Hey, Lawmaker: Marketing Moves Today’s Commerce, and Data Moves Today’s Marketing

Members of Congress, and even the White House, seem to forget or ignore that their very own campaigns depended on the flow of information about citizens and individuals and population segments to inform their campaigns. Their respective elections prove that data and marketing in concert are very effective, especially for incumbents. Yet listen to a few among our leaders, and you’d think data-driven marketing is a consumer privacy problem begging for a government solution

I’ll start this blog off with a disclosure: I’m a member of the Direct Marketing Association, serve and have served on various DMA committees, and I count the Digital Advertising Alliance and other data-driven marketing firms among my clients. In short, my livelihood depends on data-driven marketing.

Members of Congress, and even the White House, in good measure, seem to forget or ignore that their very own elections to office depended on the flow of information about citizens and individuals and population segments to inform their campaigns. Their respective elections prove that data and marketing in concert are very effective, especially for incumbents.

Yet listen to a few among our leaders, and you’d think data-driven marketing is a consumer privacy problem begging for a government solution. How they (some of them) ignore 40+ years of self-regulation success in data-driven marketing; U.S. leadership in information technology and its data-driven marketing application (they are not coincidental); and the economic powerhouse of jobs, sales and tax revenue that is created by data exchange for marketing purposes.

Research Proves Our Case … Again
In November, DMA and its Data-Driven Marketing Institute announced “The Value of Data” Study (opens as a pdf), which documented the economic impact: The data-driven marketing economy added $156 billion in revenue to the U.S. economy that fueled more than 675,000 jobs in 2012 alone. (Importantly, the study also provides state-by-state economic impact.) The full study is available here.

This past week, DAA announced results of its own commissioned research which focused on the value of digital advertising derived from data exchange—and its comparison to general ads online. The study reported that availability of cookies to facilitate information transfer increases the average impression price paid by advertisers by 60 percent to 200 percent. Additionally, ads for which cookie-related information was available sold for three-to-seven times higher than ads without cookies. Thus, the invisible hand of the market, once again, proves data’s value. The full study is available at http://www.aboutads.info/resource/fullvalueinfostudy.pdf.

We’ve Got Work to Do … with our Lawmakers
Yet President Barack Obama and Sens. Jay Rockefeller (D-WV) and Ed Markey (D-MA) might have Americans believe that National Security Agency surveillance of U.S. citizens, data breaches at retailers and other organizations, and data exchange to drive marketing is one big roll-up of the same issue.

We know they are not. Spying by government on its own citizens is an important civil liberty issue, and while I’m not a fan of Snowden hiding out, NSA revelations deserve a full debate on its own merits and threats. Data security extends far beyond marketing—and marketers and many lawmakers agree that we need one national data protection and breach notification standard (and not 50+1). Data-driven marketing is not a problem at all, but instead a huge boon to U.S. marketing success that depends on continued innovation and fair use of information principles, which deserves government support (or at least government staying out of the way).

Importing restrictive laws and regimes on data flows for marketing has the potential to ruin American commerce by killing relevance. At a time when consumers are becoming more skeptical of brands, the intelligent use of information to converse with consumers with resonance is a requirement of marketing smart today. Dumb marketing wastes resources, annoys consumers and frankly places us at a disadvantage globally. While culture around regions of the world is unique, I believe our sector-specific approach to privacy regulation based on consumer harm potential (credit, health, financial) is superior to omnibus privacy law (all personal data is the same) and has served our economy well. How terrible to find we have our own lawmakers who seem to fail to grasp the evidence. You can believe DMA, DAA and other advertising organizations are working hard to show policymakers the great value we create in the marketing profession.

Politicians sense moods … and read polling. In my next blog post, I’ll look at some of the perception challenges we face with consumers. Clearly, as much as consumers “consume,” marketing is not all that popular with some of them either. We have work to do with consumers, too.

Prospecting to IT Buyers: How Nine Data Vendors Stack Up

Buyers of information technology (IT) are one of the most valued audiences targeted by business marketers. Globally, these professionals spend $3.6 trillion on hardware, software and technology services. My colleague Bernice Grossman and I recently investigated the availability of prospecting data available to tech marketers for reaching this desirable group, and we found some surprises.

Buyers of information technology (IT) are one of the most valued audiences targeted by business marketers. Globally, these professionals spend $3.6 trillion on hardware, software and technology services. My colleague Bernice Grossman and I recently investigated the availability of prospecting data available to tech marketers for reaching this desirable group, and we found some surprises.

We asked twenty companies who supply prospecting data to business marketers to share with us statistics about the quantity and quality of the data they have on IT buyers in the U.S. Nine vendors graciously participated in our study-specifically, Data.com, D&B, Harte-Hanks, Infogroup, Mardev-DM2, NetProspex, Stirista, Worldata and ZoomInfo. Our thanks to them for letting us poke around under their hoods.

We asked each participating vendor to report to us on the number of companies on their databases in ten industries, by SIC code. We also asked for the numbers of contacts with IT titles in a sampling of twenty firms in those SICs, ten large enterprises and ten small businesses. Finally, we sent them the names and addresses of ten actual IT professionals (people whom Bernice and I happen to know, and were able to persuade to let us submit their names), and we asked the vendors to share with us the exact record they have on those individuals. The results of our study can be downloaded here.

This is the same methodology we have used in past studies on prospecting data available to business marketers—although this was the first study we have done on a particular industry vertical. Our objective is, first, to get at the question of coverage, meaning, the extent to which a business marketer can gain access to all the companies and contacts in the target market. And second, we want to show marketers the level of accuracy in the data available for prospecting-for example, is Joe Schmoe still the CIO at Acme Widgets, and can I get his correct phone number and email address?

The answers to these questions, in general, was YES. The data reported was surprisingly accurate, especially given how much business marketers complain about the data they get from vendors. And the coverage was wide, meaning there seem to be plenty of IT names in a variety of industries for us to contact.

But the data also revealed some interesting trends in business marketing in general and tech marketing in specific.

  • Prospecting data is being sold these days out of massive databases, which makes it far easier for marketers to select exactly the targets they want, by such criteria as title, company size and industry, irrespective of whether a “compiled” or a “response” name.
  • Company counts by SIC varied widely among the vendors, reminding us that data providers may have their own proprietary systems for flagging a company by industry code.
  • Job titles are getting fuzzier than ever. We found real IT professionals using titles such as Platform Manager and Reporting Manager-which makes it tough to know what they really do.

Given these developments, we urge our fellow marketers to probe carefully on data sourcing and categorizing practices, and to specify in great detail exactly what targets you’re going after, when buying data for new customer acquisition. And we suggest that you source from multiple vendors, in order to expand your market coverage potential. Happy prospecting to all.

Addressing the Skills Gap: 5 Reasons Why Year-End Giving Should Include a DMEF Donation

The uncertain domestic and global economy masks a glaring concern—one that goes to the root of sustainability in our discipline. In the direct, digital and database marketing fields, there is a tremendous shortage now of qualified professionals, and likely in the near and long term.

The demand [for talent] has far outstripped the supply.” – Joe Zawadzki, Chief Executive, MediaMath, The New York Times (Front Page, Oct. 31, 2011)

The uncertain domestic and global economy masks a glaring concern—one that goes to the root of sustainability in our discipline. In the direct, digital and database marketing fields, there is a tremendous shortage now of qualified professionals, and likely in the near and long term.

  1. In its seminal research report, From Stretched to Strengthened: Insights from the Global Chief Marketing Officer Study (October 2011), IBM states that an explosion of data, social platforms, channel and device choices, and shifting demographics all point to tremendous hurdles for CMOs [chief marketing officers] to overcome. IBM calls it “a gap in readiness.” The ability of higher institutions to provide global (and local) brands with people with skills necessary to capitalize on customer-centric interactions is vital.

  2. Another current report from McKinsey’s Global Institute, Big Data: The next frontier for innovation, competition and productivity (May 2011), states that the world needs as many as 190,000 specialists with deep analytical skills whose sole focus is Web marketing (never mind, analyzing data in multi-channel environments). These new professionals will need to be steeped in mathematics and statistics, as well as in marketing and the vertical markets where brands reside.

  3. During the 2010-2012 period, according to the Direct Marketing Association (The Power of Direct Marketing, October 2011), the U.S. economy is forecast to create more than 280,000 jobs from mobile, search, Internet and email marketing alone. It’s vital we are able to deliver and develop professionals in our field who have requisite knowledge and education.

  4. In a recent employment study for Direct Marketing Association (Quarterly Digital and Direct Marketing Employment Report, September 2011), undertaken by Jerry Bernhart Associates, employers noted that analytics-related posts are the most highly sought in our field, followed by marketing, sales, creative and information technology. Most recently, 61 percent of employer respondents said they were experiencing difficulty attracting the right talent for open positions, with 50 percent attributing this to a shortage of qualified candidates, and 18 percent to a lack of specific job or technical skills.

  5. The Direct Marketing Educational Foundation (DMEF) serves to address the skills gap by enabling its Scholarship program, Student Career Forums, intensive training in interactive marketing (I-MIX), its Professor’s Institute, among other activities, to make direct and interactive marketing one of the most highly attractive fields for young adults. During the past year, DMEF engaged 2,580 students, more than 270 professors, and 650 schools in its various programs. We stand ready to exceed our success this coming year—but we need your support to do it.

For these five reasons, I just sent my donation to DMEF for its year-end DirectWorks Challenge (an initiative where I serve as a consultant). I encourage every professional in our field to make a tax-deductible donation today—preferably before Dec. 31, with my thanks: www.directworks.org/contribute

It’s the one donation that keeps giving back to us as marketing professionals.