What Did You Do on Data Privacy Day 2020? Do Tell Us.

Each year, Jan. 28 is known as “Data Privacy Day” in the United States and globally — also Data Protection Day in other jurisdictions. As business organizations — and marketers — we see that it’s a day when consumers are reminded to exercise their “privacy rights.”

Each year, Jan. 28 is known as “Data Privacy Day” in the United States and globally — also Data Protection Day in other jurisdictions.

As business organizations — and marketers — we see that it’s a day when consumers are reminded to exercise their “privacy rights” and take advantage of tips and tricks for safeguarding their privacy and security. In our world of marketing, there are quite a few self-regulatory and co-regulatory tools (U.S. focus here) that enable choices and opt-outs:

  • To opt out of commercial email, direct mail, and telemarketing in certain states, consumers can avail themselves of DMAchoice. For telemarketing, they can also enroll on the Federal Trade Commission’s Do Not Call database.
  • For data collected online for interest-based ads, consumers can take advantage of Digital Advertising Alliance’s WebChoices and Network Advertising Initiative consumer control tools, which are accessible via the ubiquitous “AdChoices” icon. DAA also offers AppChoices, where data is collected across apps for interest-based ads. [Disclosure: DAA is a client.]
  • Now that California has a new consumer privacy law, consumers there can also take advantage of DAA’s new “Do-Not-Sell My Personal Information” Opt Out Tool for the Web. Its AppChoices mobile app also has a new CCPA opt-out component for “do not sell.” Publishers all over the Web are placing “Do Not Sell My Personal Information” notices in their footers, even if others outside California can see them, and offering links to their own in-house suppression lists, as well as DAA’s. Some publishers are using new the Privacy Rights icon to accompany these notices.

Certainly, businesses need to be using all of these tools — either as participants, or as subscribers — for the media channels where they collect, analyze, and use personal and anonymized data for targeted marketing. There’s no reason for not participating in these industry initiatives to honor consumer’s opt-out choices, unless we wish to invite more prescriptive laws and regulations.

We are constantly reminded that consumers demand high privacy and high security — and they do. We also are reminded that they prefer personalized experiences, relevant messaging, and wish to be recognized as customers as they go from device to device, and across the media landscape. Sometimes, these objectives may seem to be in conflict … but they really are not. Both objectives are good business sense.

As The Winterberry’s Group Bruce Biegel reported while presenting his Annual Outlook for media in 2020 (opens as a PDF), the U.S. data marketplace remains alive and well. For data providers, the onus is to show where consumer permissions are properly sourced, and transparency is fully authenticated and demonstrated to consumers in the data-gathering process. It’s a rush to quality. Plainly stated, adherence to industry data codes and principles (DAA, NAI, Interactive Advertising Bureau, Association of National Advertisers, among others) are table stakes. Going above and beyond laws and ethics codes are business decisions that may provide a competitive edge.

So what did I do on Data Privacy Day 2020? You’re reading it!  Share with me any efforts you may have taken on that day in the “public” comments below.

‘Every Door Direct’ Not for Every Mailbox

For approximately the past year, the U.S. Postal Service has offered an innovative program called “Every Door Direct” that is designed to convince more small businesses to use direct mail for household geo-targeting. I love it. While social and mobile are all the rage—so, too, is “local”—and direct mail marketing, among other channels, is a powerhouse for local advertising. Mail pieces may be addressed to “Our Neighbors at Fill-in-the-Address”—as are some of the offers I receive from larger mailers—but “Every Door Direct” mail is relevant to me since, for the most part, they represent businesses close to home, in the neighborhood where I do 90 percent of my shopping.

For approximately the past year, the U.S. Postal Service has offered an innovative program called “Every Door Direct” that is designed to convince more small businesses to use direct mail for household geo-targeting.

I love it. While social and mobile are all the rage—so, too, is “local”—and direct mail marketing, among other channels, is a powerhouse for local advertising. Mail pieces may be addressed to “Our Neighbors at Fill-in-the-Address”—as are some of the offers I receive from larger mailers—but “Every Door Direct” mail is relevant to me since, for the most part, they represent businesses close to home, in the neighborhood where I do 90 percent of my shopping. Thus, I receive it, I read it, and I make an informed decision what to do with the information. (And my take-out menu drawer is filling up.)

Now, that’s my opinion.

Some people don’t want to receive direct mail at home. These individuals may turn to the Direct Marketing Association’s long-standing and free consumer service DMAchoice (formerly the Mail Preference Service) to indicate a preference not to receive direct mail offers from companies and organizations. Consumers, by using DMAchoice, can choose to turn off most all their direct mail at once (some of us call this the “nuclear” option), or by mail category (credit card offers, catalogs, magazine offers, for example), or by single companies and organizations by name. It really works well.

From the marketers’ perspective, DMAchoice saves money—mail is not sent to those persons who have chosen not to receive it. DMAchoice also provides mailers with a “resident/occupant” suppression option when using the all-categories opt-out portion of the file. By subscribing to DMAchoice (which is available to both DMA members and non-members) and its resident/occupant suppress option, mailers can prevent in advance resident/occupant mail from being sent to any consumer who has signed up for the off-all-lists option. To implement the resident/occupant mail suppression, DMAchoice relies on letter carriers, according to their route, to actually handle the non-delivery so each consumer’s choice can be honored. (Typically, the letter carrier has a printed list of suppressed addresses along the daily route which tells the carrier which addresses to skip delivery of the resident/occupant mail piece.)

National mailers who use resident/occupant mail (also known as Saturation Mail) have been using this suppression capability for years. Now the Postal Service is using Every Door Direct to make it easy for local businesses to “one-stop” shop and distribute direct mail pieces by local geography. Except there’s one important component now missing from this “one stop”—honoring previously expressed consumer choices to not receive mail.

A solution is on its way for local mailers who use this USPS program.

Discussions are underway that would enable DMAchoice to be accessed and used by local printers who support Every Door Direct across the country. Thus, these printers, who apply an address on each Every Door Direct mail piece on behalf of the local advertiser, could use DMAchoice to honor consumer choice to opt out at an address-specific level before the printing even takes place, or to provide the “do not deliver” request to the local post office. It may take some time to work through all the details of how this will be executed, but the commitment is there, wisely, to honor consumer choice.

Certainly, the Postal Service is very much aware of how important it is to honor “do not mail” preferences of consumers. It’s good for advertisers, too. (By the way, 2012 marks the 41st anniversary of DMA’s consumer suppression file.) I only wish Every Door Direct had been designed to have available name suppression such as DMAchoice applied up front. Just because it’s easy to toss a direct mail piece in the trash or recycling bin, doesn’t mean “every door” of Every Door Direct should be delivered. That will be remedied shortly.