4 Benefits of Applying Marketing Analytics

Marketing analytics is no small subject in today’s world of business. In fact, according to Transparency Market Research, the marketing analytics industry is set to grow by roughly 14% by 2022. Why such growth? Marketing analytics has a tremendous impact on a marketing organization’s activities, but also on a brand’s overall understanding of their entire company’s success.

Marketing analytics is no small subject in today’s world of business. In fact, according to Transparency Market Research, the marketing analytics industry is set to grow by roughly 14% by 2022. Why such growth? Marketing analytics has a tremendous impact on a marketing organization’s activities, but also on a brand’s overall understanding of their entire company’s success.

There are four unique benefits marketing analytics provides, and combined together, these benefits give a holistic view of an organization’s past, present and future.

But First: What Is Marketing Analytics and Why Is It Important?

Marketing analytics is a result of the technology and influx of data we use as marketers. Early on, marketing analytics was a relatively simple concept. It encompassed the process of evaluating marketing efforts from multiple data sources, processes or technology to understand the effectiveness of marketing activities from a big-picture view — often through the use of metrics. Fundamentally, it’s all about quantifying the results of marketing efforts that take place both online and offline.

Today, marketing analytics has become an entire industry that’s changing the way we work and the type of work we do as marketers. 

It’s important to measure the financial impact of not just marketing but of a variety of efforts from product and sales — which marketing analytics also can provide. As a result, knowing and understanding the different types of analysis and the benefits they provide within marketing analytics, can help to identify what metrics to focus on for what objectives — because objectives can be an endless list of how to understand or increase ROI, monitor trends over time, determine campaign effectiveness, forecast future results, and so on.

The 4 Benefits of Applying Marketing Analytics

1. Learn What Happened

Marketing analytics can first lend insight into what happened in the past and why. This is instrumental to marketing teams in order to avoid making the same mistakes. Through descriptive analysis and the use of customer relationship management and marketing automation platforms, analytics bring to light not only what happened in the past but also provide answers to questions on specific topics. For example, you can ask more about why a specific metric performed the way it did, or what impacted the sales of a specific product.

2. Gauge What’s Happening Now

Marketing analytics can also help you understand what’s currently taking place in regards to your marketing efforts. This helps determine if you need to pivot or quickly make changes in order to avoid mistakes or make improvements. Using dashboards to display current engagements in an email track or the status of new leads are examples of marketing analytics that look to assess the real-time status of marketing efforts. Usually, these dashboards are created by employing business intelligence practices in addition to a marketing automation platform.

3. Predict What Might Happen

Some could say the predictive aspect of marketing analytics is the most important part of it. Through predictive modelings such as regression analysis, clustering, propensity models and collaborative filtering, we can start to anticipate consumer behavior. Web analytics tracking that incorporates probabilities, for example, can be used to foresee when a person may leave a site and when. Marketers can then utilize this information to execute specific marketing tactics at those moments to retain customers.

Or perhaps it’s marketing analytics that assesses lead management processes to prioritize leads based on those similar to current customers. This helps identifies who already has a higher propensity to buy. Either way, the goal of marketing analytics for the future will be to move away from a rear-view strategy to focus on the future. Luckily, the influx of data, machine learning, and improved statistical algorithms mean our ability to accurately predict the likelihood of future outcomes will rise exponentially.

4. Optimize Efforts

This last benefit only comes when you combine your analytics with your market research objectives — but if you do so you could see the greatest impact. In fact, if you’re not ensuring your marketing analytics and market research work together, then you could be missing out on a lot of opportunities. Essentially, it’s about translating marketing analytics findings into market research objectives. A common mistake marketers make in conducting marketing analytics is forgetting to gather real customer feedback. This activity is important to bridge the gap between analytics insights, a marketing strategy and activation.

In addition to the first three benefits or approaches, brands should use marketing research as a tool to push their marketing analytics from just learning about lead generation and sales metrics to actually understand customers in the context of their marketing opportunities.

Great Marketing Analytics Can’t Drive Managerial Courage

Great marketing analytics can’t drive managerial courage, but the reverse is true. Recently, I decided to have coffee with an old acquaintance of mine. He has been in almost every company imaginable and has such a specialized role that he is in constant demand.

Great marketing analytics can’t drive managerial courage, but the reverse is true.

Recently, I decided to have coffee with an old acquaintance of mine. He has been in almost every company imaginable and has such a specialized role that he is in constant demand. Every few years, there is an explosion on innovative management books designed to put him out of business — yet he remains in high demand.

Nobody was already at the café when I arrived. He was sitting in the middle of the café wearing a shiny grey suit, black shirt and sunglasses perched on his slicked-back salt and pepper hair, purposefully baiting my awe and contempt. He flashed a big toothy grin as I approached.

“Hi, ‘Nobody.’ I hope I did not keep you waiting,” I said, trying to hide my disdain.

“Nah, it’s all good,” he replied. “I was just people watching.”

“So what have you been up to?” I asked.

“Same old, same old … consulting business is as good as ever.” To punctuate his point, he grinned and leaned back with hands behind his head, as if he were ready to fall back into a hammock.

“Yeah, tell me what you do, again?” I asked.

“My consultancy focuses on accountability. It is really a simple model. When something breaks down in the workplace, or there is a failure to perform, I am called in to take accountability. Usually, when I show up, people will be stressed out. The guilty parties think someone else is responsible or are looking to share the blame, leadership does not want to create a toxic environment, and everyone wants to just move on. As a result, I come in. Everyone points to me, and they agree that it is Nobody’s fault.”

“Wow! And what do you charge for this service?”

“Depends, but it is usually a large percentage of gross revenue or net profit, depending on the size and type of failure I assume responsibility for. Business is great!”

My memory of our last conversation is suddenly jarred.

“That’s right; last we talked, we discussed how the wave of data-driven management was going to put you out of business. Wasn’t there some concern that measurement and analytics were the new wave of human capital management and that through measurement, greater accountability would come about?”

“Nobody” brightened up and leaned forward. His eyes opened up and his jaw slackened in awe of his luck.

“Yeah, that was what I was afraid of,” he said, “but it turns out, this big data threat has turned out to be a big hoax. You see, I was not called in because accountability was difficult; I was called in because accountability was icky. No amount of data and measurement will help my clients generate a healthy approach toward accountability if they don’t have the vision of what good accountability looks like. “

I had always disliked Nobody. While he feared the disinfecting power of data, I spent a good part of my career preaching the gospel of insightful data. I had always seen him as a Luddite; someone unaware and clinging to old ways. However, after this insightful confession, I found a sudden rush of respect for him. He knew things about business that I was now just learning for myself.

“Nobody, you are right,” I said. “I don’t deal with accountability directly, but I am often asked to help clients with data-driven customer strategy and marketing effectiveness. I have found that the analytics part is easy. However, it is often lack of clarity, purpose, and vision that prevents data and analytics from being effective.”

He smugly flashes that familiar, self-satisfied, toothy grin and instinctively my resentment reappears. However this time, it’s a different resentment. This time, my disdain is seeded with a healthy and well-deserved sense of respect and fear.

“You know your business model is still destined for obsolescence,” I insist. “It is just a matter of time. Wait till artificial intelligence shows up.” I am embarrassed as soon as the words part my lips. I feel small and helpless, like a kid fighting off a bully by threatening to call in an older sibling.

“Nobody” senses the change in our dynamic. He leans in closer than at any time in our conversation. Like a Bond villain, secure in his advantage, unafraid to share a horrifying truth.

“YOU-DON’T-GET-IT.” He pauses after each word, maximizing the dramatic effect, entirely playing out the Bond villain cliché.

“Data, AI, analytics — none of this matters, unless you have the courage and vision to use it in transformative ways. In fact, in this data-driven age, managers are so enamored by what they CAN do, it is hard to think about what they SHOULD do. As a result, my friend, managerial courage and vision are harder than ever. ”

Damn, he’s good.

Analytics Isn’t Reporting

Today, virtually all organizations have challenges in effectively leveraging analytics to drive business performance. Odds are pretty good that when you read that statement, you thought of at least one example in your organization. Perhaps you thought about the systemic contribution that analytics is making or a frustration you’ve had with analytics performance. If so, you’re hardly alone.

Today, virtually all organizations have challenges in effectively leveraging analytics to drive business performance.

Odds are pretty good that when you read that statement, you thought of at least one example in your organization. Perhaps you thought about the systemic contribution that analytics is making or a frustration you’ve had with analytics performance. If so, you’re hardly alone.

Here’s my home base for thinking about “analytics” in your organization.

“The promise of marketing analytics isn’t esoteric, or abstract — it’s fundamentally simple — analytics generates evidence of problem or opportunity that can be used to drive a specific business impact.”

Yet marketing analytics all too often fails to live up to its full potential. When it comes to the Web, almost a decade after the advent of mass adoption of Web analytics platforms like Google Analytics, engagement and conversion rates are still struggling to make methodical progress forward, and bring the business to materially greater profitability.

One of the biggest errors in strategy is the inadvertent substitution of “reporting,” or even “dashboards,” for a robust analytics process. It helps to first appreciate how subtle that difference is and why it happens:

  1. Analytics Is Interesting. Analytics can be intellectually stimulating, but some individuals and organizations spend too much time in the rapture of how interesting all that data can be. I was recently at an event where a smart young woman had a name badge on that said “I love data” below her name. I was tempted to write “I make money with the data” under my own.

    While I’ll be the first to express a life-long affair with the database and discovering “interesting” things in the data, that’s just not enough. So we have to monitor when analytics isn’t producing the evidence we need to affect change and deliver a business impact. While that can take a tremendous amount of work, the purpose itself must remain clear to create value.

  2. Reports Don’t Always Have the Right Questions Behind Them. Most of us came up in business generating and reading reports. I confess that I remember craving a report we used to call “the blue book” (if you still remember paper). I looked forward to every week when I ran my business line off of it in a large company that razed many a forest generating blue books. Thankfully, they email them now — but these reports are the same static, one-dimensional view of the business, many years later.

    The problem comes when we see our “standard reports” as the answer, even if the question we should be asking has changed.

    When you’re dealing with fickle consumers, and infinite choice is a click away, those questions sometimes change faster than “reporting standards” can realistically keep up with.

  3. The Relevancy Is Gone. Better than 80 percent of the time, I see marketing organizations with ample “stats” on their historical activity — yet they often fundamentally lack a strategic big picture and framework to consistently improve marketing and business decision-making. Frequently, the same organizations struggled with aligning the technical implementation of analytics and metrics required to drive business growth.

  4. Continuous Business Improvement Sometimes Requires a Cultural Shift. Cultural shifts of any size aren’t trivial, of course. I recently attended an all-day digital commerce strategy summit at a large brand I’ve done strategy work with during the past year. Dozens of staff, vendors and executives attended. The ultimate revelation for some of these executives who made the six-figure investment in the event was, “this requires patience, and is very methodical and testing-based” — it took a huge amount of effort, resources and time. To the credit of the executive who sponsored this event, a necessary cultural shift was recognized. While all in attendance knew intuitively about “test-optimize-learn” and had a large investment in their analytics software platform — she recognized that her organization was playing catch-up culturally — an achievement in itself.

5. Prioritization Is Key. Many large and more traditional organizations have very deep roots in a task- and reporting-based culture. This stifles Data Athletes from doing their jobs. Prioritization is key. As the old saying goes, “If everything is a priority, nothing is a priority.” Executive sponsors need to make choices on where to dial effort back; focus can then be applied to build a point of view based on evidence, and the opportunity to create and discover the context of opportunity and problems.

Forward vs. Backward Analysis.
Very frequently, I’ve helped organizations that started analytics processes or programs by looking “backward” at tactical reports; these reports can only show if a past tactic has or hasn’t worked. You cannot tell if a different tactic or mix of tactics would have done better, and by how much. Worse yet, the very volume of these “reports” often obscures the bigger picture. The solution … Look forward.

Analytics Should Be Forward-Looking. It’s driven not only by analyzing the past, but by creating a framework for planning and creating future performance. In other words, what to test, how to test it, and how to use the results of those tests to drive continuous improvements in the business.

In short, analytics done well creates visibility into what you should be doing and suggests the delta with what you are currently doing. Think about the aforementioned necessity for prioritization — Analytics done well helps you set those priorities.

Analytics professionals and and the executive team must all work together according to one principle:

Analytics is the process of identifying truths from data.
These truths inform decisions that measurably improve business performance.

Analytics Must Be Purpose-Driven.
Here’s a simple approach to create focus and align the specific implementation of analytics to serve you and your business growth:

  • Your business’s Purpose drives specific Business Objectives.
  • Those Business Objectives, in turn, inform Goals.
  • Your Goals are tracked via KPIs.
  • The KPIs are continuously compared against Benchmarks.

It’s easy to dive into the weeds, get lost in the data, lose patience with the process, and begin a bottom-up approach. This deceptively simple framework I’ve suggested will help you take a top-down approach to analytics that ensures you are measuring the right things — correctly. When you do, you will become a true analytics-driven organization.

Doing so will help your organization grow faster, more consistently and reliably — and that makes for a valuable and happier organization. Be a Data Athlete, not an analytics nerd — and you’ll make all the difference in your organization.