How to Improve Google Landing Page Experience and Ad Quality Scores

If you run a small business, transitioning from print ads in local media to Google Ads can involve a steep learning curve. When you purchase an ad in the alt-weekly people grab as they leave the grocery store or the coupon mailers that come in the mail every Tuesday, you know exactly what to expect — you know when, where, and how often your advertisement will appear.

With Google Ads, there are no guarantees. You create an ad and set a budget, but will anyone see it? This is a source of frustration for many businesses that are new to using Google Ads, and it’s one of the reasons why a lot of people end up throwing in the towel.

Today, I’m going to demystify Google Ads by explaining one of the key factors in getting Google to display your ads: Landing Page Experience.

Ad Quality Scores and Landing Page Experience

While search engine ranking algorithms are essentially a mystery, Google Ads has a little more transparency when it comes to their Ad Quality Scores. The better your score, the more often your ad will be displayed to users searching for your keyword.

Landing Page Experience is one of three important criteria Google uses to assign an Ad Quality Score. Many people agonize over finding just the right keywords and crafting the perfect copy for their Google Ads, but they spend no time working on their landing page — this is a huge mistake. Google wants to ensure that there’s congruence between your ad copy and your landing page; they also want to see that once people click through to your site, they’re not quickly leaving because they’re not finding what they need.

What Does Google Look for in a Landing Page?

If you’re struggling to get your Ad Quality Score up so more people see your ads, it’s time to take an in-depth look at your landing page. Take a step back, look at your site from the perspective of a user, and ask yourself the following questions:

Is your landing page clear?

Your landing page should be easy to read, with the information people need front-and-center. Include calls to action and be judicious with the number of links on the page — you don’t want it to be too easy for people to click away from the page and leave.

Is your landing page useful?

Remember: your landing page needs to serve your customer’s needs, not yours. You may want them to sign up for your newsletter, but what’s the benefit for them in doing so? How are you helping the user? How will following through with your call-to-action (CTA) improve their lives?

Is your landing page related to your keyword?

Your landing page should be specific, not generic. If you’re an HVAC business and you’re advertising air conditioner repair in Houston, but you’re sending people to your homepage instead of a page specifically tailored to that keyword, you’re losing business. Every additional click people need to make in order to find what they need increases your drop-off rate.

Is your website transparent?

In both search and in ads, Google is increasingly looking for transparency. They want to know who you are and why people should trust you — in other words, they want to vet your business to make sure it’s legitimate. Providing links to social media, customer reviews, and other social proof can give Google (and potential customers) confidence in your business.

Does your website load quickly?

Your landing page isn’t the place to pull your Instagram feed, have display ads, and showcase ginormous high-res images. Instead, your landing page should be streamlined. Optimize it for mobile, reduce image sizes, and remove all scripts that cause lags.

Does your website have intuitive navigation?

In addition to optimizing your landing page, you’ll also want to make sure your entire website is organized in a way that makes sense. Implementing a website taxonomy with clear page hierarchies and logical categories is also great for SEO, so it’s worth taking the time to get right.

Learn More About How to Perfect Your Google Ads Campaign

Your landing page is just one of the key factors in your Ad Quality Score.  If you’re struggling to increase your Quality Scores, then click here to grab a copy of our Ultimate Google Ads checklist to help uncover areas to improve your campaigns.

How Your Landing Page Is Sabotaging Your Google Ads Success

You’ve read all the tutorials. You’ve spent countless hours poring over demographic data for targeting, crafting the perfect ad copy, and tweaking your campaign. In fact, you’re doing everything you’re supposed to do — but you’re still not seeing any success with Google Ads. Does this sound familiar? If so, the problem probably isn’t with your ad campaign. Instead, look to your landing page for answers.

Here are five ways your landing page could be sabotaging your success with Google Ads.

Your Landing Page Doesn’t Match Your Ad

I’m big on the concept of congruence, which is a fancy way of saying that your ad and your landing page need to make sense together. A landing page is your opportunity to expand upon the copy in your ad. Rather than thinking of your ad and your landing page as two separate pieces, think of your ad as the synopsis or introduction to the landing page on your site.

If you own a furniture store and you’re creating an ad for bunk beds, but your landing page goes to a category page for all beds, it’s frustrating for your customer. They want to click the ad and see exactly what they came to your site for. The more they have to poke around your website to find what they need, the more likely you are to lose them in the process.

It’s also important to note that Google also wants your landing page to match your ad — they give higher quality scores to landing pages with text that is relevant to the text in the ad.

This leads us to our next mistake…

Your Homepage Is Your Landing Page

Repeat after me, “My homepage is not a good landing page. My homepage is not a good landing page. My homepage is not a good landing page.”

I’ve reviewed countless Google Ads accounts that were making this mistake and it was costing them hundreds to even thousands per month. If you’re advertising a service, your ad should go directly to a landing page focusing on that particular service; if you’re advertising a special deal or promo code, your ad should go directly to a landing page explaining how customers can take advantage of it.

To further expand on a point from above, you simply can’t expect potential customers or clients to find what they need. People are busy, impatient, and they don’t want to do the work. Hold their hands and guide them to the actions you want them to take. Create unique landing pages customized to all of your ads. Is it a bit of work? Yes. Is it worth it? Also yes.

Visitors Are Met With a Wall of Text

There are some boilerplate landing pages out there that are heavy on text, with a “Buy Now” button placed between every other paragraph. These are old school, but you still see them around occasionally and even businesses that don’t use these templates often borrow from the concept.

People aren’t interested in reading a dissertation about your product, service, or offer. That’s not how you make a sale. Instead, use bullet points, headings, and short paragraphs. Incorporate images and graphics and have a good headline that is congruent with your ad copy.

Your copy should be clear and concise—your landing page isn’t the place to write bloated SEO-style text that uses a lot of words to say very little. Keep it snappy and include calls to action.

It Loads Slowly

This one is self-explanatory so there’s not much more to add here. Google hates slow sites and so do consumers. Audit your site speed and replace or eliminate any code or plugins that are causing lags. People aren’t going to sit around waiting for your site to load — they’ll just click the back button and try another site instead. This is especially true for mobile, which leads to…

Your Site Isn’t Optimized for Mobile

It’s 2020. Smartphones have been around for a long time now. There’s no excuse not to have a site that’s optimized for mobile. These days, there are people who do virtually all of their internet searches on their phones. If your site requires a lot of pinching, zooming in, scrolling to the side to read long lines of text that don’t fit on the screen, etc., not only are people not going to bother, it also sends a message that your business is behind the times.

Want More Help With Your Google Ads Campaigns?

Click here to grab a copy of our Ultimate Google Ads Checklist.

Use Your Ideal Customer Avatar to Boost Google Ads Performance

There are a lot of components involved in a successful Google Ads campaign, but there’s one overarching theme that connects most of them: thinking like your customer.

There are a lot of components involved in a successful Google Ads campaign, but there’s one overarching theme that connects most of them: thinking like your customer. Many small business owners who do their own marketing are simply too attached to what they do to take a step back and look at things from a different perspective. An ideal customer avatar can help.

What Is an Ideal Customer Avatar?

An ideal customer avatar — also known as an ideal customer persona or profile — is a hypothetical person who would purchase your goods or services. You may have one or a few, depending on your business, but you don’t want to have too many — the key word here is “ideal.” Avatars are quite granular, which helps you really get in the mindset of your customer. To start creating an avatar, think about your customer’s:

  • Basic demographics (age, sex, location, marital status)
  • Income bracket
  • Education level
  • Hobbies and interests
  • Occupation
  • Household size

This is all useful, but next, we’re really going to dig deep. Here’s where you think about the mindset of your customer and go beyond the numbers and stats. Ask yourself:

  • Why do they need your product or service? How will purchasing your product or service improve their lives?
  • What are your customer’s goals?
  • What are your customer’s core values?
  • What challenges do they face? What are their pain points?
  • What would they be searching for on Google that would lead them to your business? (This question will also help you decide which keywords to target.)

To really help you connect with potential customers, you can take this a step further an write a profile of your avatar in narrative form.

Using an Ideal Customer Avatar for Google Ads

One of the biggest mistakes you can make with Google Ads is to market what you think the benefits of your product or service are. When you do this, you can easily fall into the trap of being too vague and assuming that the very existence of your business is compelling enough to drive sales.

When your Google Ads aren’t customized to your ideal customer, it’s just like launching a campaign with no parameters in place. Throwing things at the wall and seeing what sticks is never good marketing — it’s all about targeting the right customer.

Take the ideal customer avatar you created and think about what would prompt them to click through to your website and make a purchase. Go back to those questions we asked earlier and use them to create customized ad copy. Tell them how your business:

  • Will make their lives better.
  • Will help them meet their goals.
  • Fits in with their values.
  • Will help them overcome their challenges.
  • Is what they’ve been looking for.

Use your most compelling call to action in your Google Ad; keep it short, punchy, clear, and direct. Then, build on that call to action with a custom landing page for each ad you create. The landing pages should touch on all of the points above and flesh out the CTA in your ad.

Naturally, you’ll want to take the demographics you’ve decided upon for your ideal customer avatar and use those in targeting your ads. Remember, you don’t want people clicking on your ads if they’re not going to make a purchase, so don’t be afraid to target a very small subset of Google users.

Expanding Beyond Google Search Ads

When you’re ready to expand your ads beyond Google Search, then you need to expand on your customer avatar. Ask and answer questions like:

  • What publications do your customers read?
  • What podcasts do your customers listen to?
  • What types of websites are your customers visiting?
  • What other complimentary businesses are your customers buying from?
  • What products or services do your customers buy before or after purchasing from your business?

The answers to these questions will help guide your decisions about how to expand your campaigns to other ad networks like Google Display, YouTube Ads, and Facebook Ads.

Want more tips to improve your Google Ads performance? Click here to grab a copy of our Ultimate Google Ads checklist.

 

 

How to Use Google Analytics to Improve Google Ads Performance

Google Analytics can be a treasure trove of information to help improve the performance of your Google Ads campaigns. However, trying to figure out all of the the various metrics within Google Analytics can be a big stumbling block for advertisers.

Google Analytics can be a treasure trove of information to help improve the performance of your Google Ads campaigns. However, trying to figure out all of the the various metrics within Google Analytics can be a big stumbling block for advertisers.

The sheer volume of numbers and data available can quickly get overwhelming.

The Key to Finding Value in Google Ads Metrics

Both Google Analytics and Google Ads metrics and reports should be looked at in the context of your business. Are you using the platform effectively enough in ways that benefit your business? What is it you value most, when it comes to your company?

These are a couple of questions you might want to focus on as you comb through your Google Analytics metrics. Understanding what you want to accomplish with your ad campaign can help you narrow down metrics that matter to your bottom line.

  1. What audience demographics do you wish to attract?
  2. Are visitors able to find the thing they are looking for after clicking your ad?
  3. Is your landing page delivering the type of conversions you are after?
  4. From which channels would you like to direct most of your traffic?

Let’s look at how certain Google Analytics metrics and reports can help with Google Ads.

Give Visitors a Great Experience

Do you know what visitors hate the most about clicking on an ad? Not finding what they need. This can ultimately hurt your brand, if your Google Ads campaigns are frustrating prospective customers.

Sure, your Google Ads conversion rate can help give you this insight, but it doesn’t give you the full story. If your ads are not converting as well as you’d like, then you need to dive into Google Analytics to see what’s going on.

First, take a look at your your landing page bounce rate. That’s the number of visitors who see your landing page and then leave without clicking to a second page. A high bounce rate means your landing pages are not living up to the promises you’re making in your ads.

Gain Insight Into Your Website Design

What good does it do to drive prospective customers  to your website, if they have a difficult time with the navigation?

If you are having difficulty getting your conversion rate up to where you would like, it could be an issue with website design. Part of the problem might be that your website design makes completing the path to a conversion overly tedious.

You can review this using the Google Analytics Users Flow report. The Users Flow report will show you how people are navigating through your website, starting with your landing page. You may see that prospective customers are getting distracted and clicking to pages that are not in your sales funnel. Use this information to redesign your landing pages and subsequent pages in the sales funnel to reduce drop off and increase the overall conversion rate of your Google Ads campaign.

Find Your Top Performing Audience Demographics & Interests

The Google Analytics demographics and interest reports can you give you great insight into your top performing audiences. Review these reports to see which audiences are performing best.

Then use the audience data to improve your Google Ads campaigns. Modify your demographic targeting, adjust bids, and even launch new campaigns to target the audiences you know perform best based on the Google Analytics data.

Summary

To be successful with Google Ads often requires using data that’s not available within the Google Ads reports. But one of the best sources of advertising performance-enhancing data is Google Analytics.

Review your landing page bounce rates to see how well you’re matching your landing page message to your ad copy. Use your Users Flow reports to see if your prospective customers are getting distracted on your website. And use your demographics and interests reports to improve the targeting in your Google Ads campaigns.

Want more tips to improve your Google Ads performance? Click here to grab a copy of our “Ultimate Google Ads” checklist.

 

 

What About Bing? A Guide to Understanding Microsoft Ads

Diversification is vital when it comes to long-term marketing success. Businesses that rely solely on one marketing channel are extremely vulnerable to competitors, shifts in customer preferences, and shifts in new technology. If all your eggs are in the Google Ads basket, then now is the time to consider Microsoft Ads.

Diversification is vital when it comes to long-term marketing success. Businesses that rely solely on one marketing channel are extremely vulnerable to competitors, shifts in customer preferences, and shifts in new technology.

If all your eggs are in the Google Ads basket, then now is the time to consider Microsoft Ads.

What Is Microsoft Advertising?

Microsoft Advertising, formerly Bing Ads, is the Bing search engine platform for PPC ad placement. Target audiences can see your ads in three different search engines — AOL, Bing, and Yahoo. Advertisers can have their campaigns viewed across those outlets, any sites owned by them, as well as partner sites.

Incorporating Microsoft Advertising into your PPC strategy expands your reach. The platform accounted for 25% of searches done using a desktop computer during June 2019. The number represents an additional 11 million searches outside of Google.

Understanding the Microsoft Advertising Platform

Microsoft Advertising has vastly expanded the array of tools offered since rebranding its former Bing Ads service. Here is an overview of those features and how they can be used to enhance your current marketing campaigns.

Targeted Ads

Ads on the Bing network can be geared toward specific audiences, thanks to the following targeting features of the Microsoft Ads platform.

  • Keywords — You can place bids on specific keywords and make changes based on conversion rates.
  • Scheduling — Microsoft Advertising allows you to time the display of your ads each day in 15-minute increments. Advertisers can also schedule ads to show up during business hours for their brick-and-mortar stores.
  • Demographics — You can design ads targeted at specific age groups and age ranges.
  • Location — You can target specific locations where your ads will be displayed and/or block locations from seeing your ads.

Shopping Campaigns

Microsoft Shopping Campaigns allow you to manage your product catalogs housed in the Microsoft Merchant center store. Product Ads include information about the product itself, an associated image, and any promotional text you may want to add. You can build them from scratch or import any Google campaigns you may have already built.

You can enhance the catalog feeds in your Microsoft Shopping Campaigns using the following attributes:

  • Product Category (max of five per offer)
  • Brand Name
  • Product Type
  • Condition of Product
  • Merchant Product Identifier (or Item ID)
  • Customized label (up to five per offer)

Microsoft Search Network

The Microsoft Search Network includes sites like MSN.com, Yahoo.com, and all other syndicated Microsoft and Yahoo partners. All search and audience ads are distributed across the network, aimed at your specific audiences.

Advertisers can narrow or expand the focus of their ads based on their current needs. You can choose to have campaigns seen everywhere or target a single channel. Microsoft Advertising also allows you to exclude your ads from being seen on partner websites.

AI Capabilities With Microsoft Audience Network

Microsoft tracks audience behavior patterns and uses that information to come up with new enhancements for advertisements while giving you a brand-safe environment. The Microsoft Graph visualization tool allows advertisers to view datasets and other information for better insight into the performance of various campaigns.

Advantages of Microsoft Advertising

Ads displayed on the Microsoft Search Network tend to attract an older audience, with 40% of those responding in the 35- to 54-year-old demographic. It’s an essential factor, because that age group accounts for nearly 75% of Bing users. Almost half the audience in that network makes at least $75,000 or more per year, making Microsoft Advertising an attractive prospect for those targeting high-wage earners.

Microsoft Ads campaigns tend to spend only a third of the amount that they would on a Google Ads campaign.

Why Bing

Microsoft Advertising allows you to diversify your PPC campaigns. Like Google Ads, it gives you control over your target audience and ad placements. Plus, Microsoft Advertising tends to cost less than Google Ads and will get your ads in front of an older, higher-earning audience.

Want more tips to improve your ad campaigns?  Click here to grab a copy of our “Ultimate Google Ads Checklist.”

Why You Are Missing Out Without Conversion Tracking

Which digital marketing channels are driving the most leads and sales for your business? Are any channels just wasting your budget? Without properly set up conversion tracking, there’s no way to answer those two critical questions.

How can you tell if your new Google Ads campaign is improving your conversion rate? What percentage of visitors coming to your landing pages are there because of your Facebook Ads? You can’t get an accurate assessment of the ROI generated by your advertising efforts without implementing mechanisms to track visitor responses.

What Is Conversion Tracking?

Conversion tracking involves placing a piece of code on your website to track visitors and their actions. The data helps you understand their responses to various techniques used in your ad campaigns and different webpage designs. You can use conversion tracking for testing of keywords, redesigned landing pages, and new ad text.

Items You Should Be Tracking

  • Forms on your website (ex. quote requests, scheduled appointments, demo requests)
  • E-commerce sales
  • Coupon codes you give out as a way of encouraging people to visit physical locations
  • Phone calls

Here is what you gain by effectively tracking your digital marketing efforts.

1. Better ROI Tracking

You can add tracking codes to “Thank You” pages to monitor completed transactions by visitors and origination channels. That can tell you how many of those conversions came from visitors who clicked on specific advertisements. You can include tracking of signups, lead generation, or other items relevant to improving ROI.

2. Insights Into Campaign Successes

Some ads will perform better than others. Conversion tracking tells you how well specific keywords perform in attracting your target audience. You can also learn which ad campaigns to eliminate if they tend to draw visitors who quickly move away from your landing pages. Use information gained from your split testing efforts to tweak your keyword lists, ad copy, and landing pages for better performance.

3. Figuring Out What Content to Reuse

You want to stick with what works. Conversion tracking lets you know which content on your website attracted the most interest, or which campaigns helped drive higher-quality visitors. You want content that keeps visitors on your site who will eventually convert into a lead or sale.

4. Improved Audience Categorization

Segmenting audiences allows you to provide relevant content to those who visit your site or sign up to receive your email communications. Conversion tracking helps you figure out whether you have your contacts properly sorted for the type of information they receive.

Better categorization means your audiences aren’t sending your emails directly to the trash bin, or worse, clicking the “report spam” and/or “Unsubscribe” link. You also increase your chances of attracting the type of attention that leads to more conversions and better ROI.

5. Knowledge of Where to Direct Marketing Budget

Marketers running campaigns on a limited budget must maximize each dollar spent, while being cost-efficient. That allows you to create more effective campaigns that get the most for your money. You avoid dumping money into failing ad strategies and can direct those funds to higher-performing efforts.

Why Conversion Tracking?

Conversion tracking allows you to track and improve the ROI of your digital marketing campaigns by helping you identify your best-performing campaigns and eliminate those not delivering the desired conversion rates. It also helps you understand where you should be directing your budget across all the various marketing channels so you maximize every dollar invested.

Want more help tracking your marketing campaigns?  Click here to grab a copy of our “Ultimate Google Analytics Checklist.”

3 Tips For Optimizing Your Ad Bid Strategy

The journey toward finding the perfect ad bid strategy for your PPC campaign can seem almost torturous at times. You continually test your CTAs, raise and lower your budgets, obsess over whether you are using the right keywords, images, etc.

The journey toward finding the perfect ad bid strategy for your PPC campaign can seem almost torturous at times. You continually test your CTAs, raise and lower your budgets, obsess over whether you are using the right keywords, images, etc. The constant fiddling can leave ad managers feeling like a hamster running on a wheel leading nowhere.

There is no magic formula for coming up with the perfect bid every single time. You can increase your odds of achieving your target KPIs for your ads by refining your tactics. Below are a few ideas you might want to incorporate into your PPC ad bid strategies, going forward.

1. Make Sure Automated Bids Are Right for You

Most ad bidding novices find it easier to use Google Ads automated bidding strategies. They set up bids based on varying factors and your set budget. That leads many new bidders to conclude that relying on automation for bids is a safer bet than trying to manage their accounts manually. There are instances, however, where manual bids can pay off in a more significant way.

  • When You Have Low Conversion Volumes If an account has low conversion volumes, there will not be a lot of raw data available. That means the automated bidding won’t have the information needed to make the best decisions. The algorithms can jump to conclusions that end up hurting your overall conversion rate. It is a much better strategy to place manual bids until you have at least 45 to 60 conversions under your belt.
  • When You Have a Limited Budget You need budget flexibility to maximize the benefits of automated bids.
  • When You Have PPC Experience Start doing your homework and gain experience placing bids. That makes it easier to respond to rapid changes with manual bids, instead of letting the automated bids take care of everything. You can end up gaining better results for campaigns that may be too complex for the current algorithms to process.

2. Go After In-Market Audiences

An in-market audience consists of those who have already done extensive research into a specific product. They know what they want and have moved further down the marketing funnel. Attracting clicks from in-market audiences allows you to collect more refined details around their behavior. You also have an advantage in that you know exactly what type of ads you must build to attract their attention.

Try out a few audiences to see how they perform. Once you gain a firmer understanding of the in-market audience, start testing out different ad variations. Then raise or lower bids depending on how well they end up performing when it comes to actual conversions.

3. Add Your Brand

With so much competition online today, it’s easy to lose out on business even when prospective customers are searching your brand name. That’s why most businesses should be bidding on their brand keywords.

You can enhance the effectiveness of a branded search campaign by making sure to feature your brand name in your ad headline. That puts your brand directly in the minds of consumers who are searching for you. Otherwise, they might end up scrolling past your ad to a competitor or a website from the organic search results.

Test out adding your brand to your ad Headline 1 vs. Headline 2 or in the body of your copy. You should start to see better clickthrough rates and conversion rates when you include your brand information front-and-center. It pays to put yourself forward in the minds of consumers as much as possible with so much digital competition for your audience’s attention.

Summary

PPC bid strategies can be confusing for both novice and professional advertisers. It might pay off more to manually place bids vs. relying on algorithms to automate your bids.

Research in-market audiences to find prospective customers who have already researched your product or service and are more likely ready to buy. Plus, complement your overall branding strategy by including the brand name in your ad headline.

Want more tips to improve your ad campaigns? Click here to grab a copy of our “Ultimate Google Ads Checklist.”

6 Google Ads Trends You Should Be Using in Your Marketing

Google Ads, formerly AdWords, has been a mainstay of PPC marketing since its introduction in 2000. Businesses now have access to new tools that allow them to refine their PPC marketing and generate more leads. Make sure your campaigns are taking advantage of the most popular Google Ads trends.

Google Ads, formerly AdWords, has been a mainstay of PPC marketing since its introduction in 2000. A lot has changed over the last 19 years, and businesses now have access to new tools that allow them to refine their PPC marketing and generate more leads. Make sure your campaigns are taking advantage of 2019’s most popular Google Ads trends.

2019 Google Ads Trends

1. Personalization

Personalizing your Google Ads means relying on the insights gleaned from your visitors to refine your ads toward specific audiences. Learn to match ads back to specific landing pages, which lets your visitors understand the relevancy of the page relating to the ad they just clicked. That helps reinforce the impact of your branding strategy, along with your message.

Use tools like geo customizers that pinpoint a visitor’s location or a place they are looking to visit. You can also upload your lists of emails into Google’s Customer Match product to help direct ads from your campaign at specific audiences.

2. Optimize for Voice Search

With 55% of households expected to own some speech-enabled device, voice search must be accounted for when designing your ads for campaigns. When users issue commands into apps powered by Alexa or Siri, they speak in more natural patterns that do not conform to standard keyword patterns.

Instead of keywords, center ad content around accurately responding to user questions. If they ask, “Where is the nearest Mexican restaurant,” ads that highlight Mexican cuisine near their location should be what appear. Clarity takes precedent over conciseness when it comes to voice search.

That does not mean that marketers should abandon keywords entirely. They should, however, focus on longer-tailed keywords that allow for more natural phrasing. Keywords no longer have to fall into a specific pattern, thanks to the advancement in algorithms used by Google.

3. Write for Your Audience, Not Keywords

The Google Ads interface now allows you to drill down and target audiences based on demographics, the reason why they may be making a purchase, and many other patterns. That means leaning less on keywords and more on gearing your ads toward items of interest to your audience.

With the array of tools now at a marketer’s disposal, keywords will decrease in importance, making it vital that marketers put in the work to truly understand what their visitors desire. That will help them design better quality ads that can elevate their conversion rates.

4. Make Use of Smart Campaigns

Google Ads users now have the option of creating “Smart Campaigns.” They simplify ad creation by making it easier for marketers and small businesses to target specific audiences. You include the address of your business, images, and other information into Google Ads templates that automatically accounts for your CTR and CVR.

Google algorithms take over and locate audiences fitting your information. You keep your volumes growing without having to do a lot of hands-on configuration.

5. Gear Ads Toward Remarketing

You can keep visitors interested in your site offerings by designing ads full of products or services in which they expressed interest. It is a matter of adding a small piece of code to your website that captures information about your visitor’s attention. You can use that information to create ads aimed at bringing them back to your site.

6. Tie Ads Back to In-Store Offerings

Localizing your Google Ads can help drive customers into your physical stores. Many people do research online when looking for goods or services. Design ads that feature inventory in your store and whether you currently have it in stock. That can motivate customers to go ahead and visit your store to make a purchase.

Summing It All Up

  • Personalize your ads to appeal to specific audiences
  • Account for voice search when designing ads
  • Think beyond keywords when creating ads for your audience
  • Maximize the benefits of Google Ads Smart Campaigns
  • Build ads targeted at previous visitors to your website
  • Use Google Ads to promote your in-store offerings.

Keep an eye out for more changes to Google Ads that will likely impact your campaigns for 2020.

How Tech-Savvy Kids Are Wrecking the Effectiveness of Google Ad Campaigns

Are your Google ad campaigns being wasted on kids accidentally clicking ads on their mobile phones? If you’re targeting Google’s Display network, then there’s a good chance you’re wasting a lot of your ad budget. Learn how to put an end to this today.

If you were a kid during the ’80s or the early part of the ’90s, you likely didn’t realize that you were the last of your kind. Every generation of kids going forward will, outside of an apocalyptic event, never know a world not driven by technology. When creating your Google ad campaigns, think about how often you see kids as young as five or six absorbed in playing games or watching videos on a mobile device.

What does any of this have to do with your meticulously crafted Google Ads? If they end up running on the same apps on which those kids spend a lot of their time, plenty.

How Mobile Apps Throw Off Your Numbers

The Display Network provides the capability of allowing your ad to reach 93% of online users. That includes websites, videos, and apps. The potential created can be limitless, but so can the damage that can be wrought by your ad’s inclusion in a mobile application.

It makes sense for marketers to have their ads seen on websites relevant to their product, and that is where Google Ads can be of real benefit. The problem comes in when those same ads appear in the latest version of a child’s favorite mobile game.

The Fat Finger Problem

Think about your actions when playing a game on your phone or some other mobile device. The only ads you will click on are those appealing to your interests, and you likely close the rest. Sometimes your finger placement is wrong, and you end up accidentally clicking through an ad.

Those accidental clicks go up exponentially when children close out ads. All those accidental clicks fool you into thinking you are getting lots of interest in your product, thanks to strategic ad placement. That makes it hard to measure the effectiveness of your campaigns and figure out where you may want to make changes.

How to Avoid Miscounting Random Clicks From Mobile Apps

The following steps outline how you can examine your campaigns and see where your ads are placed.

  1. Select a specific ad campaign from your Google Ads dashboard.
  2. Click “Placements” from the left navigation sidebar.
  3. Click “Where Ads Showed” from the top navigation.

You should see a listing of previous ad placements for that campaign. Enter “mobile” into the search box to narrow the results down to mobile apps.

Excluding Mobile Apps

The Google Ads platform gives you the ability to opt out of having your ads displayed within mobile applications. You can do this by:

  • Clicking the checkbox to the left of the placement, then
  • Clicking “Edit” and
  • Selecting “Exclude from ad group” or “Exclude from campaign.”
  • Next, click “Exclusions” from the top navigation to view all the placements you’re excluded from.
  • Click the blue edit button to add more to campaigns or ad groups.

A Matter of Money

Business owners can benefit the most from completely excluding their ads from all mobile applications. The extraneous clicks could end up costing them quite a bit, as they will not result in the desired conversion.

They can do this by adding “App categories > All Apps” to the Exclusions list within your Display network campaigns.

Pulling It All Together

Not all clicks lead to the promise of a conversion, especially unintentional ones done by kids on mobile apps. You can review your ad placements in the Google Ads platform by clicking on the “Placements” button in the left navigation sidebar.  This will show you the placements you’re targeting.  Click “Where Ads Showed” to see where else your ads were displayed and determine if you need to exclude any of those additional placements.

Most businesses should exclude “All Apps” to save yourself a lot of headaches and reporting issues.

Want more tips to improve your Google Ads campaigns? Get your free copy of our “Ultimate Google AdWords Checklist.”

 

Understanding Your Google Ads Metrics With the Latest Interface

How do you know what the metrics in Google Ads mean and which ones matter the most? The latest version of Google Ads’ interface has a particularly large number of metrics, so it’s easy to get overwhelmed when you first log on.

How do you know what the metrics in Google Ads mean and which ones matter the most? The latest version of Google Ads’ interface has a particularly large number of metrics, so it’s easy to get overwhelmed when you first log on.

Each page has a table full of data, including a graph of metrics and various reports. It’s a little like looking at an airplane cockpit for the first time, with all its lights, switches and gauges. However, experienced advertisers know that all the information in Google Ads allows you to dig into your campaign performance and find ways to improve it.

Which Metrics Really Matter?

The most important Google Ads metrics include the following:

  • Cost-per-click (CPC)
  • Clickthrough rate (CTR)
  • Conversion rate
  • Cost-per-acquisition (CPA)

CPC

CPC is an advertising model in which an advertiser pays a website owner each time a user clicks on an ad. First-tier search engines like Google Ads typically use a CPC model, because advertisers can bid on key phrases that are relevant to their target market. In comparison, content sites typically charge per 1,000 impressions of the ad.

CTR

CTR, or clickthrough rate, is the ratio of users who click a link to the total number of users who view the ad. CTR generally indicates a marketing campaign’s effectiveness in attracting visitors to a website.

Conversion Rate

Conversion rate is the ratio of goal achievements to the number of visitors. It’s essentially the proportion of visitors who take a desired action as a result of your marketing activity. The specific action that a conversion rate monitors depends on the type of business you’re promoting. For example, online retailers often define a conversion as a sale, while services businesses consider other actions, such as a request for a quote, a demo sign up or a report download, when measuring conversion rate.

CPA

CPA, or cost per action, is the total cost of your ads divided by the number of conversions. Again, the specific action depends on the type of business you’re promoting. For example, CPA for online retailers is typically the cost per e-commerce sale. Services businesses typically measure CPA as a cost per lead. This number is critical, because it tells you if your campaigns are profitable or not.

How Can Metrics Help You Improve Performance?

Poor metrics can indicate courses of action that can help you improve your Google Ads campaign performance.

CPC

A high CPC could mean that you need to raise the quality scores for your ad, which could reduce the cost of each click. You can also accomplish this by using ad scheduling and geotargeting to ensure your website doesn’t show ads during times or in locations where you don’t do business. Additional strategies for reducing CPC include using demographic targeting, in-market audiences and remarketing to narrow your audience to just the people who are interested in your business.

CTR

A low CTR can indicate that you need to review the keywords and ad copy in your Google Ads account. For example, you should ensure that you’re only bidding on keywords that relate to your offers. You should also perform A/B testing on your ads to determine the factors that interest your prospects the most, whether it’s features, benefits or some emotional trigger. You can also improve CTR by ensuring that your ad takes up as much room as possible by implementing ad extensions.

Conversion Rate

A low conversion rate can indicate that you need to take a closer look at your landing pages, where visitors go when they click on an ad. These pages should be very clean and quick to load to ensure visitors don’t lose interest after they click. Your ads should always send visitors directly to a dedicated landing page, rather than just your home page or even a general landing page.

CPA

A high CPA means that you aren’t getting a good return on investment (ROI) from your ad spend. Possible causes of a high CPA include a high CPC or low conversion rate, which often means a poor choice of keywords and ad copy. Concentrate your budget on high-converting keywords with a high intent to buy.

Conclusion

Google Ads provides many metrics that can tell you how to improve website performance. However, this information can also be daunting to interpret if you don’t know what it means.  Follow the tips above to monitor your key metrics and make adjustments to improve your Google Ads performance.

Want more tips to improve your Google advertising? Get your free copy of our “Ultimate Google AdWords Checklist.”