Are Your Marketing Messages Worth Your Prospects’ Time?

With no commuting, trips to the gym, or fun being had with friends and family, who doesn’t have more time today than they did a few short weeks ago? But on the other hand, given the seriousness of our circumstances, we all have less patience for marketing messages that seem frivolous or unnecessary.

On the one hand, with no commuting, trips to the gym, or fun being had with friends and family, who doesn’t have more time today than they did a few short weeks ago? On the other hand, given the seriousness of our circumstances, we all have less patience for marketing messages that seem frivolous or unnecessary.

In other words, attention is even more valuable, so you’d better be sure that your messaging is worth the time you’re asking your prospects to invest. Here are a few ways you can help your prospects see why it’s worth it to engage with you.

Advise and Connect

Forget the hard sell. Gain trust and attention by offering help in your marketing messages. What advice can you offer your prospects that they will find value in? What questions do you know prospects are asking as they begin their buying journey? What questions are they asking later in the process?

Those are the questions you need to answer. The trick is in answering them not only in a way that helps prospects solve their business problems, but also in a way that positions you as an expert and helps engender trust.

All without giving away your secret sauce.

Probably not something you can whip up off the top of your head, but most definitely something that will pay great dividends. Create content that matters and resonates, and you will connect with your desired decision makers.

Another Kind of Connection

Beyond the connection you want to make with your prospects, you can also make connections for your prospects. Are there colleagues you work with you can stand behind that will make your prospects’ business lives better? Make the connection and you’ll a happy prospect and a happy colleague.

Obviously, this doesn’t scale and isn’t appropriate for early funnel prospects, but it can be a great way to remain in contact with prospects as you nurture them over time.

Demonstrate Through Your Marketing Messages

Finally, create opportunities to demonstrate that you have the experience and expertise to make a difference in their business. Case studies and testimonials are great, as are interviews and presentaiotnsr with clients who you have helped succeed.

So forget the “just checking in” phone calls and “we’re new and improved” emails. Provide value in your marketing messages and they will be greeted warmly more often, and your prospects’ doors will more frequently be open.

Great Customer Experience Starts With Your Marketing

How your brand engages prospects sets the tone for the entire customer relationship. Here are three things your marketing must do to show prospects that you understand how to treat them as customers.

How your brand engages prospects sets the tone for the entire customer relationship. In fact, the customer experience — especially before purchase — is influenced more by when, where, and how you talk to them than by your website’s or app’s UX polish (although, bad UX can certainly still ruin the experience).

Here are three things every brand must get right to lay the foundation for a great customer experience.

1. Customers Must Be Interested in What You’re Saying

How often do you see marketing that you’re just not interested in? Is that a good experience for you as a customer? Do you think it’s a good experience when your brand’s marketing has the same impact on its potential customers?

The ability to control where and to whom your message appears is the core of successful omnichannel marketing, but brands get it wrong all the time.

It starts with knowing your current customers. Knowing what your audience wants to see in your marketing is a function of how well you understand the data around your current customers and how you apply those insights to prospects. For example, building look-a-like models based on your current customers allows you to target demographic and behavioral features in prospect audiences that make them likely to be interested in your messaging.

Once you understand the data points that will allow you to target prospects, your marketing must be able to put those insights into action. That’s where your omnichannel marketing strategy comes into play. Each channel has its own, unique ways to target audiences, and you need to be able to use those channels to deliver your messages to just the people who want to see them.

On social media, for example, you can target people by interests, likes, and follows that match what you know current customers are interested in. Online display advertising can target website visitors based on browsing profiles. Search ads target based on the search terms you buy.

There are a thousand ways to get there, but targeting your omnichannel messages is essential. Once you see engagement and know that marketing is on-target, then you can expand the customer experience strategy to reach new target audiences based on broader profiles.

By talking to prospects about things you know they’re interested in, you’re showing them that you understand what they need and you’re not going to waste their time.

2. Customers Must Be Open to Engaging on That Platform

Many brands put their marketing in front of people wherever they can and whenever they can, and the result is a generation of people who tune out marketing as little more than background noise.

It’s this simple: If your ad annoys people, it’s not a good customer experience.

The secret to providing consumers a good marketing experience is to be there when it’s helpful and not be there when it’s annoying. If your marketing is annoying, prospects will just tune it out — but they won’t forget that you annoyed them.

Many TV and online ads fall into this trap, but there are times and places for good marketing to create positive brand experiences. Direct mail is one channel that customers interact with on their own terms. Direct mail marketing is there when customers want it, not when they don’t. Even online marketing, despite the annoying nature of so many digital ads, can create a great customer experience if you put the ads in the right places at the right time.

Paid search, again, is a good example of advertising that works hand-in-hand with its platform to provide a positive experience. There’s no better time to promote your solution than when someone is actively asking the question.

Good omnichannel marketing doesn’t just focus on where leads may be found, it focuses on where leads have been found and where they engage and convert with the kind of marketing you’re doing. By positioning your marketing in the channels where your prospects want to engage with that kind of content, you start a customer journey that can make customers fall in love with your business.

3. The Time Must Be Right to Have a Customer Experience

Timing is everything. All the demographic and interest-based targeting in the world won’t turn bad timing into a good customer experience.

The timing of your marketing is affected by several cycles, some of which are universal, like seasonality, while others are unique to each customer or to your brand. Great omnichannel brands identify these cycles and use them to deliver great experiences.

There are important points in individual customer lifecycles, such as identifying when a known prospect will be ready to buy or an existing customer will be ready to repurchase. When a brand recognizes those moments and acknowledges them with a positive message, that creates a good customer experience. These milestones matter to your customers, and so do birthdays and other important dates in their individual years.

This is where customer journey maps can come in handy. By sketching out the entire customer journey from initial consideration through repurchase and (hopefully) product evangelism, you better understand what customers are doing at each step of the way. This helps you identify which messages are needed at milestone points in the lifecycle as well as the kind of experiences that will help nudge people from being just customers to true brand evangelists.

In the end, all of this work isn’t just about making marketing that converts more, it’s about creating marketing that connects with your target audience on a personal level. If you get these three things right before the purchase, you lay the foundation for a great customer experience throughout the post-purchase journey.

3 Ways to Make Your Content Marketing Work Harder for You

Content marketing success requires work before you begin writing, as well as after you’ve hit the publish button. Here are tips to help ensure you’re reaching the right audience with the right message.

To make your content marketing do more, you need to do more with it.

There are any number of reasons you may not be seeing the return you expect on your content marketing. Here are a few, and how you can address the issue to improve your results.

‘Write It and They Will Read It’ Is Wrong

Long gone are the days when anyone sane thinks that building a website will “automagically” win you an audience and convert that audience into paying clients. But there’s less clarity around the idea that simply publishing your content — even if it’s great content — is enough to power marketing properly. We see too many marketers doing just that.

The truth is that once you’ve published your content, you’re about halfway there. You still have the work of getting your content in front of the right audience. We can’t cover here all of the ways in which you can promote your content, but the list certainly includes social media, email marketing, paid digital advertising, and even old stalwarts like direct mail.

The goal is to reach beyond your existing network to attract new prospects. At the same time, you should be sure that what you’re writing encourages engagement. Will your prospects want to share it with their colleagues as they’re considering their options? Does it offer a different perspective than anything else out there?

You Haven’t Done Your Competitive Research

Speaking of which, do you know what kind of content your competitors are publishing? If you’re publishing the same kind of content and they already have a bigger audience, you face an arduous task.

There’s just so much content marketing going on now that if you’re not standing out from the crowd naturally, you’re going to have to work that much harder at the promotion and distribution we talked about above.

You’ll find it much more fruitful to stake a separate ground; either by offering a different perspective, concentrating on a very tightly defined niche, or differentiating yourself in some other way. Forget any ideas you have of doing the same thing better. Except in the rare cases where your competition is truly asleep at the wheel, better is going to be in the eye of the beholder, and you may not be as obviously superior as you think in their eyes.

Relevance Is Not Irrelevant

Finally, there’s the holy grail of knowing that what you write matters to your audience. In the B2B world, nobody is on your website because they have a few hours to kill and they’ve already watched all of the videos on YouTube. They’re on your website because they have a problem to solve.

If your content doesn’t help them solve that problem or give them a greater understanding of what they should be considering as they search for the best-fit solution, it isn’t going to get read. So even if you do everything else right — carve out a niche and promote your content to an expanding audience — you’re not going to see content marketing results, because you’re not going to attract the right audience.

And ultimately, that’s the goal of content marketing: attract the right audience in a way that gains their trust and moves them toward a decision — hopefully, a decision to work with you.

Is Quality, Sustainable Marketing the Key, or Is Bigger Better?

We are certainly increasingly “digitally distracted.” How can we not be, with a smartphone in hand, WhatsApp, LinkedIn, Facebook, and the toxic Twitter — binging and buzzing with notifications of everything from “the boss wants you in his office right now” to Aunt Mary reminding you of her birthday?

Is bigger better?

That’s a question being asked a lot lately; not only by marketers, but in almost every sphere of our existence.

“In a digitally distracted mediascape of fragmented attention — engagement is the name of the game for publishers now. Whether it is deepening direct connections to consumers, delivering real impact for advertisers, or building trust in your brand — quality matters now more than quantity.” Or so proclaims MediaPost.

There is a plentiful cornucopia for thought in that well-crafted come-on.

We are certainly increasingly “digitally distracted.” How can we not be, with a smartphone in hand, WhatsApp, LinkedIn, Facebook, and the toxic Twitter — binging and buzzing with notifications of everything from “the boss wants you in his office right now” to Aunt Mary reminding you of her birthday? There are endless and equally compelling “bits and bobs,” all demanding attention, preferably immediately or ASAP.

There certainly ought to be an app — there probably is one or more that I don’t know about — which sorts through all that incoming traffic, assigns each a priority — based on some measure of quality — and only passes on the ones that matter. The app would pass on the ones which make my digital distraction worthwhile, the ones that truly engage. It may seem simplistic, but perhaps there is a good reason people get engaged before they get married.

But could an app be clever enough to identify quality, or even define it? Quality definitely has something magical about it, the same ephemeral, but indescribable quality which inspired Supreme Court Justice Potter Stewart’s memorable definition of hardcore pornography, “I know it when I see it.”

Some years ago, at a ceremony thanking an American Ambassador for her support of a local NGO, she was presented with “a small gift.” Looking at the little blue box, the Ambassador smiled, thanked the giver and exclaimed: “You men really don’t understand. There is no such thing as a small gift from Tiffany.” She was instinctively crafting what could have been a great slogan for the store: It’s not the size, it’s the Tiffany that counts.

Since forever, commerce has been driven more by growth than quality. How few have been the examples of CEOs’ quarterly statements praising the company’s reducing revenue, even when accompanied by increased profits. It certainly goes against our capitalist cultural mainstream. “But will it scale,” ask the moneybags in evaluating whether the newest idea will become a unicorn? Perhaps something really is changing which will deliver the ability to “engage” to the forefront, rather than simply being able to “attract.” Then the unicorns of tomorrow may no longer be measured just by size.

We all know that almost any amount of attraction is for sale at so-much-per-thousand. Simply by spending more and more on marketing, we can even become household names. If there has ever been a particularly obscene example of this, one need look no further than the mega billions being spent on the 2020 U.S. election campaigns. In an age of “fake” news, will all of this expensive attraction be the best investment politicians can make in suspending voter disbelief and establishing a meaningful engagement with voters? How much of that spend will promote the truth and how much believed? Will the engagement be strong enough to be sure the prospect will vote the “right” way, whichever way that is?

Like what is in the Tiffany box, one of the rarest of gems existent today is the truth.

In a thoughtful column here a week or so ago, provocatively headlined: ‘The Truth Is, There Is No Truth — Let Alone in Advertising,’ Jeanette McMurtry wrote:

One thing we marketers need to also face is the how the “truth” we are putting out there is being received …

If anything has come out of the “fake” news movement, it’s that we are learning not to believe hype and claims that can’t be substantiated …

Marketers can overcome this jaded vision of the world and brands in business today by addressing truth firsthand. You can do this by creating more interaction between your brand and consumers online and in the real world. Let customers experience what you are all about — your products, your persona, your values — more than reading your carefully crafted statements.

Despite existing technology that lets us truly interact one-to-one from great distances, something still seems to be missing. It’s the magic piece of the puzzle that moves us from attraction to engagement, that wants us to comfortably spend time together. That “something” may be the “quality” of truth, in its broadest sense.

If quality and truth are not synonymous, they are at least comfortable bedfellows. As Jeanette says, the truth about “your products, your persona, your values” is much more likely, in these changing times, to lead to the kind of engagement which will generate better (although perhaps not bigger) profits.

If we look around us, sprouting like spring flowers are small, specialized retailers and e-tailers, none of which is ever likely to rival Amazon or Walmart in size. But they’re much more likely to establish that magic sense of engagement, which comes not only from being able to parse all the data out there; but, far more importantly, to fashion enduring customer relationships grounded on a firm foundation of truth.

The Value of ‘Old’ Marketing Content Is Finding What’s Evergreen

There is such a thing as having too much marketing content. Here’s your guide to evaluating the content you have to determine what you should keep, what you should update, and what you should delete.

It doesn’t take too terribly long to build up a library of some size if you’re generating articles and other content consistently as part of your content marketing. If you’ve been at it for a while, then you may have more content than you realize, more content than you need, and more content than is good for you.

You’re probably asking yourself, “Is that even possible? Having too much content?” The answer is “yes.” But the real questions you should be asking are, “how much is too much” and “How do I know what to keep and what to delete?”

Age Is Just a Number In Content Marketing

Your first thought might be the old rule about, “First in, first out,” which is an excellent rule of thumb for milk, meat, and other perishables. However, there’s no reason that your oldest content needs to be tossed first. In fact, if it’s still performing, it’s worth keeping.

A quick review of your analytics data will tell you what content is working, old or new. Just be sure you’re looking at your traffic data intelligently. Cumulative page views for a piece that’s been live for six years is likely to have far more page views than a 6-month-old piece over that 6-year period. Be sure to compare like data periods

Be sure, as well, to adjust for other factors, like any promotion you may be doing for one piece and not the other. (In this regard, the younger piece may look like the better performer, if you’ve recently featured it in social media posts, email marketing, etc.)

Once you’re sure you’re comparing apples to apples, it’s time to look for context. Is the traffic flow holding steady? Is it seasonal? Can you identify traffic sources for each piece? (Different sources will be of greater or lesser value.)

All of those data points should factor into your decision about keeping or deleting a piece of content, and on how to treat that content, if you do keep it. More on this below.

Engagement Matters, Part I

Knowing how many people are consuming a piece of content is great, but knowing how they’re consuming it and what the content is encouraging them to do is far more valuable.

Gather data points that tell you how frequently visitors take the action you desire. You may need to customize your calls to action (CTAs) to differentiate between actions taken in various places on your site. With that tracking in place, you can identify the pages that create more conversions. Digital marketing lives and dies by conversions, so developing content that converts reliably is critical.

Engagement Matters, Part II

Other engagement metrics matter, as well. Time on page, bounce rate, number of pages visited in the same session, and other metrics can all tell you how deeply your audience is connecting with a particular topic. These are no substitute for CTA engagement, but it is still worth examining these metrics as additional evidence for or against an article’s value.

Options Beyond ‘Kill or Keep’

There’s going to be some content that it’s clear should be kept and some that should clearly be killed. In the middle, you’re likely to find some that could go either way. A few options you have are:

Combining Content

If articles aren’t quite connecting with your audience as you’d like, perhaps combining two or more of them would help?

Refocusing Content

If a mid-pack piece is being outperformed by similar articles, change its focus. You don’t want to keep writing minor variations on the same content targeting the same keywords. Doing so almost always pits you against yourself in competition for top listings on a search engine results page. But a new take on a similar topic is worth exploring for SEO and conversion improvements.

Don’t Fear the Purge

Finally, resist the urge to keep everything. It can be tempting to keep the lid on your desktop trash icon firmly sealed. You worked hard, or invested resources, to generate the content you have. But your business changes, the market changes, and your content library has to change along with them. Purge anything that isn’t relevant to your business goals and is not helping you answer your audience’s most pressing questions.

Viewability: How to Act on This Gift to Advertisers and Return to Advertising Transparency

Viewability and engagement signals provide advertisers with the right tools to measure ad effectiveness and to determine whether or not they’re spending their media dollars effectively. Two of the most powerful signals for determining effectiveness include viewability and, of course, engagement.

Smart advertisers need the right tools to measure ad effectiveness and to determine whether or not they spent their media dollars effectively. Two of the most powerful signals for determining effectiveness include viewability, which launched onto the digital scene in 2014 and, of course, engagement (clickthroughs, time-on-site, shares, likes, follows, etc.). But how should advertisers interpret and act on these signals? And when, if ever, do these metrics overlap with each other, when it comes to buying and optimizing media?

Depending on the advertiser’s objective with a given media initiative, the answers will become far clearer.

Determine Strategic Objectives

The fact is, engagement signals should be leveraged differently and at various times, based on overarching strategic objectives. For example, advertising initiatives designed to foster product or service evaluation may rely on clickthroughs and time-on-site as measurements of ad effectiveness, out of necessity. Because of the targeted nature of the initiative that aims to elicit a response, engagement signals make sense. Optimizing for high-engagement ads, while buying viewable impressions, will likely result in a more qualified audience … at a price that may, or may not, be worth it. The advertiser simply must decide what makes economic sense on a case-by-case basis.

If an advertiser wants to drive inspiration and consideration among potential customers, then getting in front of as many viewers with whom the advertiser’s product or service could resonate becomes the primary objective. In this case, engagement metrics may fall short, as would cost-per-thousand impressions (CPM) since an impression, whether viewable or not, gets factored into that calculation. Relying solely on CPM gives only a partial indication of the effectiveness of the ad spend and no indication of the ad effectiveness, whatsoever. Enter viewability.

The Importance of Measuring Viewability

While still an imperfect measurement of ad effectiveness, viewability gives advertisers the option of only paying for impressions that were, in fact, “viewable.” While there has been some ambiguity around what qualifies as “viewable,” the Interactive Advertising Bureau (IAB) and Media Rating Center (MRC) have made strides in standardizing the industry’s definition (opens as a PDF) of “viewable.” According to its definition, an ad is only viewable if “a minimum of 50% of the ad is rendered on a user’s browser for a minimum of one second for display ads and two seconds for video ads.”

This improved transparency and common benchmark is critical, in order to continue growing upper-funnel channels and tactics by restoring advertiser faith in the impressions reported. By differentiating between impressions-served and impressions-viewed, advertisers at least have the choice to optimize toward impressions-viewed (at a higher CPM) vs. the opaque alternative.

Viewability Tools for Publishers

Now, even Google’s instituted a “viewability” signal for publishers in its Ad Exchange called “Active View.” Accredited by the MRC, Active View measures impressions generated across publishers’ websites and apps in real-time. Because advertisers increasingly opt to buy viewable impressions, Active View provides publishers with the information they need to increase the value of their display inventory, over time. Publishers with the most viewable inventory will benefit from this buying trend.

Viewability Is Long Overdue

It’s safe to say that viewability is critical and long overdue. It does not, nor should it, devalue engagement metrics. Viewability and engagement metrics can be leveraged simultaneously or irrespectively. Again, it’s important to consider what the advertiser aims to achieve and understand the broader shift in transparency viewability offers.

In full disclosure, I was reared as a direct response marketer, so I am naturally inclined to lean on engagement signals as measurements of ad effectiveness. However, the reflex to solely rely on these metrics can be myopic. If you, too, classify yourself as a direct response marketer, performance marketer or any other flashy way to describe advertisers who care about the bottom line, then I challenge you to question what those lexicons really mean.

Be on the lookout for viewability buzz to continue gaining steam and momentum. This data signal offers much more than a simplistic measurement of ad effectiveness. It provides a return to advertising transparency that has been long under siege in the world of display. It’s a positive step and has its place in enhancing the way we think about buying media.

The 5 Best HR Tips for Increasing Employee Engagement

Effective employee engagement improves sales figures, decreases workforce turnovers and improves client satisfaction. The companies with the healthiest company culture are those with management who actively engage with employees. Follow these five best HR practices for the most effective employee engagement.

Effective employee engagement improves sales figures, decreases workforce turnovers and improves client satisfaction. The companies with the healthiest company culture are those with management who actively engage with employees. Engagement within an organization is the most effective tool companies can use to track and encourage employee successes. 

Below are the five best HR practices for increasing employee engagement:

1. Employee Engagement Begins With Training

Employee training is key for ensuring new employees have a smooth transition into an organizations culture. An informative and instructive on boarding process is the foundation upon which  employee engagement begins with an organization’s goals. By communicating clear and defined expectations management can pave the path for reaching the desired results.

Unfortunately a lot of management teams fail to incorporate employee engagement into the company’s organizational structure. In fact, 55% of new hires are not provided a sufficient induction or training plan.

Every company has different organizational structures. For that reason, it is imperative that management outlines the key expectations of the role. Outlining job responsibilities is the framework for which employees can reach goals and is essential for success.

2. Communicate Role Expectations

Setting up initial goals and objectives within your organization is a great way to ensure that your staff is on the right track. Individual roles should have their own set of responsibilities. Be sure to make time every few months for communication between management and staff members. This fosters the opportunity to evaluate role satisfaction and develop a plan for employee progression and career development. This will not only increase autonomy and integrity in the work place, but also allows management to understand the respective areas of interest for future positions and hiring.

This will also bolster engagements and motivate your new employees to strive for excellence in all areas. A successful CEO will make sure that new hires have a sound understanding of the firm’s values, mission, and goals.

3. Active Engagement and Role Maintenance

Once management is confident that the new hires have fully settled in to their designated role, it is important to keep levels of employee engagement as high as possible.

Commitment and gratitude toward employees goes a long way. Model behavior for employees starts at the top. So, it is likely that a company’s staff will mirror that same level of commitment and gratitude in their work performance.

Regular “one-on-ones”, acknowledgments and objective setting will motivate employees to reach goals and improve their skillsets. Don’t be afraid to challenge your people and engage in healthy competition.

4. Promote From Within

There are many tools available for managers to utilize to acknowledge the accomplishments of their team. One of the most traditional and effective means of rewarding hardworking employees, is granting them a raise or promotion; or both if you can.  If available, promotion from within is key for morale and a great way reward your staff members for their hard work.

Promotion from within provides an extremely strong index of the firm’s core culture. Managers should recognize that the individual  rewards send a message to the entire organization. Be certain that the behaviors which are being endorsed by the promotion are in line with the firm’s culture and values. Again, being a model of positive behavior will ensure the remainder of the staff will look to emulate those behaviors you want to see reinforced.

Encouraging employee engagement through vertical communication is also great way to express mutual respect and show appreciation amongst one another.

5. Hire Multi-talented Employees

To maintain an edge in this increasingly competitive economy, companies need to ensure that they employ individuals referred to as “Unicorns” by HR managers. A Unicorn refers to a multi-skilled employee who is able to multitask and wear more than one hat.  .

Unicorns are normally talented in numerous areas and can execute them all beyond a superficial level. Finding these employees starts before the interview process. A persons references and past work experience provides a window to the type of benefits they can provide your company.

Here are some of the key advantages of hiring Multi-talented employees:

  • Multi-talented employees can save you a significant amount of money.
  • Employees with a wide range skill sets improve productivity and business efficiency. You won’t need to worry about the level of work quality since they’ll perform remarkably in all business tasks and projects handed over to them.
  • Having multi-talented employees allows for other team members to take sick and vacation days due to their ability to step into various roles. He or she can easily fill in and execute many jobs impeccably.
  • Improves staff retention and motivation.

 

Can Marketers ID a Budding Customer Relationship?

Many marketing departments are shifting from sales conversion to a more balanced relationship focus as their primary objective. As a result, there is increased focus on customer experience and customer loyalty.

Many marketing departments are shifting from sales conversion to a more balanced relationship focus as their primary objective. As a result, there is increased focus on customer experience and customer loyalty.

When it comes to measuring those efforts and related KPIs, however, most marketers are still thinking from a sales conversion perspective. Obviously, this is a problem, because KPIs influence most business decisions.

2 Common Oversights Preventing Proper Customer Relationship Identification

  1. Taking Credit for a Sale and Not a Relationship. Most marketers don’t take credit for the full lifetime value of their new customers. Rather, they are primarily focused on the sales conversion for each campaign. While lifetime value can be multiples larger than the initial sale for subscription type business, it can still provide a 30 to 60 percent increase in ROI for most other businesses. Alternative long-term measures, such as retention or repeat visits, are also helpful — but lack the holistic perspective of LTV. This is because they bifurcate the relationship between new business and repeat business and leave little room to measure brand affinity or experience-driven loyalty among new customers. If your marketing is attuned to relationship building, you should be targeting the right customers who will derive long-term value from your brand, and LTV allows you to take full credit for attracting the right customer. More important than getting the full credit for a new customer, however, is the change in perspective that a focus on relationship value will drive. Making lifetime value a component of your KPIs forces employees to think more about the types of customers they want and makes terms like engagement, relevance and brand affinity more than aspirational concepts.
  2. Failing to Measure the Value of Engaging Content. Many companies generate good engagement content, such as brand messaging, product info, newsletters, free apps etc. However, many do not take proper credit for it. Often, marketers treat this content as the first stage in a line of interactions leading to an eventual sales conversion, and it becomes lost in a multitouch attribution model. While sales attribution is important, it is also important to understand if the content fulfilled its immediate purpose. Assume you are an online clothier and you create a style guide to help customers understand versatile ways to wear your product. You’re tracking who downloads the guide and who shares the guide on social media, and then the information is used to segment these customers from those who are potentially less engaged. While this content did not necessarily lead to a direct sale, it did have tremendous value in conveying buying intent, brand affinity or even product preferences. Not all content is designed to drive immediate sales, but it should be designed to drive a specific set of behaviors, which should be measured and valued.

Bear with me as I pontificate for a moment. I am not a believer in over-measuring, but I do believe in purposeful measurement. I believe what you measure reflects the ambition and objective of what you plan to achieve. While not all relationship-focused activities can be easily measured, such as a caring customer interaction, in a digital world the customer’s behavioral response often can. Merely measuring the final behavior of a good relationship — repeat sales — is just too late in the experience journey and that seems to be what most companies are still doing today, despite their desire to build better relationships with their customers.

Content Marketing: Better Metrics Mean Better Measurement

It isn’t always easy to measure the impact of your content marketing or attribute sales, leads or lead quality accurately. One way to improve the quality of your measurement is to improve the quality of your metrics.

It isn’t always easy to measure the impact of your content marketing or attribute sales, leads or lead quality accurately. One way to improve the quality of your measurement is to improve the quality of your metrics.

Analytics data is easy to come by. In most cases it’s even available free or is included in services you’re already using, like an email service provider. That doesn’t mean all that data is useful.

In fact, having all of that data is a problem of its own — the firehose problem. As in, if a firehose is your only source of water, you’re either going to have to be creating in how you use it, or quenching your thirst is going to be a painful proposition.

Understanding Different Types of Metrics

Assuming you’ve solved that problem, and can isolate the data you want, it’s important to focus on business metrics rather than process metrics. We define these as follows:

  • Business metrics directly impact your businesses profitability (Sales, for example)
  • Process metrics are proxies that tell us about our marketing but not necessarily our business (Twitter followers are a good example)

As you’d imagine, business metrics are far more important, but many marketers focus more on process metrics because, well, they’re much easier to come by. Just log in to Twitter, Google Analytics or just about any other digital marketing platform and you’ve got your data.

What’s missing from that data for many B2B businesses is what we might call the last mile: the connection between content consumed and a sale consummated. That means measurement and attribution take much more effort. Marketing automation tools can help with this — and we certainly recommend that you implement the sort of tracking that these tools make possible — but even if you aren’t quite ready to make that commitment, there are adjustments you can make to the tracking you are doing.

Differentiating Between Initial Contact and Greater Engagement

Perhaps the best adjustment you can make is to move away from first-level metrics and toward second-level. So, rather than focusing on the number of Twitter followers you have, focus on the number of clicks you get to lead magnets you tweet about, the number of shares your posts get, and the number of likes your content garners.

That’s not to say that tracking your followers isn’t worthwhile. It is, particularly if you track the data over time. But it’s so much further removed from usable business metrics than the process metrics that measure the next step. That is, the folks who have not only followed you, but who have engaged with you via Twitter.

This is true of other social media channels and other content types. Rather than measuring just blog post page views (which I would argue are more valuable than Twitter followers), measure how frequently a blog post is shared, leads to a newsletter signup, a lead magnet click, or even clicks to other pages on your site.

While nothing is a replacement for the direct connection between content consumption and sales, tracking the engagement-based process metrics mentioned above is a much more accurate way to assess your content marketing’s health and effectiveness than relying on those metrics that measure just an initial interaction.