Marketing EDGE ‘Rising Stars’ — a Beacon for All Generations

For nearly half a century, Marketing EDGE has been helping to develop the next generation of marketing leaders … and as we prepare to turn 50 in 2016, we’re ready to soar! There’s one thing that has remained consistent throughout the history of this organization: Our mission and purpose! We educate, develop, grow and employ college students in our field.

In this week’s post, I have invited Marketing EDGE President Terri L. Bartlett to comment on last month’s 2015 “Rising Star” honorees (Twitter: @mktgEDGEorg #2015RisingStars). What impressed me most in honoring these young professionals in our field is how they teach me much about our business, and that learning about marketing happens in many directions – we are all teachers and students. Disclosure: Marketing EDGE is one of my clients and a cause I proudly support. I’m hopeful many of this blog readers support this organization, too — Chet

For nearly half a century, Marketing EDGE has been helping to develop the next generation of marketing leaders … and as we prepare to turn 50 in 2016, we’re ready to soar!

There’s one thing that has remained consistent throughout the history of this organization: Our mission and purpose! We educate, develop, grow and employ college students in our field.

As we prepare for this landmark year, we are launching a new campaign – “Find Your EDGE” – that leverages the great work we have done, and more importantly, the work ahead … as we continue to develop programs that bridge the gap between academic theory and the practical knowledge and skills required in the workplace … all with the promise that we will bring you the best, brightest, market-ready talent for your corporate needs. Here’s a video to tell the story: Find Your EDGE Video

This message was the perfect backdrop to introduce the outstanding Young Professionals and Corporation honored during the Marketing EDGE 2015 Rising Stars Awards Dinner in New York on June 9 — where more than 370 marketing professionals gathered to pay tribute to the evening’s honorees:

2015 Rising Stars Honorees

  • Louis Cohen, SVP, Digital Marketing & Head of Search, Affiliate Marketing & Lead Generation, Citi Cards
  • Amina Dilawari, Director, Marketing Strategy & Planning, ALSAC/St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital
  • Jessica Hawthorne-Castro, Chairman and CEO, Hawthorne Direct
  • Lisa Radding, Director of Research and Product Development, Ethnic Technologies
  • Andrea Steele, Manager, Omnichannel Capabilities, Unilever

2015 Corporate Commitment Honoree:

  • Return Path, with Matt Blumberg, CEO, accepting the award.

Hosted by marketing guru Dave Scott, also a Marketing EDGE Trustee (and our very own comedienne), the dinner and award presentation gave us all a unique snapshot on each individual’s career path, marketing prowess, motivations, and passion for mentoring, teaching and giving back … plus interests and hobbies, creating a better understanding of the authenticity of each individual honored.

From a brief look of our social media that evening – #2015RisingStars – one can see how fulfilling and fun a June night in New York City can be … all for a very important cause: our future as marketing practitioners, and ensuring the next generation of marketing leaders.

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Mish Fletcher, OgilvyOne Worldwide @mishfletcher (representing the evening’s lead sponsor)

 

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Andrea Steele, Unilever (one of the honorees) @ADerricks :

 

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Lisa Skilroff, Multicultural Marketing Resources, @Multiculural50 :

 

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For a great array of photos from the evening, visit our site: Marketing EDGE, Facebook and Instagram, too.

As you will see, the industry gathering demonstrates how those in our industry come together to support the mission of Marketing EDGE … for that and so much more, we say thank you for joining us as we transform our industry’s ability to attract and prepare great young professionals for generations to come.

Cheers!

Why Can’t I Mail It? – Flats

As you know from parts one (postcards), two (self-mailers) and three (booklets) of “Why Can’t I Mail It?,” there are many times a design element causes a mailing to go at a higher rate of postage. This can be frustrating as well as expensive. In order to help you stay away from potential issues, here are some things to keep in mind as you are preparing a direct mail campaign. Finally, let’s look at flats:

As you know from part one (postcards), two (self-mailers) and three (booklets) of “Why Can’t I Mail It?,” there are many times a design element causes a mailing to go at a higher rate of postage. This can be frustrating as well as expensive. In order to help you stay away from potential issues, here are some things to keep in mind as you are preparing a direct mail campaign.

Finally, let’s look at flats:

  1. Flat-sized mail is between 6.126 x 11.51 to 12 x 15. These mailers have fewer restrictions as the equipment they run on at the USPS is very different. They lay flat, mail-panel side up, as they run through. Unlike the letter-size machines that run so they stand up on the edge below the mail panel.
    This means less damage happens to flat-size mail pieces. They also stand out in the mailbox better.
  2. Paper stock must be a minimum of 0.009 thick. The maximum thickness is 3/4 inch for the whole mailer. Usually this is not a problem since many flats are mutli-pages.
    Many people get creative here, since you can go a lot thicker. Just make sure you keep the thickness even throughout the mailer.
  3. No aspect ratio requirement. Since these run laying flat through the equipment, there is no need to adhere to a ratio.
    This gives you more freedom in your size design. If you want a more slender look, you can do it!
  4. Flats are required to have address blocks in the upper half of the short edge. For instance, with an 8.5 x 11 mailer, you would need to address from the top of the piece down only to 5.5, do not address below the 5.5. There is no barcode clear zone for flats. You will need to use an address block that includes the barcode, a 4 x 2 clear area, no varnish, UV coating, text or images. You must also make sure that you have at least a 0.125 clearance for the address block from the edge of the piece and any text or graphics.
    This requirement is not actually for the machines, but for the employees to more easily see the addresses when distributing the mail.
  5. The fold or binding must be to the right of the mail panel. If you are using a poly bag or envelope, this is not necessary.
    The reason they want it to the right is because as they pass through the machines laying down, the lead edge is on the right side.
  6. No tabs are required. In some cases, such as when you are inserting a piece loosely into the mailer, you may decide to use tabs to hold it closed. You may do that if you wish, it is just not a requirement to do so.
    Most people opt to not use tabs even when they have a loose insert, since in most cases they do not fall out.
  7. If you use a poly bag/envelope, the maximum extra space you can have inside the bag from the edge of the piece to the edge of the bag is 0.5. This is very popular now. It allows the recipient to see the creative through the clear material, as if it were just mailed without an envelope and then lets you put loose pieces together like when using a standard envelope.
    You can either address the materials on the inside of the bag or you can label the outside, both are acceptable as long as you are using USPS approved bags.

Your best bet is to design your flat and then send a pdf to your direct mail provider, to have them find any problems with the design. They can help to make sure you are automation compliant and save on postage. As you are going through the process, do not let it stop your creativity. It is the unique and creative pieces that get the recipients attention and increase your ROI. Do not let these regulations limit your design. There are plenty of ways to create self-mailers that standout and get attention! Contact your mail provider for samples and suggestions.