10 Self-Marketing Tips for Job-Seeking Marketing Grads

I’ve been informally coaching my undergrad business school students on how to prepare for the business world they’ll face while job-seeking in just 1.5 years. They have some work experience, usually as interns. When it comes to presenting themselves in a business context, they are pretty green.

I’ve been informally coaching my undergrad business school students on how to prepare for the business world they’ll face while job-seeking in just 1.5 years. They have some work experience, usually as interns. When it comes to presenting themselves in a business context, they are pretty green.

But they’re eager and ambitious, so I decided to compile a set of tips to help them get ready.

I’d appreciate comments and additions from colleagues on these:

  1. Find a Local Professional Association in your area of interest — whether industry or job function. Join as a student member, and volunteer to help with a committee.
  2. Use All 120 Characters Available for Your LinkedIn Headline, and pack it with keywords about your skills. Finance, analytics, big data, strategy — use the terms hiring managers are looking for.
  3. Write Your LinkedIn Bio With Your Goal in Mind. Who are you trying to persuade? If it’s to attract job offers, then emphasize your skills, attitude and drive. Talk about contributions you made during internships. Declare your ideal industry and job function.
  4. Use a Professional Photo. Seems obvious, but surprisingly many LinkedIn members use shots more suited to Facebook.
  5. Clean Up Your Social Media. Take down photos and delete comments from your younger days that may make you look undesirable as an employee.
  6. Practice Your Elevator Speech. Come up with a few sentences that identify your situation and your goals. Add in a personal or professional twist to stimulate interest. Once you have it down, then start practicing ways to adjust your speech on the fly, depending on the audience.
  7. Buy Your Name as a Domain, and use it for your professional email address.
  8. Start Building Your Professional Network. Begin with your classmates, teachers and guest speakers. Add people you meet at your internships. Send out LinkedIn invitations, and also maintain a database of contacts. Keep in touch.
  9. If You’re Not a Natural Joiner, then find other ways to position yourself. Try writing a guest blog post. Follow writers on business subjects of interest to you, and actively comment on their posts.
  10. Think Ahead. You are in college now, but in the business world before you know it. Take steps early, and often, to position yourself for a satisfying career.

A version of this article appeared in Biznology, the digital marketing blog.

Advice for GenZ Marketing Job Seekers and Hiring Managers

If you’re looking to hire new graduates, learn who the best candidates are by networking with their college professors. My former partner, Jon Roska, brought the best and the brightest college grads into the agency every year by networking with professors at local universities.

There’s a story I tell to my students about getting their first job.

Former University of Pennsylvania President Judith Rodin was addressing the graduating class of 2003 and started a litany of the important things the graduates learned during their time at the university:

At Penn you learned this, at Penn you learned that, at Penn you learned this, at Penn you learned that, “but most importantly, at Penn you learned that it is not WHO you know, but rather WHOM you know.”

Grammatically correct, but also valuable advice for job seekers and hiring managers alike.

Advice for Job-Seekers

I encourage students to start their job networking while they’re still in school. Go to industry events. Meet people. Connect with people who can introduce you to prospective opportunities in their own firms, as well as in related companies. Build a strong network on LinkedIn and don’t be shy about using it to get introduced to job opportunities. When jobs become available, hiring managers are more likely to hire someone they already know, or someone who’s been referred by someone they know, rather than a stranger.

Advice for Marketing Team Hiring Managers

This advice applies to hiring managers, as well. If you’re looking to hire new graduates, learn who the best candidates are by networking with their college professors. My former partner, Jon Roska, brought the best and the brightest college grads into the agency every year by networking with professors at local universities. It was a win for everyone: the professors, the students and the agency.

Many colleges hold job fairs for their graduating seniors and invite prospective employers to set up shop and meet their graduating students. These events are a great way for students and managers to meet each other, but tapping into a network of teachers who have gotten to know which students are the best during a 15-week course is an excellent way to screen for the cream of the crop.

It’s all about whom you know.