WWTT? Post-Pandemic Vacation Daydreams Courtesy of Discover Puerto Rico

It’s not a question that COVID-19 has devastated multiple industries, but maybe one of the hardest hit has been travel and hospitality. While it might be hard to answer the question of should these brands be working on advertising right now, there is room for some thoughtful post-pandemic vacation messaging.

It’s not a question that COVID-19 has devastated multiple industries, but maybe one of the hardest hit has been travel and hospitality. From airlines to hotels to destinations big and small, they’ve all felt the pain, and are trying to figure out what they can do to stay in business and keep their employees safe and on staff. While it might be hard to answer the question of should these brands be working on advertising, I think there is room for some thoughtful post-pandemic vacation messaging.

The weather is gradually warming up in Philadelphia — usually by now I have a trip planned for May/June, with more mini-trip planning speckled out through the summer. But thanks to COVID-19, those plans and daydreams have been set aside. And not just for me — for pretty much everyone. So when Puerto Rico’s nonprofit destination marketing organization (DMO) Discover Puerto Rico reached out about a new campaign, I was intrigued (and ready to look at something other than the inside of my apartment).

Discover Puerto Rico’s newest campaign, “All in Good Time” has a simple, yet clear, message: “Right now, it’s time for patience, but soon enough it will be time for paradise — all in good time.”

Discover Puerto Rico’s series of videos are available on YouTube, and the marketing campaign will run across the DMO’s social channels, including Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter.

In an interview with CMO Leah Chandler, she explained that the campaign’s sentiment will remain “All in Good Time” until travel restrictions on the island loosen — then it will shift. ” … messaging will shift from ‘All in Good Time’ to ‘It’s Time for Puerto Rico,'” states Chandler. “We’ll carefully evaluate before this shift is made to ensure we market the Island responsibly.”

“‘All in Good Time’ is about reminding travelers that as much as we would love to host them, we know it’s not the right time,” Chandler shares. “Now is the time to stay safe, and soon it’ll be time to come explore our beautiful Island – ‘All in Good Time.’ We wanted to make clear that we’re in this together. The elements highlighted are, similarly, some of which truly define Puerto Rico – the hidden natural wonders of the Island.”

I appreciate that there’s no hard-sell of this campaign. No “get your plans squared away now so you can book as soon as travel restrictions lift!” Instead, the campaign is a gentle reminder of Puerto Rico’s natural beauty and place as a desirable vacation destination. It feels like a permission slip to let your mind wander and daydream a bit about a post-pandemic vacation, something I think we all could use.

But, in the meantime, Discover Puerto Rico is offering several virtual events via Instagram Live and Facebook Live. These are fantastic opportunities for people interested in Puerto Rico to go on virtual tours, and could end up converting them to booking clients once travel is possible.

Again, it’s about offering value, and Discover Puerto Rico is doing a good job of that while being unable to welcome physical visitors to the Island.

What do you think marketers? Having any post-pandemic vacation daydreams of your own? Drop me a line in the comments below, and stay tuned for a Q&A with Discover Puerto Rico’s CMO Leah Chandler in the next week or so as we dig more into this campaign and how the DMO is handling COVID-19.

WWTT? Jimmy John’s Wants to Buy You a House

Yes, you read that right. Illinois-based sandwich chain restaurant Jimmy John’s recently launched a campaign that will have possibly anyone who can’t afford a home in 70% of the U.S. clamoring to participate in.

Yes, you read that right. Illinois-based sandwich chain restaurant Jimmy John’s recently launched a campaign that will have possibly anyone who can’t afford a home in 70% of the U.S. clamoring to participate in. The Dream Home in the Zone campaign’s focus is to put a lucky winner into one of their delivery zones, which are determined to be anywhere within a 5-minute radius of one of Jimmy John’s 2,800 locations.

https://youtu.be/56M3uSyPCdI

The basics of the campaign is that if you live outside of a Jimmy John’s delivery zone, you are eligible to enter the contest for up to $250,000 to purchase a home within one of the zones. To do so, you have to provide the usual information of name, address, email address, etc., as well as a mini essay of 250 words explaining why you want to relocate into a Jimmy John’s delivery zone.

According to the official rules, the contest runs from Aug. 12 to Oct. 4, and 500 entries will be selected RANDOMLY. Those 500 entries will then go on to the submission review, evaluation and judging process. Ten finalists will be notified, and then follows the finalists interviews, and from that the final decision will be made, and by the end of the year that lucky winner should be celebrating the winter holidays in their new home … maybe with some celebratory Jimmy John’s sandwiches?

Jimmy John’s worked with its agency of record WorkInProgress on this campaign, and hail it as further support of their mission to only deliver the freshest of sandwiches to customers (something they covered in a previous campaign earlier this year). Hence the delivery zones.

I wonder how many people will apply because they simply want to be home owners, Jimmy John’s delivery zone status or not. Especially amid a housing crisis, winning a contest like this could be make-or-break for a person, couple, or family.

I have a feeling this campaign will carry plenty of buzz around it, and if exposure is enough for Jimmy John’s, then they should get it in spades. But will that turn into ROI? We shall have to see. Let me know your thoughts in the comments below!

How to Sell $38K of Subscriptions in 10 Days

If you’re a paid circulation magazine, you know that selling subscriptions online can be a challenge. However, I’d like to share an example of one publication that recently sold over $38K of subscriptions in just 10 days — and the subscription campaign strategy we used to do it.

If you run a paid circulation magazine, you know that selling subscriptions online can be a challenge. However, I’d like to share an example of one publication that recently sold over $38K of subscriptions in just 10 days — and the strategy used to do it.

The magazine we’re talking about isn’t a huge, national publication like Consumer Reports or America’s Test Kitchen. It’s actually a relatively modest, regional lifestyle publication and a member of CRMA (City and Regional Magazine Association).

The publisher’s website isn’t geared at all to drive subscriptions. They have no paywall in place, no digital subscription option, and no way to easily create effective landing pages. They also have an email/marketing automation system that is difficult to use at best.

Yet the team there overcame all of these challenges and, together, we ran a very successful campaign that generated $38K of subscriptions at an initial subscription price of only $11.

A Huge Boost in Paid Subscriptions

The magazine I worked with typically sells 10 subscriptions per day through various channels. However, during the campaign, that average jumped to 69 subscriptions per day … nearly 7x more. Look at the data and you can clearly see the day the campaign started and ended.

Subscription Campaign Success: Chart 1

In the 10 days prior to the campaign, the publisher sold $1,995 of subscriptions. During the 10-day campaign, however, they sold nearly $7,546 of subscriptions. So how does that equate to the $38K I mentioned above?

The publisher’s subscriptions include a non-optional, auto-renew program. That means that they don’t have to re-sell these subscribers every year. Thus, each auto-renew subscription is actually worth approximately $56 over the lifetime of the subscriber.

When you look at lifetime value, the magazine normally generated $5,620 in LTV revenue over a typical 10-day period. But during this 10-day campaign, they generated over $38,000 in LTV revenue … a 7x increase.

Subscription Campaign Success: Chart 2

How the Subscription Campaign Worked

The campaign offered a 50% discount on the normal annual subscription price and made it very clear that the offer was only good for 10 days. This combination of a steep price discount and the urgency of a limited time helped contribute to the campaign’s success.

But the other major factor was how well the publisher drove awareness of the discount and the limited time through all available channels that the magazine had: email, ads on their website, and social media. They also spent $1,000 in Facebook/Instagram advertising targeting a specific demographic in their geographic area as well as re-targeting website visitors and Facebook page followers.

Unsurprisingly, email was the biggest revenue driver accounting for 50% of the directly attributable sales. Ads on the publisher’s website drove 25%, with social media and Facebook/Instagram ads combining for the remaining 25%.

The Campaign Was Part of a Larger Strategy

It’s critical to note that this campaign was part of a larger audience development strategy that we’ve been working on for a while. The campaign wouldn’t have been anywhere near as successful as an isolated subscription sales effort.

The audience development strategy focuses first on building their email list. We create high-converting lead magnets that are promoted to their target audience with Facebook and Instagram advertising. Once an email address is captured, the person is then presented with an opportunity to subscribe to the magazine.

This allows the publisher to quickly build up their email list for free. They make as much money in year-one subscription revenue as they spend on advertising. When you take into account auto-renew lifetime value, the publisher actually makes money while building their email list.

Why is this important?

Their new email names converted at a higher rate than their old email names. The publisher’s pre-existing email list was larger than the new, lead-magnet-generated email list. But the new names converted to paid magazine subscribers more than 3x better than pre-existing names.

What’s Next?

While this campaign was off-the-charts successful, it’s not something that can be done more than a couple times per year. If you do it more often than that, you will condition your audience to wait for a big sale and campaign response rates will fall off dramatically.

Working with the publisher, we plan to do this type of campaign a couple times each year. In the interim, we’ll continue to build out their email list rapidly. They’ll add more evergreen lead magnets and will continue to promote them via Facebook and Instagram. We’re also testing the response rate of other programmatic networks like Google, Taboola, and Bing.

This strategy works with paid circulation publications, e-commerce sites, or membership sites. It can even be adapted for controlled circulation publications with some modifications. It takes work, patience, the right tactics, close monitoring, and perhaps some system changes. But the right combination of ongoing email list development and focused, intense subscription campaigns is a powerful combination for any publication.

For Prospecting Success, Leave Your Data Order Until Later

But when they place an order for prospecting data — whether it’s email, telephone or postal addresses — marketers often end up with data that isn’t exactly what they had in mind. What happens then? They have to order again, wasting time and money. Or worse: They may use the data in a campaign and wind up with suboptimal results.

Web Contact Us Icons Cubes prospecting contactMarketers looking to acquire new customers or generate sales leads typically rely on outside data providers for contact data to give them access to new markets. But when they place an order for prospecting data — whether it’s email, telephone or postal addresses — marketers often end up with data that isn’t exactly what they had in mind. What happens then? They have to order again, wasting time and money. Or worse: They may use the data in a campaign and wind up with suboptimal results.

With a bit of planning and strategy, these problems can be avoided. The secret? Get your prospecting campaign ducks in a row before ordering the data. Think through where you are going and why. Key strategies to consider include:

  • State your campaign objectives, with specific goals and time frames. For example: Generate 45 qualified leads, at $350 per lead, in the quarter.
  • Identify the target audience. A great way to refine your target audience is by profiling your current best customers. Your data vendor may offer profiling as a free service.
  • Select a compelling offer that will motivate the target to respond. Offers are most powerful when they are unique, tangible, perceived as valuable by the prospect and related to the key benefit of your product or service.
  • Determine the key campaign messages. Craft campaign messages based on the key benefits that are valued by your target audience.
  • Plan how you will handle campaign responses and follow up. Plan a series of follow-up messages to deepen the customer relationship, and to stimulate retention, repurchase and referral.
  • Prepare a pro forma estimate of campaign results and ROI. If your pro forma estimate does not show a satisfactory result, then tweak other elements to improve the campaign: Select a narrower, more targeted audience. Find a more compelling offer. Identify more powerful customer benefit statements.

This pre-planning process may seem counterintuitive. You know that the target audience is the single most powerful driver of campaign success, so you’d think that specifying the audience should come first. And that’s true. But experience shows that working through the other elements — the offer, the messaging, the projected results analysis — often results in refinements to your thinking about the audience itself. So don’t actually place the order until you’re comfortable with all the other elements of your campaign.

This article is excerpted from the white paper “How to Place an Order for Prospecting Lists and Data That Ensures You’ll Get Exactly What You Need”. Get your own copy here. A version of this article appeared in Biznology, the digital marketing blog.

12 Design Considerations for Optimized Landing Pages

“It’s just the order card.” I hear this all the time from young creatives and marketers alike. This can be one of the most overlooked parts for a campaign, direct mail package and/or landing page. Yet it shouldn’t be.

“It’s just the order card.” I hear this all the time from young creatives and marketers alike. This can be one of the most overlooked parts for a campaign, direct mail package and/or landing page. Yet it shouldn’t be. That’s your cash register — where you can lose a sale if the messaging is difficult to figure out, hard to complete, and unclear what to do next.

Let’s dive into digital order forms and explore some best practices for how you can design landing pages that will help close the sale instead of frustrating your page visitors.

12 Design Considerations to Optimize Your Landing Pages
1. Roadmap the page:
The layout is critical. Create a clear path for your customers to follow. It should be obvious where to go and what you want them to do step by step.

2. Hit them in the face with a frying pan: Don’t be clever or cute. Be obvious. You have only a few seconds before they get confused, frustrated, lost or simply change their mind.

3. Deliver a clear page headline: Have a headline that clearly spells out the purpose of the page. Place it at the top as the start of your page roadmap.

4. Use visual cues: People “read” pictures faster than words. So be sure to include your logo, a picture of your product, your call to action (CTA) button, color blocks and containers.

Critical Mention Landing Page5. Remove the clutter: Ask yourself “Does it really need to be there?” Is it helping the customer or simply confusing them? Is it visual clutter? It’s either a yes or a no. “Maybe” is always a no.

6. Use contrasting colors: Color can be a powerful tool. It can help you roadmap your page and make it clear where users need to pay attention. This is most important when it comes to your information collection and your CTA.

7. Remove navigation: Don’t give them an out, or a chance to navigate elsewhere. You want them to focus on your landing page.

8. Add sharing: Add your social media links and/or a share button. This can definitely increase your traffic and results. Be obvious, but subtle. You don’t want these icons to overpower your call to action.

9. Use credibility and trust symbols: If you have TV or media endorsements, use their logos on your page — but remember to keep them small and subdued. They are valuable as credibility and support, but are not the point of your landing page. Same with a testimonial from a credible client. Use them sparingly and as a support element.

Smart Sheet Landing Page10. Use normal conventions: Do not reinvent the wheel. Visitors understand normal conventions and look for them. It will help them move quickly through your forms and get to your CTA.

11. Remember mobile is taking over: Your landing page must be easy to view and complete on a smart phone and tablet.

12. Test. Test. Test. These are just guidelines. You need to continuously A/B test the elements of your design for maximum results. As they say, your mileage my vary.

Remember the key to effective landing pages is simplicity and clarity. The design of your landing pages must lead the visitor through the page, culminating on them hitting the CTA button.

Benchmarking: There’s No Such Thing as an Average 2% Response Rate

It seems easy enough to answer the question: How to know if a marketing campaign measures up? But managing client expectations (whether they’re internal or external) is sometimes more fuzzy

It seems easy enough to answer the question: How to know if a marketing campaign measures up?

Often enough, there are predefined business objectives, acceptable margins for profit and cost, and a marketing return on investment that is straightforward enough to calculate. If one is able to know any and all of these markers, then one can know if a marketing campaign, or even a single tactic, is making the grade.

But managing client expectations (whether they’re internal or external) is sometimes more fuzzy. And a marketing execution doesn’t always go according to plan, prompting investigations on what might have gone wrong. (I’m still surprised how testing is underutilized, for example.)

On the happier end of the spectrum, stellar results might prompt a whole other set of questions: “Did we really beat the long-standing control? This campaign performed gang-busters, how does it measure up to efforts of our industry peers? Is this campaign award-worthy?”

As a public relations professional in the world of direct response, I’ve often been asked to help an agency or marketing client understand how good or bad a particular marketing result might be. When the question is about results that are less than expected, there is often internal wrangling about the creative, the list and/or the strategy — any of which might be the culprit. When the results are fantastic, clients often want to know, are we beating whatever the competition may be up to.

In both scenarios, among go-to options are various industry research sources. Anyone who has a subscription to Who’s Mailing What! archive (direct mail, email), or taps eMarketer or Econsultancy (digital and mobile information), or steps up to Gartner, Forrester and the like for subscriptions to qualitative reporting, certainly has access to great data and idea stores.

I personally keep a copy of “DMA Statistical Fact Book” (annually published) and “DMA Response Rate Report” close at hand. The “DMA Response Rate Report’s” 2015 version is recently published, and is available at the DMA Bookstore. Both are understandably Direct Marketing Association top-sellers.

The “DMA Response Rate Report” aggregates data from respondents — providing a true benchmarking resource. And it breaks response data out by media, and by industry (selling cars is not selling clothes) which gives marketers a helpful guide of what to shoot for and expect. It’s worth a whole other post to delve into its insights, but IWCO Direct and SeQuel Response recently offered some. A quick inspection of the report can let marketers know what they might expect from an otherwise well-executed campaign.

And I’m happy to say to some clients, too, as another benchmark, that they should enter the International ECHO Awards. It’s perhaps the best way to be recognized for achievement (beyond the paycheck). With judges inspecting the world’s best in data-driven advertising, an ECHO trophy says that a marketing team, agency or organization knows its stuff. This year’s competition deadline for entering is July 10, and DMA is offering a Webinar on May 19 to give tips and insights from the judges themselves (speaking will be yours truly, joined by fellow Target Marketing blogger Carolyn Goodman of Goodman Marketing Partners and Smithsonian’s Karen Rice Gardiner). Have only five minutes to spare? You can always hear directly from Carolyn here about the entry process.

Enter early and often! I’d love to point to your campaign as a “benchmark” later this year.

Email to Support Your Shopping Cart

Your website provides you with real estate for validating claims and educating customers, and should be a critical part of every marketing campaign. Yet so many marketers toss up a landing page and call it a day. With e-commerce supplanting more and more brick and mortar stores, it may be time for you to re-evaluate your drip and nurture approach

Your website provides you with real estate for validating claims and educating customers, and should be a critical part of every marketing campaign. Yet so many marketers toss up a landing page and call it a day. With e-commerce supplanting more and more brick and mortar stores, it may be time for you to re-evaluate your drip and nurture approach.

E-commerce has become easier, more affordable and created opportunities for more businesses and more kinds of businesses. Applications such as Cart66, Magento, OpenCart and WooCommerce enable businesses of all sizes to provide an online shopping experience for their customers like never before. Unfortunately, it is not, “Build it and they will come”. Like much of the rest of our business, it’s Build it, market it like crazy, hope they will come, and beg them to come back.” That’s where drip and nurture marketing take the stage.

Drip campaigns are predesigned campaigns sent on predetermined schedulea to a general audience—your newsletter is a great example. Nurture campaigns are often called auto-responder campaigns, and they are sent in response to an action or interaction with your campaign or site. Think of your “Thank you for subscribing” confirmation email: The subscriber filled out a form, and, due to that action, you automatically acknowledge her action and thank her. Perhaps in two weeks, you will send her another email, but you might also automatically enroll her in your newsletter campaign.

Many of today’s shopping carts have auto-responder capabilities built in. When an order is placed, a confirmation is sent. When a shopping cart is abandoned, a reminder is sent. When an order is shipped, a notification is sent. All of these are nurturing messages and all good ideas, but let’s take your campaign a step further.

In November, I will be presenting at the WooConf event in San Francisco. This event is primarily for developers of the WooCommerce shopping cart for WordPress, but also draws a fair number of marketers. In my talk, I will focus on what I see as the top three concerns for an online store: “Buy Now, Buy More, and Buy Again.” That is: sell a product, upsell and cross-sell other products, and build a relationship resulting in return customers. I achieve these goals with drip and nurture campaigns.

Your first email is designed to introduce your store—invite visitors and entice them to make the initial purchase. This is neither a drip or nurture campaign, but more probably a single blast email. For the purpose of my example, depending upon how the blast is received, you will net those who are engaged and those who are not—more specifically identified as the passive (clicked but did not buy) and the active (clicked and purchased). These two groups now represent the members of the drip and nurture campaigns.

For the passively interested, start them out with a drip campaign designed specifically to find the trigger that turns their passive interest into active participation (buying). A newsletter is probably a bit too slow for this group, so think more about a weekly specials email. Offering various products and discounts through A/B and multi-variant testing, you should be able to identify key influencers. Drip campaigns should be designed with a single theme enabling you to keep development costs down and in a manner enabling you to make on-the-fly updates and announce specials. Our drip members are the Buy Now group. We want to figure out what it takes to get them to buy now.

For the more actively interested, let’s nurture their behavior. They have clicked and are in the process of making a purchase, so how can we encourage them to either increase the value of the purchase or add other products to increase the value of their cart? This is the Buy More group.

If they have started a cart, but not checked out, reminder emails keep the conversation active and presents the ideal time to introduce other products complementary to those items in their cart. You can use the tried and true, “other people who bought this item also bought,” or offer links to reviews and case studies. This is where your website real estate becomes so valuable—and why we will not launch an automated campaign that does not have adequate website support. Point these recipients to stories, videos or other documents helpful to the education and conversion processes.

For those who have checked out—great! you won a new customer—but don’t let too much time pass before you reengage them and remind them of other must-have items in your store. Learn from what they purchased and offer other items in the same category or similar category. This is our Buy Again group and personalization is key here (as it is with the Buy More group). Emails should be very specific and speak directly the items they’ve purchased. You might also ask them to provide a review of the product, if your site supports this.

If you’re ready to start selling online, it’s a great time to do so. Software for e-commerce is inexpensive and flexible—you can customize to meet nearly any need. While your store is important, the ease of use paramount, and stability critical, don’t forget to turn an evaluating eye to your marketing and messaging. Both are likely in need of a few tweaks here and there to help achieve “Buy Now, Buy More, and Buy Again.”

Direct Marketing Turnaround: How Video Lifted Sales 20%

When a direct marketing campaign achieves a 20 percent lift in sales—with video as the central delivery vehicle—it deserves a deep dive analysis. As we reflected on what made this campaign so successful and lifted an organization from the marketing doldrums, we identified three transformational concepts that explain why this campaign was a huge hit. If your direct marketing results have seen a steady decline over the years, and you’re ready for a marketing turnaround, this

When a direct marketing campaign achieves a 20 percent lift in sales—with video as the central delivery vehicle—it deserves a deep dive analysis. As we reflected on what made this campaign so successful and lifted an organization from the marketing doldrums, we identified three transformational concepts that explain why this campaign was a huge hit. If your direct marketing results have seen a steady decline over the years, and you’re ready for a marketing turnaround, this message is for you.

The three words we use to describe this marketing transformation are:

  • Purpose
  • Frequency
  • Free

Using these concepts, you can supercharge email and social media using online video, and also strengthen direct mail, print advertising and other channels.

With video, you have purpose every time you reach out to connect with your installed base of customers or followers with email and social media. Your offer is transformed from “buy me now” to “engagement.”

Using an approach that builds a continuing story, with chapters unfolding with each new video, you can create videos that have purpose for email to customers and prospects. Video also leverages the power of social media because you create ongoing connection.

With video, you can more frequently reach out to your customers and prospects with email and social media by giving them free information.

Get the complete story where we describe purpose in Part 1 of this two-part video series.

(If the video isn’t just above this line, click here to view it.)

If You Speak, Will They Listen?

Yesterday, I was one of two speakers at a webinar hosted by Target Marketing. During our prep call earlier in the week, the host advised us that over 1,000 people had signed up to attend this free event. Now I know from past experience that only 50 percent will likely attend, but another 10 percent to 20 percent will listen to the podcast after the fact. But despite providing case studies, facts and figures based on industry best practices, the disappointing reality is that very few “attendees” will ever try to implement the lessons that I shared

Yesterday, I was one of two speakers at a webinar hosted by Target Marketing. During our prep call earlier in the week, the host advised us that over 1,000 people had signed up to attend this free event.

Now I know from past experience that only 50 percent will likely attend, but another 10 percent to 20 percent will listen to the podcast after the fact. But despite providing case studies, facts and figures based on industry best practices, the disappointing reality is that very few “attendees” will ever try to implement the lessons that I shared.

How do I know this? Because I’ve worked with hundreds of clients and have spoken at dozens of conferences and am continued to be amazed at how many companies feel the need to reinvent the wheel.

For example, when presented with a prospect’s particular marketing challenge and we recommend a fully integrated campaign solution that includes online and offline initiatives, the client says “let’s test to learn what will work best.”

Really?

I’ve been involved in testing for my entire 30+ year marketing career. And I’ve tested offers, colors, premiums, even signature lines, and those can yield very different results client to client. But here’s the one thing I don’t need to test: A fully integrated marketing campaign will outperform a single medium campaign every time. Why? Because different people consume information differently.

Some spend time online and click through banners, buttons or SEM results. Others gather information at conferences and webinars. Still others open and read email and direct mail.

Net-net, at some point, if they have a need, they will raise their hands in some way, whether they accept an inbound call from your sales rep or make a call into your call center. Perhaps they’ll visit your website and download something? Or visit your booth at a tradeshow?

The source of the “lead” will be misleading if you’re trying to measure and prove ROI, because they were exposed to your message in a number of ways and just because they finally raised their hands, you assign them to one channel and credit it with being the driver of leads. The next thing you know, you’re shifting marketing dollars to that one channel, and yet a year later you’re wondering why lead volume is down.

On the other end of the spectrum, I’ll meet new prospects who say their last (single channel) marketing campaign didn’t work. Therefore the (single channel) is a waste of money.

After digging a little deeper, the prospect didn’t really know where the “list” came from, or what the “offer” was or whether the campaign ran during a hurricane which meant that no one was online searching for their particular product during that particular week.

Here’s the key takeaway: Well planned, fully integrated campaigns usually yield the highest number of leads at the lowest cost. And the key to real sales success is the follow up.

Follow up those leads with an intelligent combination of emails and phone calls based on lead value (oh yeah, don’t forget to ask two or three questions when acquiring that lead so you can score its value to the organization), and—here’s the most important part—actually follow up with emails and phone calls that demonstrate to that prospect that you understand his or her pain and have the experience and solutions that can help solve the problem. In other words, talk to them in a language they can understand.

When prospects complete an online form and complete the box that asks “Industry” by choosing “Manufacturing,” don’t contact them as if they are in healthcare. If the forms asks for “Company Size” and the respondent chooses “1 to 10,” then treat that respondent like the small business it is. Demonstrate that you understand the challenges facing small businesses in manufacturing and you’ll gain far more credibility and brand engagement.

The next time management asks you to reinvent the wheel to solve the marketing challenge, tell them you already know what to do, because you’ve done your homework.

YouTube Analytics for Direct Marketers

For direct marketers, YouTube analytics is a treasure-trove of data about video marketing measurement and performance. By interpreting “Views Reports,” you can produce stronger direct response-oriented videos using demographics, playback locations, traffic sources and audience retention. Translate the description of the metrics into direct marketing language, and you’ll gain a new perspective of the power of online video marketing.

For direct marketers, YouTube analytics is a treasure-trove of data about video marketing measurement and performance. By interpreting “Views Reports,” you can produce stronger direct response-oriented videos using demographics, playback locations, traffic sources and audience retention. Translate the description of the metrics into direct marketing language, and you’ll gain a new perspective of the power of online video marketing.

For example, views can be thought of as impressions or leads. Look at views by day of the week like you might think of seasonality in direct mail terms. The demographics from YouTube reporting reveals gender and ages of your viewers—something you would want to understand before choosing a direct mail list.

Playback locations, including where a video is embedded (your own website or other locations), tells you where your direct marketing campaign could yield the best result. Knowing if mobile viewing is high or growing is vital. And knowing audience retention is akin to knowing if your outer envelope was opened, and how much of the letter, brochure, lift note and order form were read.

In this video, we take you on the tour of View Reports on YouTube analytics, and show you examples from our own videos so you can see these reports firsthand.


(If the video isn’t just above this line, click here to view it.)

Finally, a request: in our next series of videos we will be dissecting the “YouTube Creator Playbook” and interpreting it for direct marketers. There is a tremendous amount of information to cover. Please tell us in your comments below, or send an email to me, with your preference of video delivery. Tell us if you prefer….

1. Longer “deep dive” videos that are several minutes long and cover the material in a three-part series?

Or…

2. Shorter videos that are only a few minutes long, but cover the material in smaller parts over several weeks?

We’ve also considered producing a set of videos that would take you deeper within the “YouTube Creator Playbook” and YouTube analytics to show you how those numbers can be used by direct marketers. If you would be interested in subscribing to an educational program like this, please use the email link on this page, or comment below, to let us know your thoughts.