How Your Landing Page Is Sabotaging Your Google Ads Success

You’ve read all the tutorials. You’ve spent countless hours poring over demographic data for targeting, crafting the perfect ad copy, and tweaking your campaign. In fact, you’re doing everything you’re supposed to do — but you’re still not seeing any success with Google Ads. Does this sound familiar? If so, the problem probably isn’t with your ad campaign. Instead, look to your landing page for answers.

Here are five ways your landing page could be sabotaging your success with Google Ads.

Your Landing Page Doesn’t Match Your Ad

I’m big on the concept of congruence, which is a fancy way of saying that your ad and your landing page need to make sense together. A landing page is your opportunity to expand upon the copy in your ad. Rather than thinking of your ad and your landing page as two separate pieces, think of your ad as the synopsis or introduction to the landing page on your site.

If you own a furniture store and you’re creating an ad for bunk beds, but your landing page goes to a category page for all beds, it’s frustrating for your customer. They want to click the ad and see exactly what they came to your site for. The more they have to poke around your website to find what they need, the more likely you are to lose them in the process.

It’s also important to note that Google also wants your landing page to match your ad — they give higher quality scores to landing pages with text that is relevant to the text in the ad.

This leads us to our next mistake…

Your Homepage Is Your Landing Page

Repeat after me, “My homepage is not a good landing page. My homepage is not a good landing page. My homepage is not a good landing page.”

I’ve reviewed countless Google Ads accounts that were making this mistake and it was costing them hundreds to even thousands per month. If you’re advertising a service, your ad should go directly to a landing page focusing on that particular service; if you’re advertising a special deal or promo code, your ad should go directly to a landing page explaining how customers can take advantage of it.

To further expand on a point from above, you simply can’t expect potential customers or clients to find what they need. People are busy, impatient, and they don’t want to do the work. Hold their hands and guide them to the actions you want them to take. Create unique landing pages customized to all of your ads. Is it a bit of work? Yes. Is it worth it? Also yes.

Visitors Are Met With a Wall of Text

There are some boilerplate landing pages out there that are heavy on text, with a “Buy Now” button placed between every other paragraph. These are old school, but you still see them around occasionally and even businesses that don’t use these templates often borrow from the concept.

People aren’t interested in reading a dissertation about your product, service, or offer. That’s not how you make a sale. Instead, use bullet points, headings, and short paragraphs. Incorporate images and graphics and have a good headline that is congruent with your ad copy.

Your copy should be clear and concise—your landing page isn’t the place to write bloated SEO-style text that uses a lot of words to say very little. Keep it snappy and include calls to action.

It Loads Slowly

This one is self-explanatory so there’s not much more to add here. Google hates slow sites and so do consumers. Audit your site speed and replace or eliminate any code or plugins that are causing lags. People aren’t going to sit around waiting for your site to load — they’ll just click the back button and try another site instead. This is especially true for mobile, which leads to…

Your Site Isn’t Optimized for Mobile

It’s 2020. Smartphones have been around for a long time now. There’s no excuse not to have a site that’s optimized for mobile. These days, there are people who do virtually all of their internet searches on their phones. If your site requires a lot of pinching, zooming in, scrolling to the side to read long lines of text that don’t fit on the screen, etc., not only are people not going to bother, it also sends a message that your business is behind the times.

Want More Help With Your Google Ads Campaigns?

Click here to grab a copy of our Ultimate Google Ads Checklist.

5 Keys to Effective Unsubscribe Landing Pages

Let’s KISS. Now hang on … KISS isn’t only a romantic action, but for you as a marketer, knowing how to “Keep It Short and Simple” will help you maintain your email lists.

Email envelopesLet’s KISS.

You heard that right.

OK, you hear it from your significant other on a hopefully regular basis, but “Let’s KISS” can mean so much more.

Take your use of email subscriptions, or rather, your email unsubscribes. KISS isn’t only a romantic action, but for you as an email, product or service, or direct response marketer, knowing how to “Keep It Short and Simple” will help you maintain your email lists.

Why Do People Unsubscribe?

Email recipients generally cite several reasons for unsubscribing. These include:

  • They’re no longer interested in your products or services.
  • They’re receiving way too many emails.
  • They’re not interested in your content.

Create a Branded Landing Page

Ordinarily, your emails carry with them an unsubscribe link at the bottom. Subscribers just click on the link and they’re unsubscribed. Simple, right?

Why not create a meaningful branded landing page instead. You can actually retain more subscribers.

There are lots of ways to keep it simple and short when it comes to an unsubscribe landing page. Here are five keys to an effective landing page:

1. Set Up Preferences

Consider the use of preferences centers for email frequency, as well as the type of content to give subscribers a choice. This can be something like:

Marketer: “Hi there, do you really want to leave us?”
Subscriber: “Well, no, I’ll give you another chance.” This is making them have second thoughts.
Marketer: “Awesome! We thrilled you’ve decided to stay!”

You then provide them with the frequency of emails: daily, weekly, monthly, quarterly.

Jetsetter email
Jetsetter uses a grid to highlight email frequency.

Let subscribers select what types of emails they’d like to receive: sales, e-newsletters, company news, infographics.

J. Crew preference center
J. Crew gives the option of type of clothing.

Finally, let them update their email addresses if they wish. Make everything easy and obvious.

2. Make Your Unsubscribe Button Really Obvious

Many times, companies place their unsubscribe as a tiny link at the bottom of the email. Don’t let your subscribers have to search for that teeny weeny link. Provide them with a stand-out unsubscribe button that takes them to a substantial landing page, which might just make them change their minds.

Vidyard unsubscribe link
Vidyard makes its unsubscribe link easy to find.

8 Considerations for Planning a Google AdWords Campaign

Ready to make a splash in Google AdWords? If you’re marketing your small business, then you may have first-hand knowledge about the ease of using Google’s ad platform. But don’t be fooled — it takes more than hastily written ad copy and keywords to be successful in AdWords.

TM0810_searchglobe copyReady to make a splash in Google AdWords? If you’re marketing your small business, then you may have first-hand knowledge about the ease of using Google’s ad platform. Anyone with a Google account and a credit card can get ads up and running within minutes. Online marketing can be an intimidating concept, but AdWords distills the creation of ad campaigns into a simple, step-by-step process.

But don’t be fooled — it takes more than hastily written ad copy and keywords to be successful in AdWords. Much like cooking isn’t as simple as throwing food into the oven, creating profitable campaigns in AdWords requires knowing your target audience, analyzing competitors and defining goals for your advertising efforts. Do these things, and your campaigns are far more likely to hit their desired targets. Neglect this pre-launch research, though, and your ads may never flourish.

Here we’ll review eight important steps when planning your Google AdWords campaigns. Whether you’re new to AdWords or have some experience, these easy steps can strengthen your advertisements right out of the gate.

1. Define Who You’re Targeting

Think of your AdWords campaigns as radio stations. If you wanted to attract the most listeners, you wouldn’t play the same music on all of your stations. Some stations would play the current pop hits, while others may play rap, classical or country. Each unique station would resonate better with specific groups of people.

So when creating your campaigns, think carefully about who you’re trying to reach with each one. If you’re marketing a shoe store, do you want your newest campaign to target male or female shoppers? Are you marketing formal shoes or sneakers? Are you trying to appeal locally or attract nationwide online orders? Or perhaps you’re selling to a niche market, like people with unusually large feet? Any information you can gather on your target audience will help you build your campaigns.

2. Find Relevant, High-demand Keywords

Building quality keyword lists is essential for all your campaigns. However, good keywords need to be more than relevant — they also need to be in high demand. In search marketing, demand is measured by how many people are searching for various keywords. Keywords that garner little attention from Web users aren’t going to help your advertising campaigns.

Fortunately, Google makes it easy to find relevant, high-demand keywords. Simply enter your keyword ideas into the AdWords Keyword Suggestion Tool, and Google returns lists of similar keyword terms along with their estimated monthly search volumes and various other metrics. Estimated costs per click are shown, but these figures are often incorrect. Definitely pay attention to the level of competition for each keyword term; keywords with higher levels of competition are being bid on by more AdWords users, which pushes up the required bids for premium ad placements. You’ll maximize your reach and make your budget go further by finding relevant, high-volume keywords with less competition from other advertisers.

3. Make a Focused Sales Pitch

Knowing how to blast your ad to the masses is important, but reach doesn’t matter if your ad isn’t interesting. What exactly are you selling, and why should your campaign’s target audience care? What makes your business or your product special? Are you offering a deal or discount that your customers shouldn’t be without?

Your sales pitch must be short and sweet. Pay-per-click ads don’t leave much room for making your point, which is why it’s so crucial to zero in on one or two selling points for each of your campaigns. Choosing the sales pitches for your various campaigns goes hand-in-hand with knowing your target audiences.

6 Tips for Optimizing Google AdWords Keywords

SEO KeywordsOptimizing keywords is an ongoing task for anyone who uses Google AdWords. While there’s certainly a right way to research your initial keyword list, the simple truth is that no one knows for sure which keywords are going to perform the best until you test.

And that’s why we must optimize. Don’t panic if you realize that several of your keywords are underperforming — in online marketing, that’s par for the course. What matters more is that you constantly work on your keyword list to weed out the weak links. In the long run, this is how you’ll put your ads in front of the most appropriate, likely customers.

Here we’ll review the six most important tips when optimizing Google AdWords keywords lists.

1. Don’t Rush to Judgment
It’s tempting to hit the panic button when your ads go live and you don’t get the results you want. However, getting enough data to gauge the effectiveness of your keywords takes time. Even the best keywords have stretches when they’ll underperform. Nobody wants to spend money on ineffective advertising, but you won’t do yourself any favors by killing off keywords too soon.

Instead, relax and give your campaigns time to collect data. You’re better off setting a modest advertising budget if you’re worried about wasting money. But you can’t optimize your keywords without a good amount of data, and you won’t get that by making premature changes to your campaigns.

2. Find the Most Relevant Keywords
Everyone loves relevant keywords. Perfectly relevant keywords help online shoppers find the goods and services they want most, and that’s what makes Google’s search engine so valuable for Web users. And when Google rewards relevance with cheaper costs per click, then that’s great for online marketers like you — not to mention you’re more likely to connect with more customers.

Review your keyword list and add potential long-tail keywords, which are keyword phrases (often three to five words) that shoppers are likely to search for verbatim. Focus on buyer-intent keyword terms that include words such as “buy,” “find” or “deals,” these tend to be used by potential customers who are looking to make purchases. Focusing on relevance can help you convert your Web traffic into sales.

3. Make Sure Your Keywords are Relevant to Your Landing Pages
Sometimes, a perfectly viable keyword can be hamstrung by your website. When people who search for that keyword in Google click your ad, are you showing them the most relevant page of your site?

If your answer is “no,” then you have two options: You can revise your landing page content to be more relevant to your keyword, or you can move your keyword to a more appropriate ad group. The best way forward depends entirely on your keyword list. Be careful about making changes to your landing pages that might diminish the relevance of other strong performing keywords.

12 Design Considerations for Optimized Landing Pages

“It’s just the order card.” I hear this all the time from young creatives and marketers alike. This can be one of the most overlooked parts for a campaign, direct mail package and/or landing page. Yet it shouldn’t be.

“It’s just the order card.” I hear this all the time from young creatives and marketers alike. This can be one of the most overlooked parts for a campaign, direct mail package and/or landing page. Yet it shouldn’t be. That’s your cash register — where you can lose a sale if the messaging is difficult to figure out, hard to complete, and unclear what to do next.

Let’s dive into digital order forms and explore some best practices for how you can design landing pages that will help close the sale instead of frustrating your page visitors.

12 Design Considerations to Optimize Your Landing Pages
1. Roadmap the page:
The layout is critical. Create a clear path for your customers to follow. It should be obvious where to go and what you want them to do step by step.

2. Hit them in the face with a frying pan: Don’t be clever or cute. Be obvious. You have only a few seconds before they get confused, frustrated, lost or simply change their mind.

3. Deliver a clear page headline: Have a headline that clearly spells out the purpose of the page. Place it at the top as the start of your page roadmap.

4. Use visual cues: People “read” pictures faster than words. So be sure to include your logo, a picture of your product, your call to action (CTA) button, color blocks and containers.

Critical Mention Landing Page5. Remove the clutter: Ask yourself “Does it really need to be there?” Is it helping the customer or simply confusing them? Is it visual clutter? It’s either a yes or a no. “Maybe” is always a no.

6. Use contrasting colors: Color can be a powerful tool. It can help you roadmap your page and make it clear where users need to pay attention. This is most important when it comes to your information collection and your CTA.

7. Remove navigation: Don’t give them an out, or a chance to navigate elsewhere. You want them to focus on your landing page.

8. Add sharing: Add your social media links and/or a share button. This can definitely increase your traffic and results. Be obvious, but subtle. You don’t want these icons to overpower your call to action.

9. Use credibility and trust symbols: If you have TV or media endorsements, use their logos on your page — but remember to keep them small and subdued. They are valuable as credibility and support, but are not the point of your landing page. Same with a testimonial from a credible client. Use them sparingly and as a support element.

Smart Sheet Landing Page10. Use normal conventions: Do not reinvent the wheel. Visitors understand normal conventions and look for them. It will help them move quickly through your forms and get to your CTA.

11. Remember mobile is taking over: Your landing page must be easy to view and complete on a smart phone and tablet.

12. Test. Test. Test. These are just guidelines. You need to continuously A/B test the elements of your design for maximum results. As they say, your mileage my vary.

Remember the key to effective landing pages is simplicity and clarity. The design of your landing pages must lead the visitor through the page, culminating on them hitting the CTA button.

Your Top 5 Direct Marketing Problems

What do you consider your greatest marketing problem? Or perhaps of even more interest: What do your peers report as their top marketing problems? And if you could, wouldn’t you want to know what channels your competitors report as working for them?

Angry manWhat do you consider your greatest marketing problem? Or perhaps of even more interest: What do your peers report as their top marketing problems? And if you could, wouldn’t you want to know what channels your competitors report as working for them? I recently surveyed a few marketers with those questions, so today I share what’s on their minds, along with an analysis of those marketing problems and successful channels as we go into 2016.

First, the top five problems:

  1. “Finding new customers and reengaging the ones we have to buy again.”
  2. “Competitive pressure is relentless and we’re struggling to break out.”
  3. “Overwhelmed with channel choices and uncertain what channels to use.”
  4. “Marketing in general isn’t delivering like it used to.”
  5. “Profitability is too low.”

Next, the channels with the highest satisfaction:

  1. Email
  2. Websites/landing pages
  3. Facebook
  4. Video
  5. Direct mail

Combining these two topics, I offer this analysis in the form of three takeaways:

Takeaway No. 1
Problem No. 1, finding new customers, and No. 3, channel choices, are linked. If these two elements are your problems too, you may be limiting your profitability with the channels you’re using. The number of channel choices and the pace at which they evolve is dizzying. You need to be knowledgeable about them (or find someone who can untangle them for you). You may need to venture out into the unknown. As they saying goes, you need to “meet your customers where they are.” If they’re on a channel you’re not using, then you likely suffer from difficulties in finding new customers and reengaging past customers.

Now, let’s overlay these problems with the channels where your peers report satisfaction.

  • The marketers who I heard from are satisfied with email marketing. If you’re not happy with your email marketing results, maybe it’s time to more aggressively A/B test new approaches to identify winners. Don’t forget the importance of your landing page to close deals.
  • Consider A/B testing of video on your landing page and evaluate its impact on conversions. Or test a long-form video sales letter. A well-done video can create greater comprehension.
  • Have you tried Facebook remarketing? Promoted posts? Are you engaging your followers frequently, with meaningful content, to create raving fans? Once you build Facebook followers, you have to continue to deliver meaningful content before you see results.

Takeaway No. 2
Problem No. 2, competitive pressure, and No. 4, marketing not delivering like it used to, can also be linked. How do you break away from your competition? You may need to re-examine your unique selling proposition, and then reposition your product or organization.

Have you conducted a competitive analysis? Research what your competitors are doing online and the channels they are using. Document your findings, then make a list of the top five things they’re doing that you’re not and test new approaches.

Takeaway No. 3
Problem No. 5, low profitability, reveals that you need to find lower-cost channels, or make a higher-cost channel like direct mail work better. Another possibility: reevaluate your offer and price. The top three channels where marketers are satisfied (email, websites and Facebook) are typically less expensive than direct mail, but require ongoing content development. Video doesn’t have to be expensive, especially if you’re able to use customer-generated video for testimonials.

If profitability is lower than you want, now is the time for two tests: One is to invest in lower cost channels. The second is to test new creative and/or production values in direct mail to either increase response, or lower your cost per response.

Google AdWords Audit Checklist: How to Optimize Your Campaign

Google AdWords is a vital advertising tool for many businesses. However, like anything else, it must be audited and maintained regularly to ensure that it remains fully optimized. Here is a checklist to follow.

Google AdWords logoGoogle AdWords is a vital advertising tool for many businesses. It allows you to focus your advertising budget on customers who are ready to buy, giving you a steady stream of eager new prospects. It also allows you to start with whatever budget you’re comfortable with, making it a tremendous resource for small businesses.

However, many business owners are not maximizing their campaign performance, so they are leaving money on the table month after month. Like anything else, your Google AdWords campaign must be audited and maintained regularly to ensure that it remains fully optimized. Here is a checklist to follow.

Keywords
Keywords commonly trip up both new and experienced AdWords users because there are so many factors to consider. To optimize your keywords, I recommend using three distinct tactics, each of which addresses a common problem.

  • Pruning: The goal of pruning is to remove unprofitable keywords from your list, including those that are irrelevant and those that, for whatever reason, simply do not perform well for you. To start pruning, run a Google AdWords Search Terms report from the Keywords tab of your account. Any keyword that does not show solid performance should be removed or paused. Also consider adding negative keywords, which tell AdWords not to display your ad if a particular word appears in the search string.
  • Fishing: The goal of fishing is to find new keywords that will be profitable for your campaign. Again, run a Google AdWords Search Terms report and look for keyword phrases that are performing well, but are not yet in your Ad Groups.
  • Replanting: Replanting is a process to optimize your top performing keywords while limiting your budget for new or unproven keywords. Move your top keywords into their own campaign, and focus on tweaking your ad copy and landing pages to tightly match those keywords. Likewise, move unproven keywords to their own campaign and reduce their budget until you get more data on them. Replanting allows you to improve your quality score, increase your click-through rate, and maintain better control over your advertising dollars.

Ads
Your ad copy is an excellent place to optimize your AdWords campaign, since it is virtually impossible to write perfect copy on the first, or even the tenth, try. Here are a few ways to optimize your ads.

  • Split testing: Never allow just one ad to run in an ad group. Always run at least two ads so that you can compare their performance.
  • Offer: No matter how good the rest of your ad copy is, a weak offer can sink your AdWords campaign. Remember that a great offer minimizes customer risk and overcomes the tendency for procrastination. Review your competitors’ offers, think through what would appeal to your ideal customer, and split test different offers in your ads.
  • Extensions: Ad extensions factor into your quality score, and also play a role in improving your click-through rate, so make sure you are taking advantage of all of them. The Review extension, with a third party endorsement, is particularly useful in building credibility.
  • Other factors: Other areas of your ad copy that should be audited include your headline, display URL, and description. Make sure that each section is clear and succinct, focusing on how you can solve a problem or fulfill a need for your prospect. Ensure that your entire ad is internally consistent, easy to follow, and has a strong call to action.

Landing Pages
Your landing page is your opportunity to close the sale, turning visitors into leads and customers. It must be laser-focused to match the ad, reassuring the prospect that she is in the right place and explaining what to do next. Optimizing your landing page is not easy, but it’s critical to your campaign performance.

  • Dedicated landing pages: One of the most common mistakes that business owners make is using their homepage as a landing page for ads. A secondary mistake is using the same landing page for lots of unrelated keywords. Make sure your landing page is 100 percent congruent with the keywords and ads in each Ad Group.
  • Congruence: As mentioned above, your landing page must be fully congruent with your ad. This means that the landing page copy should match the keywords, and the landing page offer should repeat the offer made in the ads.
  • Call to Action: It sounds crazy, but I have reviewed countless landing pages that do not explicitly explain what the visitor needs to do to start the buying process.  As a consumer, it’s frustrating when it’s not clear what to do so most prospective customers will leave rather than try to figure it out.  So make sure your landing page has a clear call-to-action, ideally above the fold so the visitor does not have to scroll to find it.

Tracking
Tracking is the only method you have for determining how well your AdWords campaign is performing. Make sure that each of the following forms of AdWords tracking is set up properly in your account:

  • Webform conversion tracking to measure how many visitors complete your webforms
  • Shopping cart conversion tracking to measure how many visitors complete online orders
  • Website call tracking to measure how many visitors call after clicking on your ads
  • Call extension tracking to measure how many people call using the number displayed in your ads
  • Offline sales import conversion tracking to measure how many sales are generated offline via phone calls or in-person

Optimizing and maintaining your Google AdWords campaign is an ongoing, never ending process. A regular audit procedure will determine which portions of your campaign are working well, and which need some attention. Although it may seem lot a lot of work, following an audit checklist like this can be completed quickly if you break up the tasks over the course of a week or two.

Want more Google AdWords tips and advice? I put together an AdWords checklist to help you get your campaigns set up for success. Click here to get my complete Google AdWords checklist.

Empower Your Direct Mail With Mobile

Direct mail marketing has been around for a long time; it’s sometimes thought of as the “old goat” of marketing. Over the years there have been many changes in the way we use direct mail for marketing. Slapping a resident label on a card and mailing to everyone in your city does not cut it anymore

Direct mail marketing has been around for a long time; it’s sometimes thought of as the “old goat” of marketing. Over the years there have been many changes in the way we use direct mail for marketing. Slapping a resident label on a card and mailing to everyone in your city does not cut it anymore.

Some of the best practices that have been in use for a while now are listed below. By using some or all of these, you can help keep your direct mail more cost effective and easily increase your ROI.

  • Targeted mail lists: There are so many ways you can really define your best prospects.
  • Mail tracking: Know when your mail delivered so that you can follow up.
  • Creative designs: Stand out in the mail box.
  • A/B testing: Really track results on what messaging and formats get the best response.

Since many people now spend more time on their mobile devices, you can use your direct mail to catch people on the go. In this day and age, we can empower our direct mail with technology to drive an even greater response.

When your direct mail has the latest technology, you let the recipient into the driver’s seat of your marketing. You allow them to pick and choose the information they are interested in at that moment. You can incorporate mobile marketing into your direct mail by using some or all of the following, as easy gateways to online information via recipient’s cell phones.

  • QR Codes: Directs them to a landing page with an offer, a way to buy or more information.
  • Augmented Reality: Use your imagination to create a powerful experience.
  • NFC: Near Field Communication can be used to drive mobile devices where ever you want to with a tap or touch between the phone and an embedded chip.
  • PURL: Unique and personalized landing page created especially for each recipient.

By adding these instant response methods, you increase the opportunity to catch someone in the moment as a hot lead, if not a sale. After all direct mail influences 76 percent of internet users to buy a product or service online (Exact Target), so you need to make sure that you are driving that online engagement. Creating the mobile optimized landing pages for recipients to gather more information, make a purchase or share ideas with others is a must with each direct mail campaign you do.

Thirty-four percent of consumers search online for more information about a product or service when receiving direct mail from a brand they are interested in (Direct Marketing Association). Don’t you want to be the one controlling the information they see, rather than Google? When you create the landing pages and supply all the information, your competitors are not there to distract from your message, you are in control. Some helpful tips to keep in mind when creating the landing pages are below.

  • Use the same design theme as the direct mail piece for a consistent look.
  • Ask for minimal information in order for them to download or signup for something, basically name and email address.
  • Allow them to make a purchase from the mobile landing page.
  • Make the call to action simple.
  • All the messaging on the landing pages need to follow the lead of the direct mail piece. If you switch gears on the landing page, it will be confusing to the customer/prospect.

By empowering your direct mail with choices and ways to gather information, you are empowering your customer/prospect to make a quick and easy decision on your call to action. This means your direct mail will need to have a clear call to action with more than one way to respond. It is vital that you incorporate mobile response devises now, because mobile users are growing rapidly and along with them mobile purchases. Your direct marketing company can help you to create the landing pages and the QR Codes, Augmented Reality, PURL’s or NFC. Incorporating the mobile response devices does not have to be labor intensive for you.

A LinkedIn Profile Call to Action

LinkedIn profile pages contain areas where a call to action should be placed, such as the publications and summary sections. Are you linking out to landing pages that generate leads? Let’s make sure you are using calls to action to the fullest—to generate more response from prospects. Here are some tips on the best spots to place effective LinkedIn profile calls to action.

LinkedIn profile pages contain areas where a call to action should be placed, such as the publications and summary sections. Are you linking out to landing pages that generate leads? Let’s make sure you are using calls to action to the fullest—to generate more response from prospects. Here are some tips on the best spots to place effective LinkedIn profile calls to action.

Where to Place a LinkedIn Call to Action
You can make a call to action anywhere in your LinkedIn profile. Literally. But there are areas that will get more response than others. The publication section and multimedia (sub-section) of my profile summary generates most of my leads. Your main choices are:

  • Publications
  • Projects
  • Summary
  • Multimedia (video, images, presentations) sub-sections
  • Activity and Volunteering/Causes

Publications: Not Just for Authors
Yes, if you have a book, paper or any kind of written document, this section is ripe for a call to action. Content marketers: This section is for you.

However, you don’t need to be an author to take advantage of the publications section. You can drive traffic to any kind of landing page or product page. There are no restrictions on what a “publication” can be.

All you need is a crisp, clear call to action using text. I also use text symbols to catch the eye.

But what landing page do you need to send prospects to? For example, I have books and written publications for sale on my website AND available free. I use the publication section of my profile to link to my book at Amazon (to drive sales) … but I also link to my free Chapter 1 download page that generates more lucrative business leads.

I also send prospects to landing pages with lead generation offers and sales pages for my most popular LinkedIn sales training and coaching products. The publications section is a flexible space to make your LinkedIn profile call to action.

Your Turn
Do you give away free trials, eBooks or “free tastes” of a product or service in exchange for a name and email address? Do you have lead generation landing pages for free publications or tutorials? How about product pages?

The publications section allows you to create a call to action right in a big, bold hyperlink (Title) along with a short description of what can be expected at the other side of the link.

How to Do it in 7 Quick Steps
To add a publication with call to action:

  1. Click on Edit Profile and look in the right hand column. You’ll see a “Recommended for You” section featuring a handful of optional sections, including Publications. Click it.
  2. Use the “Name” field for your LinkedIn profile call to action. Use symbols to call attention to your call to action. You may also use capital letters.
  3. Select Occupation (your most relevant job position).
  4. Select Date (the current date is fine or add the date your publication was published).
  5. Publication URL: Place the URL of your landing page here!
  6. Author: Select yourself.
  7. Description: Use this space to place more specific trigger words—words that speak to exactly what your target prospect wants more than anything else. Entice them to click!

Examples of calls to action from my profile include: “free online training … make your blog sell for you” and “how to make social media sell for you.”

Always Use ‘Trigger Words’
Always use good copywriting tactics. This part is critical to success. Trigger words encourage prospects to take action—drive them to your best content marketing landing pages. Use phrases like:

  • Get all the details
  • Call me, email me
  • Discover fresh tips
  • See examples here
  • Start here (this one is very powerful believe it or not!)

Remember: You can make a call to action anywhere in your LinkedIn profile. However, there will be spots that get better response.

Do you have good, pithy, action-oriented video content? Do they make calls to action using, for example, YouTube annotations embedded in video? Us the Multimedia sub-section of you or your sales team’s profile. Get on the stick. Make your LinkedIn profile call to action today. Good luck and let me know how it goes for you!

7 Steps to a Better B-to-B Landing Page

Despite years of practice with digital campaigns, B-to-B marketers still have trouble getting their landing pages to work as hard as they could. I am not sure why, since there’s nothing more important to capturing the responses from outbound messages and kicking off a relationship with prospects. You could say the landing page is where your campaign pays off. But I am still seeing obvious errors

Despite years of practice with digital campaigns, B-to-B marketers still have trouble getting their landing pages to work as hard as they could. I am not sure why, since there’s nothing more important to capturing the responses from outbound messages and kicking off a relationship with prospects. You could say the landing page is where your campaign pays off. But I am still seeing obvious errors. So herewith I offer a seven-point checklist of landing page best practices. And I invite readers to add some of their own recommendations.

1. Connect the landing page directly to the outbound message. When respondents click through to the landing page, they should experience a seamless flow from one to the other. The outbound message—whether a SEM ad, an email, a direct mail piece or even a print ad—should act like the teaser, to motivate the recipient to click or type in the landing page URL. The role of the landing page is to close on the deal, the same way a salesperson asks for the order. So the two formats should act as one, working together to move the prospect along. If they are disjointed—whether through design or copy inconsistency—the momentum is lost.

2. Create a fresh landing page for each variable in your campaign. OK, I know this means work. But the effort that goes into the outbound message should be equaled or exceeded when crafting the response vehicle. If you are doing an A/B test on your creative or your offer, you need two landing pages. Plan for it.

3. Mobile-enable your landing page. No excuses. The dramatic rise in tablet and smartphone use cannot be ignored. As any direct marketer will tell you: Don’t get in the way. If you put up any obstacles, your response rate will inevitably be lower. A landing page that is engineered for ease of use on mobile devices is no longer a nice to have; it’s a must.

4. Prepopulate the form where possible. If your outbound message includes digital information about the respondents, don’t make them retype their data.

5. Ask for the minimal amount of information you need to take the next step in the relationship. The more elements you require, the lower your response rate. So ask yourself, “How will asking for this piece of information change the way I deal with the inquiry?” If the answer is, “It won’t,” then hold that query for a later stage in the relationship.

6. Develop a culture of constant testing. Any responsive vehicle benefits from continuous improvement. Your landing page is the perfect place to test copy, offer, layout and other variables like the number of data elements you ask for. Do it, don’t duck it.

7. Follow landing page design best practices. Hubspot offers some excellent tips in this area. Remember that the purpose of a landing page is to drive an action. So everything you do-the copy, the offer, the layout, the graphics-must focus on that end.

I welcome your ideas on how to improve landing page results.

A version of this post appeared in Biznology, the digital marketing blog.