Measuring Customer Engagement: It’s Not Easy and It Takes Time

Here’s what’s easy: Measuring the effect of individual engagements like Web page views, email opens, paid and organic search clicks, call center interactions, Facebook likes, Twitter follows, tweets, retweets, referrals, etc. Here’s what’s hard: Understanding the combined effect of your promotions across all those channels. Many marketers turn to online attribution methods to assign credit for all or part of an individual order across multiple online channels. es as the independent variables.

Here’s what’s easy: Measuring the effect of individual engagements like Web page views, email opens, paid and organic search clicks, call center interactions, Facebook likes, Twitter follows, tweets, retweets, referrals, etc.

Here’s what’s hard: Understanding the combined effect of your promotions across all those channels.

Many marketers turn to online attribution methods to assign credit for all or part of an individual order across multiple online channels. Digital marketing guru Avinash Kaushik points out the strengths of weaknesses of various methods in his blog, Occam’s Razor in “Multichannel Attribution: Definitions, Models and a Reality Check” and concludes that none are perfect and many are far from it.

But online attribution models look to give credit to an individual tactic rather than measuring the combined effects of your entire promotion mix. Here’s a different approach to getting a holistic view of your entire promotion mix. It’s similar to the methodology I discussed in the post “Use Market Research to Tie Brand Awareness and Purchase Intent to Sales,” and like that methodology, it’s not something you’re going to be able to do overnight. It’s an iterative process that will take some time.

Start by assigning a point value to every consumer touch and every consumer action to create an engagement score for each customer. This process will be different for every marketer and will vary according to your customer base and your promotion mix. For illustration’s sake, consider the arbitrary assignments in the table in the media player, at right.

Next, perform this preliminary analysis:

  1. Rank your customers on sales volume for different time periods
    —previous month, quarter, year, etc.
  2. Rank your customers on their engagement score for the same periods
  3. Examine the correlation between sales and engagement
    —How much is each point of engagement worth in sales $$$?

After you’ve done this preliminary scoring, do your best to isolate customers who were not exposed to specific elements of the promotion mix into control groups, i.e., they didn’t engage on Facebook or they didn’t receive email. Compare their revenue against the rest of the file to see how well you’ve weighted that particular element. With several iterations of this process over time, you will be able to place a dollar value on each point of engagement and plan your promotion mix accordingly.

How you assign your point values may seem arbitrary at first, but you will need to work through this iteratively, looking at control cells wherever you can isolate them. For a more scientific approach, run a regression analysis on the customer file with revenue as the dependent variable and the number and types of touches as the independent variables. The more complete your customer contact data is, the lower your p value and the more descriptive the regression will be in identifying the contribution of each element.

As with any methodology, this one is only as good as the data you’re able to put into it, but don’t be discouraged if your data is not perfect or complete. Even in an imperfect world, this exercise will get you closer to a holistic view of customer engagement.

3 Success Factors to Insights-Driven Automation

Most marketers do not have a technology problem. In fact, we’ve crossed the chasm of a few years ago, when technology could not keep up with marketers’ vision of customer engagement. Now, we have so much technology, we can’t utilize it strategically and we struggle to integrate it.

Most marketers do not have a technology problem. In fact, we’ve crossed the chasm of a few years ago when, technology could not keep up with marketers’ vision of customer engagement. Now, we have so much technology we can’t utilize it strategically, and we struggle to integrate it.

At the same time, marketers do not have a data problem. There is more data than we can manage or use wisely.

Marketers do have an optimization problem when it comes to using their technology and data to generate meaningful insights. Many of us struggle with how to prioritize our integrated marketing technology, practices and teams in order to generate the kinds of insights (a key output of many of our technology and data solutions) which will move the needle for the business.

There are three factors to this challenge.

  1. Analytics must be integrated with campaign management.
  2. Content must be created to solve problems.
  3. Insights must be scored and prioritized.

First, We Have to Get the Analytics Closer to Our Outbound Messaging. Personalization is the key to successfully creating relevance for each customer, so the analytics can’t happen off to the side. It has to be integrated with our IMM/campaign management solution so that each customer and prospect will be connected with content that is important, and available at a time that will resonate.

We can pretty easily automate our marketing response to insights. Programmatic buying has been around for many years and is expanding beyond search to Web display, ad re-targeting and campaign management (outbound) solutions. The rise of the DMP (or DSP)—platforms which allow utilization of consumer data across websites—provides great benefit to marketers looking to serve customers and prospects as they interact with any combination of owned, earned and paid media. This is helping us identify the anonymous and known people in our marketplace. Yet, the insights from interactions with branded messages across the ecosystem are not yet accessible fast enough or completely enough to allow marketers to be nimble in serving customers. We have to get these programmatic insights back to the main IMM “hub” and the campaign messaging platforms.

We need automation to also serve the process. Marketing operations efficiencies like workflow and social CRM require these insights at scale. While truly integrated IMM on a single platform is nirvana, the marketing technology landscape is huge. Real engagement often requires a few tools that will work together.

Second, Our Content Creation Machines Have to Focus More on What Sells and Our Brand Purpose. Too much content is created simply because it’s interesting. That is not a high enough bar. If your product is water, then the content needs to be all about fire. Content has to create need and speak to the “Why” of what you do, not the “What.” Why brands produce a product is usually about vision, value, need and satisfaction. Look at those heartwarming Super Bowl ads—do Dove products make you a better dad? No. But the brand is about being true to yourself and to celebrating your own personal values. So the advertising content worked.

If 2015 has a theme in marketing, it’s got to be personalization. Of course that means something different now than it did 10 years ago, when we first started really considering what is possible with custom-branded experiences. Effective personalization now means curating the content that will resonate with each customer’s individual needs. Automation technology makes this possible through content blocks and integrated native advertising units.

Third, We Need More Discipline About the Types of Insights That Will Help Us Do More Effective Marketing. I’ve always found in marketing analysis that certain demographics have clear preferences in tone, pace and language when interacting with a sales rep or brand. We can capitalize on these preferences to increase sales and connect the right rep with the right type of customer.

One way to solidify the discipline is to have some sort of mantra or brand promise that is very clear, and so all analytics work can strive to generate insights that are true to that brand promise. Remember the Coca-Cola’s Content 2020 Manifesto? Auditing your landscape of opportunity and focusing on the areas that have the most impact on revenue and market share will help you identify the kinds of insights that are most meaningful for your business.

Granted, this task is complicated by the fact that much of our data is channel-specific and measures the effectiveness of campaigns against previous campaigns. We need more insights around the impact and engagement of individual customers. Silos are still present, and organizational structure can severely limit marketers’ ability to learn about the customer-level engagement. One way to bring the team together is to score insights as they are applied to the business (much as we score leads). Did this move the needle? Have we improved our reach or response? Are key audiences engaged? It’s not just a volume game, but an engagement game with priority, high-value customers.

With these three success factors in mind, marketers can use the technology they have in a test and learn methodology to help better understand how automated insights can grow the business. Once the key drivers are identified, we can start to also assess current technology and pare down the options for improving the integration and efficiency of your organization.

Are you automating the use of insights that help personalize the customer experience? Please share your success factors in the space below.

Tracking Mobile Ad Effectiveness With Real-Time Data

The volume of mobile data and the speed at which it is created continues to increase as the global population increases, as mobile device penetration rates rise, and as the consumer usage rate for social media grows.

The volume of mobile data and the speed at which it is created continues to increase as the global population increases, as mobile device penetration rates rise, and as the consumer usage rate for social media grows.

When analyzed effectively, this data can provide business insight on user sentiment, behavior and even physical movement patterns. Due to the sheer number of mobile devices in use, Big Data practitioners can tap mobile Big Data analytics to better understand trends across vast populations and sub-segments of users. This understanding helps business to improve engagement tactics and to optimize the delivery of services.

Mobile device data becomes particularly useful for analytics purposes when combined with extended data from outside sources. For example, weather and economic allow practitioners to correlate macro-level trends to a targeted set of users. These consumer segments have traditionally grouped users together based upon similarities. However, industry is increasingly focusing upon targeting towards individuals based upon their interests or upon their past behaviors.

Below you will find a number of ways you can apply real-time data analytics to your mobile marketing and advertising campaigns.

  • More Personalized and Targeted Ads
    Big data allows brands to better target users with more personalized interactions that drive engagement. We increasingly see ads featuring products and services we might actually want to use to make our lives better. These more personalized, more targeted ads are all based on massive amounts of personal data we constantly provide. Everywhere we go nowadays, we leave data crumbs. Following these trails reveals information about what we we’re doing, saying, liking, or sharing. Thanks to our mobile devices, this data trail now also hints at where we’re going.
  • Hyper-Localized Advertising
    The proliferation of mobile devices, primarily smartphones, has created a major opportunity for marketers to deliver contextual advertisements. These mobile-specific ads target the right people at the right time. For instance, through the combination of social data and location data, stores that shoppers are near and might be interested in can send out ads offering percentage discounts or other incentives. Delivered by shops to their shoppers in real time, these ads get consumers to walk through their doors. Hyper-localized advertising has been shown to increase customer engagement and conversion rates.
  • Leveraging Attribution to Achieve Mobile Engagement
    Leveraging Big Data about user behavior helps brands more accurately and completely quantify the effectiveness of their mobile marketing initiatives. Big data helps marketers determine whether their campaigns are creating the desired results. The ways users respond to branding assets can be used to literally create “rules of engagement” for each user or for each type of user. Marketers optimize their results through understanding varying levels of consumer engagement and through understanding the contributions of different campaigns across the path-to-purchase.
  • Real-Time Data Analytics Across the Complete Mobile Lifecycle
    In the past, conventional database solutions could be relied upon to effectively manage and analyze massively large data sets. But they did so at a snail-like pace, taking days and even weeks to perform tasks that often yielded “stale” results. By contrast, the big data analytics platforms of today can perform sophisticated processes at lightening-fast speeds, allowing for real-time analysis and insights. Shorter time to insight allows marketers to make real-time decisions and take immediate action based on fresh, reliable and relevant information.
  • Flip Traditional Consumer Profiling Upside-Down
    In the context of ubiquitous, real-time consumer data brands can now ask the data who their customers are. Contrast this to the erudite consumer profiling where consumers are targeted towards based upon their goodness of fit into an expected consumer picture. Rather than relying upon arcane consumer characteristics, instead we can now quantitatively choose targeting characteristics based upon the congruence of these characteristics with the desired call-to-action.

Brands are in desperate need for solutions that will help them understand the impact of their mobile advertising spend in the grand scheme of their broader marketing plan. This requires brands to go well beyond the click-through to be able to attribute their spend to in-store visits and better yet, sales.

What Is Social Selling and Where Do I Start?

Don’t let the hype about B-to-B social selling deceive you. Buyers have not reinvented the buying process. It has simply become a non-linear one. What is new are the sexy tools. However, using LinkedIn, Google+, blogging and YouTube effectively when prospecting isn’t sexy. It’s just a better process. Is social selling a revolution? No, it’s merely a chance for sales prospecting EVO-lution.

Don’t let the hype about B-to-B social selling deceive you. Buyers have not reinvented the buying process. It has simply become a non-linear one. What is new are the sexy tools. However, using LinkedIn, Google+, blogging and YouTube effectively when prospecting isn’t sexy. It’s just a better process.

Is social selling a revolution? No, it’s merely a chance for sales prospecting EVO-lution.

So let’s roll up our sleeves and discover: What is social selling and how are sellers generating more leads, faster? What is the process your sales team should be applying?

Social Selling Is a System
Let’s grip the wheel, firmly. Revolutions bring about change that make things easier or better. Has social media made your life easier lately? Are you getting more leads and closing them faster?

I rest my case!

Effective social selling is a system. Systems are not sexy.

A system is a repeatable process with a predictable outcome. Input goes in, certain things happen and out pops a result.

Social Prospecting: New but not Complex
The prospecting piece of social selling is mostly about:

  1. Getting buyers to respond and qualify faster, more often, and
  2. Turning response into dialogue that leads to a sale—faster, more easily

If anything is new about this process it’s the role direct response marketing techniques play. For example, social media copywriting is catching on.

The process today’s best social sellers are using generates leads faster by helping customers:

  • believe there is a better way (via short-form social content)
  • realize they just found part of it (using longer-form content) and
  • act—taking a first step toward what they want (giving you a lead)

Engagement and Trust Are not the Goals
Will you agree with me that engagement is not your sellers’ goal? Engagement is the beginning of a process. It’s a chance for front line reps and dealers to create response—and deeper conversation about a transaction.

If not, engagement is a chronic waste of your reps’ and dealers’ time.

I know “experts” insist that being trusted is a strategy. But it’s not.

It is the output of a successful prospecting strategy!

Increased trust is a sign your sellers are applying the process effectively. It’s not a goal!

As a small B-to-B business owner myself, I know what gets you paid. It’s not engagement. It’s not your image or personal brand.

You or your boss measures performance based on leads.

So let’s keep your social prospecting approach practical: Attention, engagement and a simple, repeatable way to create response more often. These are the components of an effective social selling system.

Why You Don’t Need a Social Selling Strategy

“What’s your social selling strategy?” I hear it all the time.
“You need one,” the experts insist.

But I say no, in most cases. Here’s why: Listen to what the experts say. Pay attention to what they say goes into a social selling strategy. Hint: It’s nothing new!

Yet we keep hearing “experts” claim listening is a new idea—or how we must get trusted to earn the sale.

So I give you permission to fire your social selling consultant or sales person if this is the best they can do.

What’s Your Telephone Strategy?
Not convinced? Consider how we don’t have B-to-B telephone strategies for prospecting. We have systems, approaches to applying the tool effectively. What defines our success in tele-prospecting?

Listening to customers? Nope. That’s the entry fee.

Trust? Nope. That’s the outcome we desire.

Success when dialing-for-dollars is based on if your system works—or not.

“You didn’t need a telephone strategy when the telephone was invented,” says sales productivity coach Philippe le Baron of LB4G Consulting.

“You learned how to use the new tool … to reach out to people you could never have dreamed of reaching … and get a face-to-face meeting with the ones who qualified.”

Today, tele-prospecting success has little to do with phone technology. It has everything to do with your telephone speaking technique—your conversational system.

Just the same, you don’t need a social media strategy today. You need a practical, repeatable process to increase sellers’ effectiveness (productivity) and make their output more predictable … using social media platforms.

Systems work for you. You don’t work for systems!

So don’t let gurus trick you into feeling like a laggard. Don’t let me catch you throwing money at sales trainers claiming buyers are fundamentally revolutionizing the way they buy. Focus on ways to:

  1. Get buyers to respond and qualify faster, more often, and
  2. Turn response into dialogue that leads to a sale—faster, more easily

Good luck. Let me know how I can help!

Automated Marketing: Drip vs. Nurture

Yes, Virginia, there is a difference. Earlier this week, I was interviewed by a reporter doing an article on nurture campaigns and was surprised that she did not differentiate between drip and nurture marketing. In fact, I know many seasoned marketers who also do not follow separate protocols for these two disparate approaches to marketing. So, while you may well disagree with me, here’s how I see it and how we develop campaigns for our clients

Yes, Virginia, there is a difference.

Earlier this week, I was interviewed by a reporter doing an article on nurture campaigns and, as I had been in so many conversations before, was surprised that she did not differentiate between drip and nurture marketing. In fact, I know many seasoned marketers who also do not follow separate protocols for these two disparate approaches to marketing. So, while you may well disagree with me, here’s how I see it and how we develop campaigns for our clients.

Blast
Blast campaigns are not automated, though you might well schedule a blast to deploy automatically. A blast email is a single event—think of your weekend sale, your newly released demo, or your new YouTube video. You’ll send out a single email making this announcement. Let’s suppose, however, that you have a podcast series and each episode posts early Monday morning. Now, we’re talking automation.

Drip
Drip marketing is designed to keep you top of mind when your recipient is ready to enter or reenter the sales funnel—gentle reminders. These emails or direct mails are of a similar design and usually based upon a branded template or theme. The message is general and is sent to a general list. Of course, personalization and segmentation will ensure that your message is targeted and better received even when using a general list, but the message is sent on a predetermined schedule. We often refer to this as the passive path.

Think of the drip-irrigation system, from which this campaign style acquired its moniker. The water drips at a consistent rate regardless of whether or not the plant is thirsty. Drip, drip, drip. Your campaign should do the same.

In order to determine the frequency of the drip, or touch, you will need to test or survey your audience. If you are a nationwide pet food supplier, you might find that twice a week is the right pace. If you’re selling enterprise software, perhaps it’s more like once every two weeks. The span of time in between drips does not change the definition or purpose. You are regularly pinging your constituents with a cue describing an existing relationship and providing information that, in the long run, will contribute to their buying decision.

Eventually your recipient will receive a message from you—either at exactly the right time or of the ideal offer—and they will engage—click to watch, download, or take a test drive. Now it’s time to get your nurture campaign involved.

Nurture
Unlike the drip campaign, the nurture campaign fires off at will each time your recipient engages. When you send a drip event offering a preview of your new video and the recipient clicks to view, your nurture campaign should automatically deploy a message thanking them for viewing the video and offering up a link to something that nudges them to the next step in the purchasing process. Perhaps this is a white paper or a demo. It might even be a meeting with a sales person.

To build your nurture steps, give consideration to your current sales process: You acquire a lead, qualify the lead, nurture the lead by providing additional information as needed, and at some point close the sale. It’s critical to sit with your sales team and discuss their current process for closing sales. Along with management and your creativity, you should be able to architect a campaign that is a digital (or, if direct mail, a physical) representation of the sales team’s approach. Here’s a rough sketch of what that might look like:

  1. Acquire a lead
  2. Welcome the lead – for your first touch, consider a blast email that simply proves deliverability. If the email successfully makes it to the inbox and/or is opened, clicked, or not deleted, shuttle the opened and non-deleted emails to your drip segment (until such as time as they too engage and become a member of your nurture segment) and the clickers to your nurture segment.
  3. Qualify the lead – this might be an email that simply provides links to your social-media accounts, a YouTube video, a resource download, or high-value areas of your website.
  4. Auto-respond appropriately to the lead – With each specific type of engagement, automatically send a prepared message (called an auto-responder) that acknowledges the engagement, thanks them for the engagement, and offers an accelerated engagement (the next logical step in the sales process). For example, if they watched a video, now might be the time to offer them a white paper on the same subject. For someone shopping for dog food, you might offer them first a video on the benefits of this brand, if they watch the video, the next auto-responder might be a coupon on that brand, if they do not redeem the coupon, the next auto-responder might be a coupon with a higher-value discount and more urgency (shop until midnight tonight and get free shipping). If they still pass on the coupon, consider a video on another brand.
  5. Rinse and repeat. For each engagement, respond appropriately, and offer an accelerated engagement acting as a nudge in the right direction – your shopping cart or offline purchase.

If you’re using a CRM, each event can and should contribute or deduct from your lead score. For instance, if a lead unsubscribes, you can deduct from the lead score and if they open the email, follow you socially, watch the video, download the resource, or visit your website, you can add to your lead score.

We call the nurture campaign the active path because your recipients are actively engaged.

Automated and manual monitoring of your engagement in blast, drip, and nurture events is important. It ensures that you do not continue to email messages that are missing the mark and enables you to move drip recipients into the nurturing path at the appropriate time.

Recipients in the nurturing path that show no signs of life should be kicked back to the drip campaign and those in the drip campaign who are without a pulse should be retired so as not to adversely affect your sender reputation.

A Weird, But Effective Shortcut to Generate Sales Leads on LinkedIn

See what I just did? You chose to read this article—probably because the headline provoked curiosity. It’s one of the oldest tricks in the book, the basis of effective copywriting. True, there is no silver bullet for generating sales leads on LinkedIn. However, there is one habit that consistently brings my students and me more success generating leads online: Giving customers a reason to click and take action—relieve that nagging pain or take a step toward an exciting goal.

See what I just did? You chose to read this article—probably because the headline provoked curiosity. It’s one of the oldest tricks in the book, the basis of effective copywriting. True, there is no silver bullet for generating sales leads on LinkedIn. However, there is one habit that consistently brings my students and me more success generating leads online: Giving customers a reason to click and take action—relieve that nagging pain or take a step toward an exciting goal.

Yes, creating curiosity that lures customers to act seems like an obvious strategy. So, are you and your team doing it?

Engagement Is NOT the Goal: It’s the Entry Fee
At the simplest level these are our goals:

  • Grab attention, hold it long enough to…
  • provoke engagement in ways that…
  • earns response (generates a lead).

Will you agree with me? If you don’t get response to content placed on LinkedIn, you’re wasting precious time.

Will you also agree engagement is not the goal on LinkedIn? I know we’ve been told it is. It feels strange saying it’s not. But engagement is the beginning of a courtship process.

Whether it happens on your profile or inside LinkedIn groups, engagement is the entry fee. It’s your chance to create irresistible curiosity—or let your customer click away.

LinkedIn can be a big time-saver. It can scale your ability to generate leads. But only if you adopt a successful paradigm, one where engagement is the beginning, not the end. I’m talking about a world where it’s easy to get response—using a system to get customers curious.

3 Steps to Generating Leads on LinkedIn
Here are my best tips on structuring what to say and when—so you create hunger for more details in potential buyers. Remember, intense curiosity is the goal.

The idea is to give prospects temporary satisfaction. When you post updates, engage in LinkedIn groups or dress up your profile, answer customers’ questions in ways that satisfy. However, make sure your answers cause more questions to pop into their heads. That’s when you’ll hit ’em with a call to action that begins the lead generation journey.

Here’s where to start—either on your profile or in a LinkedIn group where prospects can be found: Answer a question your target market needs answered in a way that focuses on a nagging pain or fear. The idea is to directly or indirectly signal, “this discussion will help you overcome _____” (insert fear or pain).

If responding to an existing question make your comment suggest, “I’m here with a new point-of-view” or “I’m here with a fresh, new remedy to that pain.”

When you communicate follow these guidelines:

  1. Get right to-the-point. When you start or contribute to a LinkedIn group discussion be like a laser. Don’t make readers wait for the solution. Hit ’em with it. However start by…
  2. Revealing slowly. When it comes to all the juicy details of your remedy take it slow. Slow enough to encourage more questions—to create curiosity in the total solution. When you do this, make sure you are…
  3. Provoking response by leveraging customers’ curiosity.

Yes, be action-oriented and specific. But avoid being so complete that readers become totally satisfied with your words.

Make Your Answers Generate More Questions
Think of this like a successful dating encounter. Masters of the courtship process have always known the secret to creating intense curiosity: Being a little mysterious. Suggesting “I’ve got something you might want.” Holding a little information back. Strategically timing the sharing of information.

We’re trying to get the other person to be curious about us. So the best way to spark curiosity is to answer questions in direct ways that satisfy—but only for the moment. Answers should generate more questions … spark more curiosity in what we are all about.

Of course, we need to be credible. We cannot risk playing games with the other side. Yet being a little mysterious is fair play. It encourages more questions. This is how to generate leads on LinkedIn.

In business it works the same. Your ability to start generating sales leads on LinkedIn will be determined by an ability to answer questions in ways that provoke more questions from the buyer. Good luck!

Short Video vs. Long Video: The Results

The short video vs. long video results are in for our event promotion. After a few twists and turns in the road, we learned that six seconds may not be long enough to deliver what you need in your messaging. We also learned that there are advantages of using Vimeo over YouTube, and that engagement is different based on the style of video you choose to create. But when it comes down to if we’d conduct a short video clip test for this group again, the answer

The short video vs. long video results are in for our event promotion. After a few twists and turns in the road, we learned that six seconds may not be long enough to deliver what you need in your messaging. We also learned that there are advantages of using Vimeo over YouTube, and that engagement is different based on the style of video you choose to create. But when it comes down to if we’d conduct a short video clip test for this group again, the answer is that it’s not likely. But “not likely” may be more of a function of continuing to do something different to capture the interest of fans. It’s the “been there, done that” attitude, and what are we, the direct marketers, going to do next time to top this.

Our results suggest it was the meaty, long-form content videos that got the attention of patrons.

But that said, the short video clips attracted attention and engagement. The repetition of the short video clips likely conditioned the audience to become intrigued with the upcoming shows, resulting in higher conversion toward the show date as they paid more attention to the long-form videos released at the end of the campaign.

(If the video isn’t just above this line, click here to view it.)

In the words of blogger Seth Godin, “delivering your message in different ways, over time, not only increases retention and impact, but it gives you the chance to describe what you’re doing from several angles.”

In our video format mix to promote a performing arts organization’s shows, we produced a long-form behind-the-curtain video and a long-form music video. The behind-the-curtain video, like those we have used for past shows, resulted in double the views of individual short video clips. But in defense of the short video format, when views of the five video clips are combined, they are more than double that of the long-form video.

Other results we’ll share in today’s video include how our emailed patrons responded to a series of weekly messages. It became clear that fans like longer videos with more meaty content. That’s what generated the highest email open and clickthrough rate, and generated the best engagement on social media.

Because we know that video works, as evidenced by the 20 percent increase in ticket sales last Christmas, we will continue to use video as the central delivery vehicle for direct marketing of show tickets in the future for this organization.

All-in-all, it was a good test. As a direct marketer, you know that you must dig into the numbers and analyze results every step along the way to see if your tests work. You won’t always hit a home run. But sometimes you have to venture out of your comfort zone to discover what could be the next big marketing opportunity for you. Learn more in today’s video.

Tapping Facebook Analytics to Identify Engaging Video Styles

Your online video style makes a difference in how your audience engages with you. Today we’ll compare three styles of video we’ve used, and what Facebook analytics reveal about where we experienced the highest levels of engagement. We begin with an overview of Facebook Insights data and charts, and then share engagement metrics to help you understand what kind of video style you may want to use

Your online video style makes a difference in how your audience engages with you. Today we’ll compare three styles of video we’ve used, and what Facebook analytics reveal about where we experienced the highest levels of engagement. We begin with an overview of Facebook Insights data and charts, and then share engagement metrics to help you understand what kind of video style you may want to use for your audience.

In today’s video, you’ll see how it’s the Facebook “Talking About This” numbers you need to pay attention to. You’ll also see that we found an older age demographic engages at a higher level than younger people (something we didn’t expect). Get the full story in today’s video presentation:

(If the video isn’t just above this line, click here to view it.)

While Facebook Insight charts are a great tool, you need to export data into a spreadsheet for the deeper dive analysis. If you download that data, brace yourself for an avalanche of information. As a direct marketer, you’ll have greater use for certain data points over other information.

Thorough analysis of these data has helped us understand the audience engagement from three distinct types of videos.

  1. 2-3 minute “Behind-the-Curtain” storytelling videos
  2. 3-5 minute “Music Videos” sharing free content
  3. 20-35 second “Short Clip Videos”

If you follow our blog, you know we’ve been using the results of video performance from a non-profit performing arts organization. To sell tickets for Christmas Shows, we used a series of two to three minute videos we called Behind-the-Curtain. We also used music videos, delivering more of a content marketing video format, where we took full-length recorded songs, three to five minutes long, and matched them with images to complement the music.

Last month, we introduced short video clips as the format in a contest to promote a performance in mid-April. Each clip featured a new song that would be introduced on the show for the first time. Each of these video clips was twenty to thirty-five seconds long.

The short video clips had the highest average lifetime post total reach. A significant contribution to that difference is that several hundred more fans have been attracted to the fan page since the behind-the-curtain videos were released.

The longer music videos had the highest engagement and featured content the audience wanted to experience. This format generated the highest number of likes, comments and shares, reinforcing the effectiveness of using video in content marketing.

Even though the numbers for lifetime reach and engagement from our behind-the-curtain videos were smaller in absolute numbers, we believe the percentage of engagement is respectable. More importantly, though, the campaign where we used behind the curtain videos and music videos produced a sales increase of 20 percent.

Our conclusion from these results tells us that it’s a combination of video styles that should be used to effectively market your organization. Audiences can burn out quickly if you repeat the same approach over and over. One of our challenges, and a challenge you most surely share, is how do you build on your success and offer up something new and different that continues to engage your audience, and at the same time generate leads, sell more of your product or increase contributions.

Our next blog will complete this series on our short video campaign test. We’ll share email marketing results, landing page views, along with other metrics including ticket sales. As always, please share your comments below.

The Most Powerful Content Marketing Lesson Learned (That Nobody Is Talking About)

In the last few years, of what’s being called online content marketing, what have we learned? When all the blogs, whitepapers, ebooks, podcasts and YouTube videos have been produced, what can we say we learned, took action on and improved? The single most important lesson learned for me, and in my research, has been how engaging customers should never be the goal. Instead, engagement is the starting point. It’s an open door to get customers to respond to you, your brand.

In the last few years, of what’s being called online content marketing, what have we learned? When all the blogs, whitepapers, ebooks, podcasts and YouTube videos have been produced, what can we say we learned, took action on and improved?

The single most important lesson learned for me, and in my research, has been how engaging customers should never be the goal. Instead, engagement is the starting point. It’s an open door to get customers to respond to you, your brand.

Engagement has so many of us so wrapped up that we’re failing to realize a key point: Engaging is merely a chance to enter into a journey with a prospect; a trip toward whatever it is they need, desire, hope for or need to avoid.

Engagement should be (if it’s to be effective) the start of a series of “fair exchanges” that guides prospective buyers toward, or away from, what you’re selling.

If it’s not? You’re just engaging for the sake of engaging. You’re not generating, nurturing and closing leads.

Be Provocative to Generate Response
Most marketers and sellers using blogs, video, YouTube, LinkedIn and such in their online content marketing strategy think of customer engagement as a goal. The finish line. But that’s not going to help you get customers to buy online.

Successfully engaging with customers is an opportunity to generate response from them. Actually selling on social media means being thought provoker-not just a thought leader.

You’ve got to get customers to do something-to begin a journey toward converting to a lead.

Think of it this way:

  • Are you giving customers a reason to talk to you on LinkedIn? A real, compelling reason.
  • Are your blogs so bold they provoke readers to call or email you or sign-up for an offer?

Is whatever you’re doing on social media provoking customers to contact you-so your sales team can help them more clearly understand the thought you just provoked?

Don’t Settle for Engagement
Do you have honestly new knowledge or a new product that can benefit customers in exciting, new ways? Then why would you settle for floating your thoughts out there and hoping to be dubbed a leader?

Does getting your content shared mean that much to you … more than getting leads does?

I realize for some of you the answer will be yes! To those readers I say this: Instead why not give customers a reason to act on the impulse your thoughts can create? This way prospects take action on doing something they really need and want to do … AND create a lead for yourself.

Tempt Prospects to Act
If you watch what I do in my online training business I’m always tempting prospects to trade their contact information for a better way… or tips on avoiding risks.

I’m teasing prospects into taking an action that I know they want to take.

For example, I like to reveal a small part of a hidden opportunity to them on my YouTube videos.

So … you can engage customers and hope that focused conversation gets going or you can cause it directly.

It all starts with realizing engagement is not the goal and knowing how to nurture a lead who isn’t ready to talk about your product or services yet.

So think of engagement as the first step to creating response. If you do you’ll start making social media sell for you more often.

Good luck and see you in comments below! Feel free to disagree with me, share your successes with this technique, etc.