Are You Meeting Your Customers’ Mobile Needs?

Most of the U.S. population — 61 percent — say they use mobile phones for shopping activities, according to the 2017 Synchrony Financial Digital Study recently completed. But, what would resonate with them in terms of digital marketing and more importantly, what would drive their behavior?

Game Changing TechAs modern marketers, we put a lot of thought and effort into our digital marketing programs. The goals are to promote engagement with our brands, drive traffic to our website or encourage customers to walk into a store. Many times, the goal is all three.

Most of the U.S. population — 61 percent — say they use mobile phones for shopping activities, according to the 2017 Synchrony Financial Digital Study recently completed. But, what would resonate with them in terms of digital marketing and more importantly, what would drive their behavior? Based on the referenced survey, there are specific elements of mobile marketing that consumers tell they are interested in.

Significantly, 50 percent of consumers said if their favorite retailer sent offers to their mobile devices, they would shop there more often. Mobile marketing can include in-app messages, push notifications, beacon / location based offers, SMS messages and voice recognition.

Given this consumer interest, how many companies are investing in mobile technology? The answer is, it depends. According to “The State Of Digital: A Mobile Commerce Perspective: Forrester’s H2 2016 Global Mobile Executive Online Survey” by Forrester, nearly 70 percent of marketers say they are regularly using responsive Web design and mobile optimized websites. It seems that most companies have the basics of mobile user experience down pat. But fewer companies are actively marketing via mobile. Only about 40 percent regularly use SMS messaging or push notifications, and only one in three use in-app messages.

Another element of mobile marketing that consumers express interest in is location-based marketing. Almost half (46 percent) of all consumers said they would like to get relevant offers based on their location. This is overwhelmingly driven by millennials. For instance, 61 percent of those ages 18 to 25 would like location-based offers, steadily declining for each age group (only about a quarter of those 66 or over said this is the case).

But only 37 percent of marketers are using push notifications and an even smaller percentage (only 12 percent) are regularly using beacon/location support on mobile phones, according to the same Forrester study referenced above. There are certainly restrictions on SMS marketing (consult your legal advisor as to the permissions required), but some companies are still planning to implement these programs — about a quarter are planning to pilot/test SMS messaging, and 35 percent are planning to pilot/test push notifications in the future.

Mobile marketing is clearly an imperative for companies with large numbers of millennials in their current or target consumer base. And remember, Gen Z’s, the true mobile natives, are fast approaching behind the millennial population. They may be even more comfortable with mobile marketing than their millennial older siblings. Investments in mobile technology will certainly be crucial for many more marketers as these populations expect more from their favorite brands.

With the constantly evolving field of smartphone technology, people become more and more enamored of using their phone for anything and everything. Digital marketers are challenged to provide “delighters” to attract and engage the population that is most interested in using this technology. Successful digital marketing programs listen to the customer and proactively engage them, whenever and wherever they happen to be.

Note: The views expressed in this blog are those of the blogger and not necessarily of Synchrony Financial. All references to consumers and population refer to the survey respondents from the Synchrony Financial 2017 Digital Study unless otherwise noted.

Zeroing in on Your Consumers With Geo-Marketing

Mobile geo-marketing is growing at a rapid rate. This growth is driven by applications such as navigation, local search and social networking, as well as the public’s understanding of location-based marketing. With the increasing comfort level of sharing location data, brands are turning to location-based marketing to tap into consumers’ behavior to deliver more timely, personalized mobile experiences

Mobile geo-marketing is growing at a rapid rate. This growth is driven by applications such as navigation, local search and social networking, as well as the public’s understanding of location-based marketing. With the increasing comfort level of sharing location data, brands are turning to location-based marketing to tap into consumers’ behavior to deliver more timely, personalized mobile experiences.

Geo-marketing comes in a variety of flavors that utilize different technologies depending on how you are communicating with your consumers:

  • Geo-Fencing: This method is essentially a “virtual fence” designed to enclose a specific area for a marketing purpose. For example, a retailer can run a geo-fencing campaign where they “fence” in an area around their stores for the purpose of pulling in consumers who are near, but not shopping at their stores. Geo-fencing is not location detection in itself, but the geo-fences you setup—and the business rules you define as to what message to communicate to consumers when they are inside, or outside, those geo-fences—can be leveraged in conjunction with location detection capabilities.
  • Broad-Range Location: Some campaigns can leverage general area, such as city or ZIP code, to determine the right message to communicate. For example, an airline simply needs to know the metro area a consumer is closest to in order to personalize offers for flights out of the nearest airport. Location detection in this case does not need to be highly accurate to get the job done, and can generally be supported through most any mobile interaction.
  • Geo-Conquesting: This specific method of geo-targeting allows businesses to capture consumer spend away from competitors. The effectiveness of these campaigns can be further enhanced if the technology partner you are working with can layer on additional data that helps to understand the consumer better, such as third party sources that identify likelihood to purchase certain types of product.

For this article, let’s focus on geo-fencing. What you need to know is that geo-fencing simply needs to be paired up with a location detection technology, such as GPS or carrier network triangulation. Once detected to be inside a geo-fenced area, a brand can then alert potential customers who may not have visited your store otherwise. Retailers can also choose to send information, such as directions to the store, or run hyper-local promotions.

Retailer Takes Geo-Fencing to the Next Level
Belk, the nation’s largest family owned and operated department store, has added geo-fencing to drive in-store traffic and increase revenue across all of their stores by selecting very specific times, like major holidays (Easter and Mother’s Day) or sales (Belk Days) to geo-target customers with time sensitive coupons. For example, coupons for 20 percent off between the hours of 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. were sent out to customers who were near a Belk store to act now before the coupon expires. By offering relevant, time-based coupons, Belk has been able to grow their mobile marketing database and target real customers more effectively.

More Data, No Problems
Today, GPS, Wi-Fi and Bluetooth-enabled smartphones are capable of aggregating and sharing huge amounts of data. This data is very helpful for marketers to get a better understanding of their consumers’ behavior and target them in a more relevant manner.

Geo-Fenced data can then be used to see which offers and locations actually attract more customers, and whether that translates into more sales. Other possible metrics include the effectiveness of advertising, how often a customer visits the store, and how long they shop for. Additionally, geo-fencing can lead to better customer rewards programs. Once you know where your customers are and how they behave, you can encourage and reward them effortlessly.

Geo-fencing gives the customer a much more personalized interaction with brands by offering them timely, relevant offers via their mobile devices. 

Although privacy has been a concern in the past, recent surveys show that customers are happy to trade their personal information in favor of receiving special offers —but it needs to be additive, not intrusive. If it’s done right geo-fencing will revolutionize location-based sales and drive customer loyalty.