LinkedIn Profile Makeover for Sellers

Are you appealing to emotional and tangible desires of buyers on your LinkedIn profile—in ways they cannot resist acting on? Reinsurance broker, Paul Dzielinski is. That’s how he’s enticing prospects to talk about buying his products. Dzielinski is generating leads with his LinkedIn profile using a system to get the job done faster. Once again, the process is rooted in traditional direct response copywriting. There are three components.

Are you appealing to emotional and tangible desires of buyers on your LinkedIn profile—in ways they cannot resist acting on? Reinsurance broker, Paul Dzielinski is. That’s how he’s enticing prospects to talk about buying his products.

Dzielinski is generating leads with his LinkedIn profile using a system to get the job done faster. Once again, the process is rooted in traditional direct response copywriting. There are three components.

  1. Solving customers problems in ways that
  2. are designed to provoke a response and ultimately
  3. foster buying confidence in customers (convert the lead).

Give Prospects a Reason to Act
Dzielinski knows that prospects are lazy. That’s why he gives them a reason to take action. There is no better reason than a pain, fear or goal his customers have.

Smart sellers like Dzielinski are placing videos and Slideshare presentations on LinkedIn that invite customers to act—to be taken on a journey. A trip where the prospect identifies as a buyer and then chooses to steer toward or away from products.

As it turns out, engagement is not the goal. Response is. But you’ve got to give customers a clear, compelling reason to act.

Design Slideshare Decks to Provoke Response
Dzielinski ‘s customers are asking him questions—the questions he wants to answer for them. Here’s how he’s doing it. It’s all about what and how prospects encounter content on his profile. For example, buyers are asking for advice, short-cuts and practical know-how based on a Slideshare deck on his profile.

What makes Dzielinski ‘s Slideshare deck work? Success is all about how the content is structured around the three-step process. Paul is successful because he exploits classic copywriting techniques via Slideshare.

Dzielinski is giving prospects temporary satisfaction. He’s answering questions in ways that satisfy for the moment, yet provokes intense curiosity, which creates more questions.

“It’s Copywriting 101,” says Copyblogger Media founder, Brian Clark. “You know, in copywriting, the purpose of the headline is to get the first sentence read. The purpose of the first sentence is to get the second sentence read.”

Get Prospects to Lean Forward
Clark says, when you apply the idea to SlideShare, “the purpose of each slide is to get the next slide advanced … and the next thing you know, your finger is just moving. Advance, advance, advance.”

Clark wisely points out, “It’s very engaging because it’s not a lean-back experience. It’s a lean forward. I want to see what the next slide says. And when it’s really well done, it’s fascinating. The next thing you know, you’ve gone through 70 slides and read the entire thing.”

In Dzielinski’s case, he’s offering prospects pithy, useful advice about captive insurance. Do they need it, why they might benefit, why not (what’s the “best fit”) and the kind of costs involved.

Using his PowerPoint presentation, he’s getting buyers curious about the details behind his solution. At the end he makes a call to action for a free assessment.

Is a deadly simple idea. Plus, it’s effective and repeatable.

The Truth About Sharing Content on LinkedIn
Your prospects don’t need engaging stories. Buyers have nagging problems and challenging goals that are far more important. What they need is a better way to achieve goals—or an insurance policy against risk. Thus, your job is to leverage this need and get customers curious about your remedy.

How can you help customers overcome the challenges they face, reduce the risks they need to take or find a short-cut to achieve a goal faster?

Make sure your words are making customers respond.

Make sure you LinkedIn profile is answering questions in ways that makes potential buyers think, “Yes, yes, YES … I should take action on that. That will probably create results for me. Now, how can I get my hands on more of those kinds of insights/tips?”

Need some help making this happen on your profile? View the 12-minute video training here.

Getting customers curious about you is the key to using LinkedIn for lead generation—effectively. This simple idea is the difference between wasting time on LinkedIn and having it pay you.

Good luck!

Why and How to Let Prospects ‘Pick Your Brain’ Online

“Can I pick your brain on social selling, Jeff?” As a B-to-B marketer myself, I cannot afford to say no. Neither can you. Because customers may not want to do it themselves, as we suspect they do. In fact, prospects seeking free advice are often latent buyers or great referral sources. Here are two reasons to let prospects “pick your brain” and a way to give away knowledge that grows your business.

“Can I pick your brain on social selling, Jeff?” As a B-to-B marketer myself, I cannot afford to say no. Neither can you. Because customers may not want to do it themselves, as we suspect they do. In fact, prospects seeking free advice are often latent buyers or great referral sources.

Here are two reasons to let prospects “pick your brain” and a way to give away knowledge that grows your business.

Is It Stupid to Give Away Your Best Secrets?
“What kind of a business owner would be so stupid as to give away a company secret?” asks business owner Jerry X. Shea. He says prospective buyers constantly ask him how he does what he does.

“My answer … ‘that is why you are paying us to do it, because others can’t,'” says Shea.

“In 1992, I purchased a six-year-old screen printing/embroidery company,” says Shea. “We developed a way to print a four-color process on a T-shirt, and as a result I knew we would get the 10,000-shirt job as other shops in the area could not do it. Now why would I want to post on the Internet what it was we did get that end result?”

Because the Internet is an insurance policy on prospects finding what they need—with or without your help. If they want to do it themselves, they’ll find out how.

Businesses have always created and defended competitive advantages. Today, the Internet speeds-up the spread of information and exposes advantages faster. Bottom line: It’s smart to rely less on proprietary knowledge (to drive success).

The DIY Myth and the Damage It Inflicts
“Giving prospects my best advice for free will help them to do it without me.”

Not always. Here’s why believing this can hurt you.

Don’t confuse customers qualifying you with what you perceive as their purchase intent.

The act of seeking out knowledge does not always translate to customers’ wanting to do it on their own. Even in cases where it does “signal” a customer’s desire to do-it-themselves, what they want may change.

You want to be there when it changes.

Who will be there when customers change their minds? Who will they turn to when switching from, “Oh, heck, I can do that” to “Oh my, that didn’t work quite like I expected” or “Oh my. I had no idea it was that complicated.”

You should be there. You can also structure the (free) knowledge to foster prospects’ change in mindset.

Beware. Avoid the following:

  1. Misinterpreting customers intent to buy. Don’t presume customers want to do (themselves) what you want to be paid for. They may be qualifying you or the challenge they face.
  2. Over-valuing your knowledge. Avoid believing what you know is more valuable than what your knowledge DOES for clients.

Effective Content Helps You Filter Leads
Should every interaction have a financial return? Of course not. However, your time is valuable and in limited supply. Let content do the heavy lifting for you. Let blogs, white papers, video tutorials nurture prospects toward or away from buying.

Effective content marketing on YouTube, blogs or LinkedIn is all about using words to let customers:

  • get confident in their buying decision and/or ability to buy (at all)
  • self-select themselves as leads to be nurtured
  • change their mind and not do-it-themselves—returning to a trusted adviser (you)

Success is not determined by how much knowledge a business gives away. Your success is based on the material effect your advice and knowledge have on prospects.

We cannot afford to say no when customers ask for free advice. Because the act of asking does not always signal a desire to do-it-themselves. Plus, even if they are in “DIY mode” they may try, fail and come back to you—the clear, proven authority.

In my business I try to remind myself daily: Few people are willing to pay for my knowledge … but many are willing to pay for what my knowledge will DO for them. My knowledge isn’t my competitive weapon; my higher level of service is.

“The world does not pay men for that which they know. It pays them for what they do, or induce others to do.” —Napoleon Hill