Thanksgiving.

New Ways of Thinking About Marketing in 2016

What are you to your customers? A vendor? A catalog? A funny commercial mascot? For many brands today, there’s a chance to be so much more. The key is in how you think of what you are to them.

What are you to your customers? A vendor? A catalog? A funny commercial mascot? There’s a school of thought that says that’s all you should be; that customers will say “I don’t want a relationship with my cough drops, I just want them to fix my cough.”

GrumpyCatParadigmFor many brands, new ways of thinking about marketing offer the chance to be much more. With today’s tools (social media, websites, apps, etc.), your brand has the chance not just to sell products and services, but to entertain your target market, help them make friends, or even reach their goals. The key is in how you think of what you are to your customers.

Here are four new ways of thinking about your marketing that could open a whole new world of customer connection. I’ll go into one in depth, and hit the others briefly. If you’re interested, let me know in the comments and we’ll explore them in more detail.

The Undiscovered Country
The biggest difference between online media and offline is space. Your marketing content is not constrained by air time, page counts or the budgets to get them. When a new prospect finds your company, your entire online presence is a vast new space to explore. Give them something to discover!

The Undiscovered Country is really about content, and it works best when your products or services have interesting nuances and details to talk about and stories to tell, because your goal is to get the audience to spend a lot of time exploring it. Content marketing does a lot of great things, but usually we focus on it as a way to improve SEO, or to generate leads. Here you’re using content as a way to earn prospect and customer mindshare and become an online destination.

By creating a deep content destination with articles, videos and other content that defines your space, you give fans a place to come and hang out. A place to spend time thinking about the hobby, job or task your products are used in. You become like Disney: The first brand that comes to mind and one that’s associated with entertainment and good times.

In the B-to-B space, you can see this done well by the marketing automation companies like HubSpot and Marketo. They educated marketers about lead generation, nurturing and the other marketing tactics their tools enabled through extensive blogs, downloads, webinars, studies and other content. Those things gave their audience new ideas, and exploring those ideas paid off by making that audience better at their jobs. And all of it promised there’d be more to discover if they bought into the products.

In the consumer space, think of what Red Bull does with its content marketing, completely owning certain areas of extreme sports and providing hours of discoverable, bingeable content on Red Bull TV. Or what Maybeline does with makeup tips. Or what Home Depot does with home improvement project ideas.

People spend an unbelievable amount of time looking at content online, they might as well be looking at that content with you.

What Are Some Other Ways of Thinking?
I’ve seen marketers using other strategies that I think qualify as “new ways of thinking.” And I’d be very interested to hear of ones you’ve spotted, too.

One I’ll call The Tribe is when companies use social media and the reach of online marketing to create branded communities (on their own websites, as well as on the relevant social networks) where their prospects and customers can meet like-minded individuals and discuss things related to that market. Like The Undiscovered Country, the goal is to become a destination for your target audience and earn mindshare. But it’s access to like minded individuals that brings them and keep them coming back. This works well when your product is in a niche with strong enthusiasts, especially if they’re geographically dispersed. The social sharing enabled by companies like Nike, which uses online tracking to allow runners to connect and compare their achievements, is a good example.

When I look at companies like Salesforce, or Apple when Steve Jobs was alive, I really see them leveraging what i would call The Movement. They’re not just selling a product, they’re selling a new way of approaching the world and getting adopters to evangelize it to other users. They hold huge events to build devoted fanbases that really believe (perhaps correctly, I don’t mean to be cynical about any brand using these tactics) that they’re using better tools in better ways than everyone else. Unlike The Tribe, The Movement uses live events and spaces (conventions, Apple Stores) to bring followers together to celebrate The Movement, its new products, and to have a good time with like-minded individuals. It’s a powerful tactic, and you can probably think of someone in your life who’s been swept up in one.

Finally, it’s not hard to look at what a company like Tom’s Shoes is doing and see The Mission. The Mission is about taking the focus off of the transnational aspect of your relationship with customers, and proving to them that by doing business with you they’re making the world a better place. Tom’s famously donates a pair of shoes to children for each one you buy. Jessica Alba’s Honest Company isn’t giving anything away, but they are spearheading a movement to have open, honest, simple ingredients in cleaning and beauty products people use. You could look at what Ben & Jerry’s has done for years as an example of exactly this kind of strategy (not all of these ways of thinking grew on the Internet). All of them put the focus on selling their mission, and sell products almost as an afterthought.

Take a look around at the companies that grab your attention and the potential they may or may not be cashing in on. What are some other ways of thinking to add to this list?