14 Quick Takeaways From #IMV16, ICYMI

We’ve already arrived in August, and this has been one busy whirlwind of a summer. Between major elections, summer vacations and Pokemon catching, we’ve all had our hands full. Point being, it’s entirely possible you missed out on some quality, free marketing education.

We’ve already arrived in August, and this has been one busy whirlwind of a summer. Between major elections, summer vacations and Pokemon catching, we’ve all had our hands full. Personally, I can’t focus on anything for longer than an hour until I finally get my hands on a Jigglypuff. (Millennials, amirite guys?)

Point being, it’s entirely possible you missed out on some quality, free marketing education. You might remember I wrote a little about the Integrated Marketing Virtual Conference, an event near and dear to my heart, in a post a few weeks ago. The virtual conference in all its expert marketing glory was live on June 23, and now you can access it on demand whenever your schedule clears up until September 27.

In the meantime, I took to the Tweets and compiled some of the best little nuggets of integrated marketing goodness that show attendees took from the numerous sessions and resources offered throughout the day. Ready for some lightning round takeaways and tips? Here goes!

  • Be more responsive than customers expect to create a great customer experience. -Jay Baer #imv2016 #IMV16 — Melyssa, ABC (‏@melyssa57)  June 23, 2016
  • Hug Your Haters! 1/3 of customer complaints are never answered. #IMV16 @TargetMktg — Kendra Morton ‏(@KendraAtAllCom) June 23, 2016
  • A great #customerexperience = exceeding customer expectations. #IMV16 @jaybaer — Polaris Direct ‏(@PolarisDirect) June 23, 2016
  • Kicking off #imv16 by learning about organization haters. Need to answer every complaint in every channel, every time to + customer advocacy — KathyDanielsPearman ‏(@kathyldaniels) June 23, 2016
  • Most customer complaints on social media go unanswered. “Blow their minds and win their hearts” #HugYourHaters @jayBaer #IMV16 #IMV16 — Dani (‏@danidoll11) June 23, 2016
  • 80% of Americans trust online reviews as much as personal recommendations, via @jaybaer #IMV16 — Daniel Burstein (@DanielBurstein) June 23, 2016
  • Avg time it takes for a company to reply to complaints on #socialmedia is 5 hrs, but users expect 1 @jaybaer #IMV16 — Sales&Marketing Adv (@SalesMktgAdv) June 23, 2016

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  • “Customer service is a spectator sport” … so follow @jaybaer’s rule and don’t feed the #trolls #IMV16 – Nancy Simeone ‏(@100indecisions) June 23, 2016

dontfeedthetrolls

  • [#digitalmarketing] Answering a complaint online can increase customer advocacy by 25%. #IMV16 – Cyfer Solutions ‏(@cyfersolutions) June 23, 2016
  • Solid #marketing intel with @DanielBurstein from @MECLABS. Finding the gaps and exploiting the heck outta them! #IMV16 #IMV16 – Mary Rose Maguire ‏(@MRMaguire) June 23, 2016  
  • Great information about bridging the gap between #marketing and customer expectations in #IMV16. – Kimberly Weitkamp ‏(@k_weitkamp) June 23, 2016
  • According to @annebot at #IMV16, most people start scrolling on mobile before the page loads. – mobilefomo ‏(@mobilefomo)  June 23, 2016
  • Speed is king when it comes to mobile; if you put in the time, you will reap the rewards. -@annebot #IMV16 – WearableFOMO ‏(@WearableFOMO)  June 23, 2016
  • Your content needs to DRIVE customer experiences to truly be successful (and with that comes so much more!) #IMV16 – Sass Marketing ‏(@Sass_Marketing)  June 23, 2016

There you have it, a fresh sampling of marketing granola, perfect for the pro on the go. And hey, when you have an hour or two of downtime from hunting that Geodude or counting how many Pokemon references the media can make in a week (Spoiler: don’t bother, the limit does not exist), you can check out the full show and all its sessions for yourself.

The agenda is full of more than a dozen webinars covering all the marketing topics on your mind in 2016, led by cream of the crop experts. There’s also a fully stocked virtual exhibit hall and resource center, where you’ll find tons of free resources you can download for immediate use.

Go on and have a little click. Totally worth it, I promise you. Let me know if you check it out, or tweet your takeaways with the #IMV16 hashtag to add to the growing pile.

Till next time!

How to Handle Haters

It happens. You do your best to satisfy your customers, to deliver on all of your promises, provide great customer service and create CRM: Customer Relationship Magic. … And then someone starts to complain. Maybe you screwed up and the complaints are justified. Maybe it’s a malcontent. Maybe it’s a loon. How do you handle them?

It happens. You do your best to satisfy your customers, to deliver on all of your promises, provide great customer service and create what Denny Hatch used to call CRM: Customer Relationship Magic. … And then someone starts to complain.

Maybe you screwed up and the complaints are justified. Maybe it’s a malcontent. Maybe it’s a loon. How do you handle them?

Me, I was brought up old school …

To crush your enemies, see them driven before you and hear the lamentation of their women.
That’s “Conan The Barbarian” from 1982, which makes him a Millennial.

But maybe that isn’t the best attitude to bring into customer service. I’ve been reading Jay Baer’s “Hug Your Haters,” which offers a warmer, fuzzier approach to handling these bad-wishers by not treating them like enemies at all. (To be fair, most Internet complainers are out of sword range anyway.)

The 2 Types of Haters

Hug Your Haters, Jay BaerBaer starts with the well-researched assertion that there are two types of complainers.

  • Offstage Haters: Complain to the company in person via a channel like phone, email or direct chat, and want to have their issues addressed. They want an answer.
  • Onstage Haters: Almost always complain publicly via social media, review sites, forums or other public channels, and they don’t necessarily expect a response. They want an audience.

For most companies, most complainers are still in the first category. But the second group is younger and growing fast. In fact, Baer notes that social media itself is making complaining publicly far easier. Specifically, social media makes shallow complaints easier. The kind of post a person might make in a minute, then spend the rest of the day on it, exchanging heated comments with friends.

“When delivered online and in public, a lot of what we call complaints would be classified as a comment if delivered offline, if delivered at all,” says Baer in the book. “Annoyances that formerly would have qualified for an inner monologue of ‘oh, that sucks’ now spur a ‘oh, that sucks and I should share it with the world.'”

Not only do onstage haters complain more easily, they complain more vehemently, upping the rhetoric against the company in order to break through the social media clutter and get that attention.

And, as you saw in Dani Cantor’s post last week, often onstage complainers don’t even want you to reply.

According to Baer, both offstage and onstage haters offer opportunities to brands who understand what they want, and how and when to answer them. He’s created a sort of matrix, called “The Hatrix,” of what you can expect from both kinds of haters based on where they complain and how you respond.

Jay Baer's The Hatrix from Hug Your HatersHow to Hug Your Haters

How exactly do you hug these potentially prickly people? That gets complicated. It depends on the channel they’ve complained in. On some channels, it’s as simple as making a reply comment. On others, you need to take steps to get into direct contact, or find another way to bridge the gap.

“The Hug Your Haters approach is to answer every complaint, in every channel, every time,” says Baer. Even though he acknowledges that it “almost never happens.” There are just too many obstacles for most businesses to deliver on that promise.

The solution he offers are two “playbooks.” One for dealing with offstage haters, and the other for dealing with onstage haters.

For offstage haters, the playbook is “HOURS.”

  • Human (act like one)
  • One Channel
  • Unify Your Data
  • Resolve the Issue
  • Speed (resolve it quickly)

For onstage haters, the playbook is “FEARS.”

  • Find All Mentions
  • Empathy (show it to the complainer)
  • Answer Publicly
  • Reply Only Once
  • Switch Channels

Next Steps

Those are the broad strokes of a very in-depth strategy for dealing with haters. How does that compare to how you handle your haters at your own company? Are you seeing more offstage haters or onstage?

For more on the situation and the strategies, check out Jay Baer’s book, “Hug Your Haters.”

And if you’d like to hear it from Jay Baer himself, be sure to catch the Integrated Marketing Virtual Conference, where he’ll be the opening keynote speaker. Baer will be discussing all of these topics and more live during the session!