Assessing the USPS January Rate Hike – Start the Clock

While we still wait for the Senate Homeland and Governmental Affairs Committee to move forward with a meaningful postal reform bill (the vote to mark it up has been postponed), the Postal Regulatory Commission provided some very tough news for mailers to swallow just ahead of Christmas Day

While we still wait for the Senate Homeland and Governmental Affairs Committee to move forward with a meaningful postal reform bill (the vote to mark it up has been postponed), the Postal Regulatory Commission provided some very tough news for mailers to swallow just ahead of Christmas Day.

By a two-to-one decision, the PRC concluded that the United States Postal Service, on its second attempt to do so, did offer enough evidence that the Great Recession (2007-2009) did help generate two years of financial losses to create an “exigency” scenario—and protestations and counter evidence that volume and revenue decreases were created by other means (digital migration, Congressional mandates and such) were not enough by mailer and business groups to prevail and reject the exigency claim. Now mailers will have to suck it up—or go elsewhere with their marketing dollars, come January 25. That is when the annual Consumer Price Index-capped increase plus the exigency increase in postage is slated to take effect. Ouch!

Well, due process and due diligence had its day—a dismal one for mailers—and now a real-life experiment will happen. What will the two-year “exigency” rate hike of 4.3 percent—three times the rate of inflation when added to the already-slated CPI hike—do to marketing mail trends this time around?

When the 2007 postage increase took effect, the results were devastating for flats mailers, who endured an unexpected punishing increase.

“The 2007 rate increase was the real culprit for flats volume declines,” said Hamilton Davison, president and executive director of the American Catalogers Mailers Association, recently. “The recession didn’t help either, but the pullback in volume from catalog mailers, for one, was dramatic. Some of our wounds in growing our own businesses have been self-inflicted. Typically mail order businesses have 40 percent to 70 percent of their total mail volume dedicated to new customer prospecting. After the 2007 rate hike, that was cut to near zero. When you stop prospecting, sooner or later your own house file of customers deteriorates due to attrition. But by that time, a vicious cycle occurs, where there are too few new names to mail. The universe of mailable names has declined, and that is hurting the catalog industry just as the economy has been improving.”

Will such a similar outcome happen now that First-Class and Standard Mailers are facing a total, and unexpected, rate hike of 6% in less than 30 days? Like it or not, the clock starts now and we shall see. For some marketers, I fear, enough is enough. And meaningful postal reform still waits in the wings.

A Possible USPS ‘Exigent’ Rate Increase – Playing Politics on the Backs of Ratepayers?

There are rumors that the USPS may request another exigent rate increase. Why are we going through this again? Advertisers, marketers and the business community love certainty—and have a strong distaste for uncertainty. When one considers the financial situation of the U.S. Postal Service during the past couple of years, it’s enough to keep mailers at bay in planning their ad budgets, and keep them from devoting much to direct mail in the overall media mix.

There are rumors that the USPS may request another exigent rate increase. Why are we going through this again?

Advertisers, marketers and the business community love certainty—and have a strong distaste for uncertainty. When one considers the financial situation of the U.S. Postal Service during the past couple of years—from uncertain prospects of postal reform legislative efforts, to what any emerging postal reform effort might contain or not contain in cost savings, to short-term financial viability and this past year’s default—it’s enough to keep mailers at bay in planning their ad budgets, and keep them from devoting much to direct mail in the overall media mix.

Tying postage increases to the consumer price index and giving USPS the latitude to implement such increases annually (as is now the law) has helped give the business community certainty about postage costs, so they can plan and budget accordingly.

Allowing an “exigent” or additional postage increase to happen when there are extraordinary circumstances (as is also now the law) was intended as a “last resort” to make Postal Service finances whole. Let’s be honest: An extraordinary circumstance happens when there is an absence of postal reform efforts moving forward, and, possibly, when there is an absence of U.S. economic growth and an exhaustion of wise cost containment initiatives inside the Postal Service. All three of these latter scenarios don’t exist—so why even consider an exigent increase?

It’s a bad idea. First, USPS customers would detest such a rate hike, as they do. It’s an uncertainty.

Recently the Direct Marketing Association (DMA) in its Direct from Washington newsletter reported:

With reason to believe that the United States Postal Service (USPS) Board of Governors may vote on a potential exigency rate increase in early September, the Affordable Mail Alliance (AMA), including the DMA, sent a letter to the Governors voicing their opposition of such an increase. The letter expressed concern about the negative effects that would come with such an increase, especially for the mailing industry and its suppliers. The letter recognized the continued financial struggles that confront USPS, but also stated that an exigent rate increase is not the solution to those struggles. With recent progress toward comprehensive postal reform in Congress, along with steady improvement in the USPS balance sheet, the letter stated that an exigency filing ‘at this point would be premature.’ The letter additionally requested a meeting with the Board to discuss the issues at hand and to ensure that USPS is fully informed before making a decision of such great magnitude.

Second, if the architects of an exigent rate hike think that such a case is what is needed to convince lawmakers that postal finances are indeed a mess, and that a reform law—now in discussion—is desperately needed to fix them, then how dare play politics on the backs of ratepayers? An exigent rate hike is unlikely to move best-case legislation forward (and may even help move a bad bill, from customers’ perspective) and will saddle mailers with even higher costs than budgeted. Thus, there would be more uncertainty and more mail dollars flowing elsewhere in advertising.

As the Affordable Mail Alliance contends, any exigency scenarios are at best premature and, might I add, most likely non-existent. So USPS, please listen to your customers and just don’t go there.