Increase Traffic Using Direct Mail With Geomapping

Are you driving enough traffic to your business or event with your current direct mail campaigns? Personalized direct mail pieces with an added personalized map can help increase your visits and event attendance. Direct mail with geomapping allows you to create customized maps.

Are you driving enough traffic to your business or event with your current direct mail campaigns? Personalized direct mail pieces with an added personalized map can help increase your visits and event attendance. Direct mail with geomapping allows you to create customized maps based on your prospect or customer’s mailing address and the location of your business or event.

There are many ways to do this and different features. Let’s take a look.

Map Style Options

  1. Driving or Walking Directions For people who are really close, you may want to offer walking maps.
  2. Fastest or Shortest Routes The fastest routes are not always the shortest distance, so you have your choice of which one you wish to offer.
  3. Map Size Depending on your design, you may want a larger map size.
  4. If you have Multiple Locations, you can have maps for each one, or choose the location closest to the individual you are mailing to.
  5. You can Add Your Logo to the Destination on the map.
  6. Pick a Route Color for Your Map Stand out with vibrant colors.
  7. You can Provide Travel Time.
  8. Add Turn-by-Turn Directions, if you wish.
  9. Multiple Route Options on the Same Map, with different color highlights.

As you can see, there are several options you can choose from. Not only can you use these maps on your direct mail pieces, but you can use them in multichannel campaigns, as well. Remember, the more touches you have with prospects and customers, the more likely they are to respond. It’s not every day that you get a mail piece with a custom map on it. That level of personalization makes your customers and prospects feel special.

The personalized maps are not only eye catching, but super functional. Show people how easy it is to reach you. You can also remove people from your list who are too far away to want to drive to your location. That way, you save money by not sending to people who will not attend. Not only that, if you have multiple locations, you can list three choices for them, with maps to each one. List the closest one first, followed by second and third. This is very helpful when you have events on different days at different locations. They now get to choose what works best for them. Your prospects and customers want to know how long it will take to get to your location or event. So tell them.

Who can help you with personalized geomapping? Here are some providers:

Maps are a great way to grab attention and drive traffic to your location or event. They also help you connect with your prospects and customers at a deeper level, because you are talking directly to them with an easy way to reach you. Some businesses have seen a 6% or better lift by adding personalized maps. Are you ready to get started?

Need Prospects? 5 Direct Mailing List Types to Help You Find Them

Direct mail is a great way to reach targeted prospects to turn them into customers, but how do you select the right prospects? There are so many mailing list options, it can feel overwhelming. Let’s look at the various list options.

Direct mail is a great way to reach targeted prospects to turn them into customers, but how do you select the right prospects? There are so many mailing list options, it can feel overwhelming.

Let’s look at the various list options.

Prospect data is marketing data that has been collected and compiled for the purpose of new customer acquisition. This data is compiled from a variety of public record sources, including deed recordings, surveys, telephone directories, self-reported and more.

5 Prospect List Types

  1. Residential/Occupant: This list is compiled from USPS intelligence carrier route-level demographics, and you can segment businesses. The purpose of this type of list is to saturate an area and have names associated with it, along with census demographics, unlike EDDM. The advantage of this list is deep postal discounts. The disadvantages are the ability to only target to the ZIP-carrier route level, there are fewer options for personalization, and it uses only postal data.
  2. Consumer: This list can be selected by demographics, psychographics, life stage, lifestyles, behavioral, new mover, new homeowner, new borrower, new connect, pre-mover, mortgage/loan, and property data. The purpose of this type of list is to target consumers at their home addresses. The advantages of this list are: controlling who receives your offer; rich demographics selects for enhanced targeting, so you can use variable data for creative optimization; you can use look-alike targeting through the use of demographic profiles; and there are multi-channel opportunities.
  3. Business: This list can be selected by contact names, job titles, company size, ownership status, square footage, own vs. rent, years in business, business expenses, credit rating, SIC, and NAICS. The purpose of this list is finding businesses and/or business professionals. The advantage of this list is you can target specific types of businesses and key contacts within them.
  4. Specialty: This list can be selected by many things. Here are some of them: automotive, hospitals, doctors and nurses, education, government, voters, clubs/nonprofits, insurance agents, pilots, realtors, churches, or pool owners. The purpose of this list is to be able to target consumers or businesses based on specific niche attributes most commonly related to occupation/profession. The advantage of this list is a highly targeted audience.
  5. Managed: This list can be selected by niche marketing, RFM, subscriber files, specific purchases, past purchases, hotline buyers, multi-buyers, responders, or donors. The purpose of this type of list is the ability to identify consumers and businesses by their actions and affinities; to benefit from RFM (recency, frequency, and monetary value). The advantage of this type of list is significant targeting.

Keep in mind that the cost of prospecting lists goes up, the more targeted you get. However, by targeting correctly, you can send fewer mail pieces to more people who are most likely to buy from you. You can save money, send to the right segment of people, and increase your ROI when you mail to the right people.

There is also the option of profiling your current customers and then finding like people in your marketplace, which we will discuss in the next article. Are you ready to select your prospect list?

How to Create Influential Variable Data Direct Mail

The real power in direct mail is sending the right offer to the right person. In order to do this effectively, you need to be using variable data direct mail for offers and images, not just names.

The real power in direct mail is sending the right offer to the right person. In order to do this effectively, you need to be using variable data direct mail for offers and images, not just names.

“Dear Summer” does not grab me. What draws me in are offers that I want. So if you send me direct mail, send me offers for fishing, camping, reading and, of course, the normal household requirements. Yet, every day I get mail that is not appropriate for me, such as offers for baby gear (my kids are adults now).

When direct mail is sent to someone who is not interested in it, it’s basically junk mail and is thrown in the trash. So how can you prevent that from happening with your mail? Use your list wisely.

  • Step 1: Your Data — You need to make sure that your data files are correct. This means not only checking to see if addresses are correct, but that you have all of the purchase history and any other relevant information up to date. You can’t use bad data.
  • Step 2: Your Offers — Now you will need to decide what your offers are going to be. You can have as many offers as you want, just be sure you send one offer per person.
  • Step 3: Your Copy/Messaging — You will need to create your copy/messaging to highlight your offer and raise interest. Compelling and relevant copy drives response. Take the time to write yours. Remember to stay away from acronyms and keep your word choice simple and concise.
  • Step 4: Your List — Now you are ready to target people in your list based on your offers. Select people into groups for which offer best matches them. You can code them and use that offer code for them to respond. This will with analyzing your results later.
  • Step 5: Your Images — Now that you have your offers and your data segmented you are ready to select the variable images to match each offer. The image should help convey your message without words. It should also grab attention. You will want at least one image per offer and depending on your design you may need more than one.
  • Step 6: Your Design — You will need to decide what your design will be no matter whether it is a postcard, self-mailer or booklet you will want to create a layout that has static elements across all versions and areas where your variable copy, offers and images will drop in.
  • Step 7: Your QC — Variable data requires extensive quality control. You should sample each version with multiple people to make sure that everything is working correctly. We have also found that once everything is good then create batch pdf merged files rather than printing direct to the printer. This helps maintain your quality through the run and prevents any hiccups in large file transmission across a network.
  • Step 8: Your Results — Since you coded your offers you will know who responded and what they responded to. This allows you to plan future mail campaigns based on what worked and what did not.

Obviously variable data is not the be all and end all of direct mail marketing, but it can really help you to save money by only sending pieces to people who are interested in it. You will also see a response increase when you send the right offer to the right person. Another benefit is that people look forward to getting mail that they like. So when you have a track record of sending offers they want, they will take the time to read your next mailer to see what great offer they can get now. Are you ready to get started?

Direct Mail for Nonprofit Fundraising

One of the most common industries to use direct mail is the nonprofit sector. With the economic hard times many nonprofits have more people to serve and are getting less in donated funds. This creates a drastic gap between needs and financial ability to provide them. In many cases, this gap is driving nonprofits to create more fundraising campaigns as well as finding more potential donors to send to.

One of the most common industries to use direct mail is the nonprofit sector. With the economic hard times, many nonprofits have more people to serve and are getting less in donated funds. This creates a drastic gap between needs and financial ability to provide them. In many cases, this gap is driving nonprofits to create more fundraising campaigns as well as finding more potential donors to send to. So let’s see how direct mail can drive your response to increase your donations. Direct mail is more costly than sending out an email due to printing, mailing and postage costs, but when you can increase your ROI to more than cover that cost, it can be well worth it.

In direct mail your list is one of the most important parts. Obviously, the best list is your list of current donors. The USPS requires you to comply with their Move Update regulations by updating your lists every 95 days. There are several important list hygiene tools available to help keep your data clean and accurate.

  • Don’t forget to occasionally solicit lapsed donors. Consider telemarketing to those audiences in addition to mail.
  • Keep your donor mailing lists up to date. Obsolete data not only costs you money spent on undeliverable or misdirected mail, but can cause lost donations and can impact donor goodwill.
  • Studies have found that on average, up to 20 percent of records within a typical house file are undeliverable. By keeping your data current, you will save on printing, mailing and postage costs.
  • National Change of Address (NCOA) for new addresses of people who have moved.
  • Dedupe, so that you are not sending multiple pieces to the same address.
  • Deceased recipient purging, removing anyone who has been reported as recently deceased, can be a great asset as your list of donors are aging.

Finding good lists of prospective donors can be hard. Here are a few ideas you can try.

  1. Trade lists other nonprofits in your area. Make sure to code the lists when you send them out so that you know who responded from what list.
  2. You can find targeted prospect lists by looking for individuals who are sympathetic to your mission and have the capacity to give. By utilizing available list targeting tools it is possible to find prospects that most closely resemble your best donors.
  3. You can customize a list to your specific cause and overlay demographic and psychographic intelligence onto your donor data.
  4. Another option is to profile you donor list. Sophisticated list profiling is now a reality. Through a powerful array of new market segmentation tools you can profile the unique characteristics of your best donors and identify and target new prospects most like them. The results can boost your direct response rate, increase your market penetration, and dramatically improve your fundraising ROI.

Something else that Nonprofits should take note of, if you are mailing raffle tickets: The United States Postal Service (USPS) is strictly enforcing regulations on mailing raffle tickets. If you plan to mail raffle tickets for a fundraiser, you must meet requirements or the USPS could legally refuse to accept your mail. While it is legal to include advertising for a raffle, including a raffle or lottery ticket in a mailing is strictly prohibited unless you follow USPS guidelines. To avoid potential problems, the USPS requires the ticket makes clear that no payment is required to enter a raffle. The following elements should appear on each ticket in a mailing:

  1. Use the wording “suggested donation” before the price of the ticket.
  2. Use the wording “no donation required to enter” or add a check box “Please enter my name in the drawing. I do not wish to make a donation at this time.”

An alternative is to not include a ticket in the mailing. It is legal to advertise a raffle by mail, but you should still use the phrase “suggested donation” if you list the price of a ticket on the advertisement.

Using direct mail for nonprofit fundraising is a great way to help increase your donations. If you are in need of other tips or tricks feel free to reach out and ask providers. They have a wealth of knowledge to help you.

Best Practices Exist for a Reason, Part 3: Email Results Analysis

For many marketers, the bulk of their time is taken up with list selection, subject lines, email design and ensuring the email links to integrated landing pages. But not enough time is spent analyzing the results of those efforts in order to learn and apply it to the next campaign.

For many marketers, the bulk of their time is taken up with list selection, subject lines, email design and ensuring the email links to integrated landing pages. But not enough time is spent analyzing the results of those efforts in order to learn and apply it to the next campaign.

Whenever clients ask us to help them with new creative, our very first question is “Can we see what you’ve done before and the results associated with it?” You’d be amazed how many don’t have this information — let alone know where they can find it.

And on many occasions when they do provide us with it, they are unsure how to interpret the results or use them to influence the next campaign effort. So here are a few best practices worth considering:

  • Maintain a Historical Record: You should have one digital file that contains the creative for every email you’ve blasted. Organize them by target audience (existing customers, warm prospects, cold prospects). This makes them much easier to find when you’re thinking about your next campaign by audience type.
  • Target Audience: Ideally your notes should include the parameters you used to select your target from your house file (e.g. customers who haven’t purchased in 60 days from X/XX/XX; or inquirers who downloaded whitepaper “ABC” between X/XX/XX and X/XX/XX”). If you rented or purchased an outside list, include additional information like the company you rented from, the name of the list, the parameters you provided to them, and the price you paid (you’ll want this to measure your ROI).
  • Blast Quantity: While this is important, it’s NOT the metric you should be using to calculate your open rates. You’ll also want the number of hard and soft bounces, and whether or not your email system is automatically re-blasting to soft bounces at another time. You want to start measuring results based on how many recipients actually received your email which requires you to subtract hard and soft bounces from your gross blast quantity.
  • Open Rates: While this may seem like a no-brainer, emails can get opened up to 10 days after you blasted, so be sure to take a “final” tally a few weeks after your initial blast date instead of creating your only results report within a few days of the blast.
  • Clickthrough Rates: This number should be based as a percent of the number of unique individuals who opened the email. I’ve seen lots of email companies report click thru rates as a calculation of clicks divided by the number blasted—and I just find that irritating. Your audience can’t click unless it opens the email, so the most important stat is to understand how many of those that opened, clicked.
  • Conversion to Sale: What was the objective of the campaign? To sell a product? To download a whitepaper? Don’t assume that just because your target clicked on the link, they took the next step. Using Google analytics (if you don’t have any other source of intel) will let you see which links a web visitor clicked on, including the “download” or “shopping cart” button. If your email is the only source of driving traffic to this page, then you can match this rate back to your email campaign. If your email drives the recipient to your website, shame on you. Read Part 2 of this series about Best Practices for Landing Pages.

If you achieve a high open rate (there are lots of recent industry stats here for comparison), then your problem is not your subject line.

If you achieve a high click thru rate, then you’ve designed great email creative with a great offer (and may want to examine/test your subject line to see if you can get better exposure of your message).

If you achieve a low conversion rate, reexamine your landing page. Does it match your email offer? Is it working as hard as possible to lead the visitor to the desired next step? Is your button obvious and clear what the recipient will get when they click?

The truth is, you won’t really know if YOUR email campaign is working until you establish some benchmark metrics, and then begin to compare additional email efforts against that benchmark (while always keeping an eye on industry averages).

6 More Thorny Data Problems That Vex B-to-B Marketers, and How to Solve Them

B-to-B data continues to challenge marketers, who need to identify and communicate with customers and prospects, but who run into thorny issues every day. Problems range from duplicates, to key-entry errors, to missing data elements, and beyond. Recently, Bernice Grossman and I worked with a group of savvy B-to-B marketers at a DMA conference to compile a list of difficult data problems. Here are six that will bring tears to your eyes—but don’t worry, we also offer some solutions.

B-to-B data continues to challenge marketers, who need to identify and communicate with customers and prospects, but who run into thorny issues every day. Problems range from duplicates, to key-entry errors, to missing data elements, and beyond. Recently, Bernice Grossman and I worked with a group of savvy B-to-B marketers at a DMA conference to compile a list of difficult data problems. Here are six that will bring tears to your eyes—but don’t worry, we also offer some solutions.

  1. How do I find out the names of individuals who visit my website?
    There are two ways to de-anonymize the website visit. First, add a registration invitation to your site. This could be an email sign-up, or a piece of gated content, like a white paper or research report, in exchange for providing important data elements like name, title, company name, address, phone and email.
    Second, use the IP address to identify the company from which the visitor arrived. This can be done by hand, using Google Analytics, or more easily by using any number of services that enable IP address look-up. Marketing automation systems are increasingly baking this option into their tools.

    But the IP address method will still not get you the name of the visitor. You can infer the visitor’s interests and, possibly, role by looking at the time spent on various pages. And you can drop a cookie and retarget the visitor with text or banner ads later.

  2. Job titles are increasingly inconsistent-and proliferating. Categories like marketing manager and financial analyst don’t seem to work anymore.
    Several companies offer job title standardization services, called something like title mapping, title translation or title beautification. A resource like that is a good first step.

    Then, consider sending an outbound email, perhaps with a follow-up phone call, positioned as a “contact verification” message. Invite the target to indicate his or her functional job title, from a list.

    After that, you will be left with a relatively smaller list of remaining titles. At that point, you need to decide on a default for the rest of them. For example, anything that sounds like IT will go in an IT functional bucket. And, depending on how often you query your customers, you can always gather answers to this question over time.

    Then, you are faced with the remaining issue, which is far more difficult, namely the crazy new titles that some people are using these days. We’ve seen bizarre titles like Chief Instigating Officer and Marketing Diva. With these, you have two options.

    • Force aberrant titles into your standards, by hand, using your best guess. Use a default code for anything you can’t really figure out.
    • Leave them as they are, and link them to a table of standardized job functions. But maintain the self-reported wacky title, too, so you can still address the person the way he or she wants to be addressed.

    You might also consider using forced drop-down menus for job function and job title, at the point of key entry.

  3. How should I handle job changes? When an employee leaves and goes to another company, does his or her history with my company go along?
    We are going to assume—a big assumption—that you actually know the person has gone to a new company. It’s more likely that you will not know. This is why it’s a good idea to do periodic de-duplications by functional title to get a sense of new names that have popped up at the companies in your database.

    When you know that there is a job change and you have the new information, you must move the contact to the new company in your database. It’s a good idea to send along behavioral data like communications preferences. You might also add a LinkedIn profile URL to the record. If you believe the prior behavioral data is important, then take it as a duplicate, and put it in a separate field, not attributing it to the new company record.

    The purchase history belongs with the original company, and should stay there. Indicate in the company record that the individual has left.
    As a general rule, in marketing databases, never overwrite. Keep everything data stamped.

  4. We want our sales people to be selling, and keep administrative tasks to a minimum. But these people are also the closest resources to our customers. How can we motivate them to capture important data about the customers and prospects they are interacting with?
    Boil down the mission to just one or two key data points that reps are asked to collect and report. Job title, buying role and email address are among the most likely to change, and perhaps the most important to keep current. Train and reward the reps on consistent reporting on the selected elements.
  5. In an effort to improve web-form response rates, we are asking for only name and email address. What’s the best way to create a company record in this situation?
    We recommend that you consider hiring a service that will fill in the company record on the spot, as a start. Or send the file out to a third party compiler to append the records you need.

    Another way is to parse the email address. Take the letters after the @ and before the .com. For example, if the email is formatted as firstname.lastname@hp.com, the meaningful letters are hp. Search for other emails with these letters in this position in your file, and build a business rule that every email with these letters shall be assigned that company name. If you have a standard record on your file, import it.

    If the email address is a generic one, like gmail.com or yahoo.com, it’s more difficult. Email the prospect and ask for more data. You could also consider preventing email addresses other than those from company domains from being accepted on the web form. But keep in mind that there is some evidence that individuals filling out web forms with personal email addresses tend to be more responsive over time.

  6. We need to get our international customer data under control. Where should we start?
    First, add country name as a required field in your web forms and other response vehicles, so that future data collection will be set. Use a dropdown menu to improve capture of a standardized country name. Prevent the record from moving forward until the country is specified.

    Then, look at what parts of the world you do business in. Estimate how many countries, and how many customer records in each country, so you can see how big an issue this is.

    Then, figure out which records in the database are non-U.S. This will take some effort. Many databases don’t have a non-domestic indicator. There is no easy way around it.

    Country names are increasingly important as laws change. Consider Canada’s onerous new email law, which requires proven opt in before emailing. You can’t assume that those email addresses ending with .ca are the only Canadian emails on your file. One suggestion is to update your web forms with a message like “If you are in Canada, opt in here.”

You can find more thorny data issues and solutions in our new white paper, available for free download. Please submit any other issues you may be facing, using the comments section here, and we’ll be happy to suggest some solutions.

I Dare You: Create a Brand Challenge!

Challenging something we do quite naturally and easily is indeed the perfect challenge. We all get into ruts—some even good and well-intentioned! Challenging ourselves to reflect, relook and rethink why we do what we do (or don’t do) can be just the process we need to achieve something different, something unexpected, and quite possibly, even something more.

When I popped into my local independent bookstore this week, I saw a slip of paper promoting The 2015 Reading Challenge. Intrigued, I read through a list of eclectic reading prompts, wondering if they’d be of any interest to me because I already am a highly self-motivated bookworm, and always have been. The only prompt I need is to not read 24/7! But I kept an open mind and read through prompts like the following:

  • Read a book from your childhood
  • Read a book in a genre you don’t typically read
  • Read a book you’ve been meaning to read
  • Read a book published this year
  • Read a book you should have read in high school

I changed my mind after reading the list and realized that challenging something we do quite naturally and easily is indeed the perfect challenge. We all get into ruts—some even good and well-intentioned! Challenging ourselves to reflect, relook and rethink why we do what we do (or don’t do) can be just the process we need to achieve something different, something unexpected, and quite possibly, even something more.

These reading prompts made me think of how I gently provoke my clients when I am in the midst of leading brand tune-ups. “Look up! Look around! Look sideways!” I encourage. “What has changed in your marketplace? With your customers? With your product line? Your promotional offers? Your marketing communications? With your competitors? With YOU?” I ask. We grapple with these challenges together, always wanting to examine and understand status quo before dreaming big.

In that creative and open spirit, why not, as a brand leader, create your own Brand Challenge? Make a list of all sorts of prompts that may both ignite new brand behavior and reexamine old behavior. Review with your team and then just jump into it! Here are just a few ideas to get you started:

  • Call a customer and have a meaningful conversation about their brand experience and insights.
  • Clean out your brand closet … what do you need to let go of?
  • Take a BrandAbout field trip and visit five brands not at all related to yours. See what you learn.
  • Take a BrandAbout field trip and visit five brands very much related to yours. See what you learn.
  • Make a branding TO DON’T LIST.
  • Figure out your brand verb.
  • Take a customer service person out to lunch and LISTEN to their experiences.
  • Simplify one process.
  • Spend a day in another department.
  • Find something interesting that your brand did 5 years ago, 10 years ago.
  • Eliminate one thing that does not enhance your brand.
  • Get a reverse mentor in some area.
  • Send a thank you to someone internally.
  • Send a thank you to a customer.

That’s it. I dare you!

Converting Your Social Media Triple-Fs: Friends, Followers and Fans

I’ve heard many gurus, marketers and publishers brag about their social media followers. They’ll say things like, “Isn’t it great … I’ve got 10,000 fans on Facebook” or “I have more than 15,000 followers on Twitter.” Then I’ll ask them how many free e-newsletter subscribers they have. And they’ll reply, “I haven’t had time to build a list yet. I don’t have an e-newsletter.”

I’ve heard many gurus, marketers and publishers brag about their social media followers. They’ll say things like, “Isn’t it great … I’ve got 10,000 fans on Facebook” or “I have more than 15,000 followers on Twitter.” Then I’ll ask them how many free e-newsletter subscribers they have. And they’ll reply, “I haven’t had time to build a list yet. I don’t have an e-newsletter.”

Well, in my opinion, they’ve won only half the battle …

It’s fantastic that they have a following on social media—people who seem to be interested in their messages (posts) and their overall philosophy. They can certainly cultivate these relationships to assist in their marketing efforts. However, I remind these gurus that the “fans” are following them. It’s a passive relationship. And there’s an awful lot of background noise in a news feed that can distract their fans.

If you don’t have fans’ email addresses, then you cannot have one-on-one communications with them. Building and cultivating a list is a fundamental business strategy for sales growth.

In the publishing world, a list (email addresses of free or paid subscribers) is sacred. It’s one of the most valuable things you own. You protect it and treat it with care, because your list is your financial bread and butter. It’s made up of people—customers and subscribers—who can make or break your business through their purchasing power or lack thereof.

Your list is also your leverage—what you use when reaching out to other synergistic publishers and friendly competitors to do reciprocal JV (joint venture) swaps and revenue share deals.

So, if you’re an online publisher, guru or business owner who has social media followers but no list, you’re at a disadvantage. Initiate a plan to capture your fans’ email addresses immediately and get permission to open up the personal lines of communication.

I recommend that you make a special conversion effort to encourage social media followers to give you their email addresses, or, as we say, “opt in” to receive your marketing messages.

This typically involves creating strong promotional copy and a lead-generation landing page (also know as squeeze page), where the goal is to capture the email address of the friend, follower or fan.

The offer should be something that will resonate with your fan, such as a useful and relevant free bonus. Some popular examples are a whitepaper, e-newsletter or e-alert subscription, audio download, bonus video, webinar or teleseminar..

Some marketers also offer coupon codes or gift certificates in exchange for an email address or the option to be in a “VIP club,” where you’re the first to hear about special offers.

Freebies will vary based on what you have to offer in exchange. Ideally, this is something that has a perceived value and is immediate and relevant. You run the campaign for a two-week period at a time, mixing your conversion messages with your regular, organic daily posts. It’s ideal to drive traffic to specially coded pages so you can track traffic and conversions. You can also make sure your sign up box on your website’s home page is up and ready for stray organic traffic. Then you monitor email sign-ups and website traffic (via Google Analytics), to ensure list growth and traffic source referrals.

Aside from captivating copy, many variables come into play to make sure the effort is successful. These include making sure email collection fields are at the top, middle and bottom of the lead-generation landing page being used, as well as in a static (fixed) location on your website. There should also be links to your privacy policy and an assurance statement alleviating any concern about email addresses being rented or sold to third parties.

It’s also critical to clearly disclose before users submit their email addresses that opting in to receive your freebie also gives them a complimentary subscription to your e-newsletter (if applicable), along with special offers from time to time.

Finally, you should follow up with a series of autoresponder (targeted messages) emails welcoming your new subscribers, reminding them how they signed up, offering strong editorial content and special new subscriber offers.

These emails facilitate bonding; validate that the correct email was sent; ensures that the user is aware of the sign up; helps reduce false “do not mail” reports, email bounces and general attrition; and most importantly, improved life time value.

So before you get enamored with your Facebook following, realize that to monetize these names takes a conversion strategy. Once you start building your list, you’ll add a whole new value to your businesses valuation.