4 Ways Artificial Intelligence Can Impact Your Conversion Rates

At this point, there is little doubt that artificial intelligence is the future of business. The Salesforce “State of Marketing” report found that more than a fifth of businesses currently use AI for marketing purposes, including programmatic buying, personalization, and real-time offers.

At this point, there is little doubt that artificial intelligence is the future of business. The Salesforce “State of Marketing” report found that more than a fifth of businesses currently use AI for marketing purposes, including programmatic buying, personalization, and real-time offers.

artificial intelligence graphic
Credit: Salesforce

Further, AI is the fastest-growing sales technology, according to the Salesforce “State of Sales” report.

Outside of sales and marketing, companies are frequently using artificial business intelligence for tasks like reporting, dashboards, and data warehousing and analytics.

While applying AI to these business operations is certainly beneficial, it does beg the question of how exactly this technology will impact the future of conversion optimization, as well as the most important person in a business: the customer.

At the end of the day, the thing that really matters in business is the numbers. AI technology for analyst reports and predicting turns in the market is all well and good, but if it isn’t boosting sales, then what is the point?

The good news is that AI is showing promising results in terms of conversion rates, proving once again that big data is paving the way to a more profitable future for many companies. Here’s how.

1. Enriches Customer Experience

The concept of improving the customer experience (CX) is a big challenge for many reasons. CX is not merely limited to the user-friendliness of a website or the customer service that is provided; it is a combination of all of these elements. Yet another report from Salesforce found that consistency is a core element in a positive customer experience, and 70% of customers say connected processes based on earlier interactions and contextualized engagement are important for them to do business with a company.

This means that in order to improve the CX for customers, brands must adjust every part of the experience to create a coherent message.

Studies have found that customers are willing to pay more for a better experience with a business. It also has a strong effect on their likelihood to repurchase and refer the product or company to friends.

artificial intelligence graph
Credit: Temkin Group

But what exactly makes up “customer experience” and where does AI fit in?

CX is essentially the accumulation of every interaction a customer has with a business, from introduction, to purchase, to customer service. As experienced business owners know, one small kink in the journey can send people running. AI and machine learning technology can help create a more optimized experience for each customer, from start to finish.

For example, when fashion brand FlyPolar experienced a near 400% decrease in sales in the span of just four months, the business executives knew that something wasn’t right. Because most of its customers purchased online, FlyPolar used AI software to optimize its website landing pages. By using machine learning technology, this AI program “learned” which designs performed best and delivered positive results.

After several weeks of testing, the AI system identified the core roots of the conversion problems and provided the proper insights for solutions. FlyPolar created a simpler four-step conversion funnel on its website, with optimized CTA button placement throughout the landing pages. By using machine learning algorithms, FlyPolar increased its checkout page traffic by 16% and its order value by 13% in just three weeks.

This case study shows that AI technology can quickly and easily identify the root of the problem, arguably one of the most difficult parts of optimizing the CX.

The prediction capabilities of AI-powered systems can also make it easier for your customers to find exactly what they are looking for; which, in turn, improves their experience with your website. Traditional searches base results on matching keywords or similar phrases, which may or may not be accurate. In contrast, present-day search programs use ML to “learn” consumer behavior and accurately return the items that match their queries, based on their previous behavior.

ML-based search takes numerous data points into consideration, including past view and click rates, ratings, and even inventory levels to provide customers with appropriate and targeted results.

It should be no surprise here that Amazon is one of the leading retailers to utilize this kind of technology. Amazon’s recommendation engine uses item-to-item collaborative filtering to provide search results that are based on multiple data points, rather than just keyword matches. Not only does the algorithm take each customer’s past searches, purchases, and product views into consideration, but also the ratings and popularity of each item.

artificial intelligence example
Credit: Amazon

Since Amazon debuted an AI-based recommendation engine, its profits started growing exponentially. By basing search results on multiple criteria, Amazon is able to push certain products while providing shoppers with the results that fit their needs, providing a better experience for the customer with each query.

2. Enhances Personalization

Buying online is no longer a one-size-fits-all experience. In fact, customers are becoming more and more unyielding that businesses customize just about everything to fit their needs. According to Accenture’s “Personalization Pulse Check” report, three out of four customers report that they would be more likely to purchase from a brand that offers personalization and recognition than businesses that do not.

Personalization is also directly related to higher profits. Researchers have found that businesses utilizing big data systems to create personalized experiences for their customers report up to 10% higher revenues.

AI is able to take the guesswork out of personalization. One of the best examples of this strategy in action comes from Starbucks, which reported a 300% increase in customer spending thanks to its highly-customized marketing program. Customers regularly receive personalized offers and incentives to earn more points toward a free drink reward. Every customer’s offer is based on past behavior, including how often each customer purchases and which types of items the customer tends to buy.

Starbucks’ AI-powered personalization system sends out around 400,000 variants of emails with incentives that are almost entirely unique for each recipient. Due to the hyper-personalization that Starbucks offers, many customers find it easy to fulfill the requirements for these rewards. This does wonders to increase consumer participation, purchase frequency, and ultimately, customer loyalty.

artificial intelligence in loyalty programs
Credit: Starbucks App

Of course, loads of consumer data are needed in order for online companies to provide this high level of personalization. Each customer’s preferences, demographics, and behavior must be tracked and analyzed in order for brands to properly adjust their strategies to fit an individual consumer.

The results from integrating personalized messaging and marketing speak for themselves: 63% of marketers report that an increase in conversion rates was the top benefit they saw from personalization.

AI-powered personalization can be used to help customers move their way through the buyer’s journey, as well. Using ML, these programs use predictive analysis to incentivize shoppers with personalized messages, email campaigns, retargeted ads, and more.

The algorithms can study consumer behavior so that ads and other messages are sent at the right time and trigger the ideal response. For example, an algorithm that tracks customers’ click rates and scrolling habits can predict when new customers are likely to abandon their carts and send a well-timed message or personal offer to keep them engaged.

artificial intelligence-generated offer
Credit: Acquisio.com

3. Improves Results of A/B Testing

Most marketing teams and web designers rely on A/B testing to determine the best layouts, color schemes, and messaging to grab their customers’ attention. However, there are obvious limits to the “old-fashioned” testing approach. Gathering the research takes time, and there is not always a clear winner from the results.

In fact, the traditional form of this strategy may not even be effective. Jeremy Miller, marketing director at Sentient, said during an interview:

In traditional A/B testing formats, you have your control vs. an experiment. You run that experiment against your traffic, and whichever design performs better is the one you deploy … but people have found that six out of seven experiments don’t result in a positive outcome, so you actually have to put a lot of energy and resources to try to determine how you can actually increase conversions using A/B testing.”

AI can solve the three biggest problems with traditional A/B testing: time required, insight, and limited variables. By reducing these weaknesses, marketing teams have the ability to make informed design changes with the results and data to support them. Instead of taking a linear approach to testing, AI can compare thousands of variables at the same time and instantly compare the results to determine the best combination.

For example, online lingerie company Cosabella used an AI-driven testing approach when it was redesigning its website. Rather than comparing designs two at a time, like a traditional A/B test would, Cosabella was able to carry out an A/B/n experiment with 160 different design elements, simultaneously. With that many variables, it would have taken up to a year of A/B testing to gather results; with AI, the process took only seven weeks.

artificial intelligence testing
Credit: Cosabella.com

Through this testing process, Cosabella was able to determine the aesthetics that resulted in better conversions. It found that customers bought more when CTA buttons were pink, rather than black. The company also determined that family values resonated with its customers, so it did away with “free shipping” banners and replaced them with “Family Owned Since 1983.” After these short seven weeks of testing, Cosabella reported a 38% increase in conversions and a 1,000% lift in newsletter signups.

4. Speeds Up Customer Service

The faster a company can respond to customer inquiries or issues, the better. For this reason, the demand for live chat grew by 8.29% last year. Unfortunately, most businesses do not have the resources to keep their customer service departments running 24/7, leading to long response wait times for disgruntled customers.

By automating customer service with AI-powered chatbots, businesses can not only solve the issue of wait time, but also the quality of the response and assistance that customers receive.

In 2012, Amtrak’s customer service department serviced 30 million passengers each day. Obviously, with such high numbers, it was difficult to handle individual inquiries in a timely manner, so Amtrak decided to jump on the chatbot train with its AI-powered customer service rep “Julie.”

Julie was able to resolve most of these issues by pre-filling forms through scheduling tools and guiding customers step-by-step through the online booking process. Because most of these problems were handled online, the number of calls and emails decreased dramatically. At the end of the first year, Julie had answered over 5 million questions, increased booking rates by 25%, and generated 30% more revenue, thanks to upsell options included in the messaging.

artificial intelligence chat
Credit: NextIT.com

In terms of conversions, live chatbots can not only resolve issues in an instant, they can increase the chances that a customer decides to buy. When a customer’s issue is solved quickly, they are twice as likely to repurchase from that brand. Live chat is also the preferred method of communication for resolving problems or issues; however, it is important to note that the quality of the messaging far outweighs the speed of the response.

According to Kayako’s report on live chat service, 95% of customers say that receiving a thorough response that answers their question or resolves the problem is more important than just getting a quick reply. This is a major issue that many companies have with AI chatbots; they are simply programmed to give automated, scripted responses, which 29% of customers report as simply frustrating and unhelpful.

This is where AI-based chatbots save the day; they can adjust their messaging based on FAQs, as well as the customer’s phrasing and responses. This process leads to better and more natural replies from bots that delight customers and give them the timely information they need.

An AI chatbot is not a one-time fix to the issue of customer service. It is a strategy that must be properly monitored, adjusted, and perfected over time in order to deliver the best results.

The Wrap

Many conversations these days are revolving around AI and its impact on the future of business. And, quite honestly, it seems like the answer to just about every current business planning issue out there. Predictive analytics can tell you when things are about to change. Machine learning can understand your customers on a personal, granular level, and big data can keep track of every metric for accurate reporting.

However, one of the clearest benefits of AI is the direct impact it can have on conversions. It eliminates the guesswork from improving the CX of webpages and delivers timely and accurate testing results needed to increase the likeliness of conversions. Big data systems and AI make hyper-personalization possible to customize the experience for each visitor. Finally, chatbots can use ML to instantly engage with customers, resolve issues immediately, and close sales.

Success all boils down to how a business makes the customer feel. Most of the time, this is what determines whether or not a customer will purchase. Studies have found, unsurprisingly, that when customers feel special, important, and satisfied, they are more likely to buy from those brands. AI gives brands the power to do just that.

Digital Marketing Strategy Involves Knowing When to Seek an Outside Perspective

In deciding how to tackle a marketing problem, you should consider whether insider expertise, an outside perspective, or a combination of the two will lead to the best possible outcome.

Tackling digital marketing tasks — as with just about any other business task — can lead you to solutions under your own roof or to bringing in outside help.

Primary motivators in that decision-making process are likely to be cost, of course, or expertise. Do you have someone with the necessary skills and enough bandwidth to take on the project?

There should be another consideration, as well: would an outside perspective provide value that an in-house resource can’t?

The situations below provide some possible paths with which you might approach your own marketing conundrums, even if they aren’t an exact match for these examples.

Website Architecture and Navigation

For all but the most complex of websites, structure and navigation look deceptively simple. (Most sites with overly complex navigation could probably be better organized.)

And of course, most of us spend a fair amount of time on the web, so we feel we can tell a good experience from a bad one.

But just because your team members have their opinions doesn’t mean they can translate them into a useful set of recommendations that fit your website’s needs. That’s where applicable experience becomes valuable, though that experience doesn’t necessarily require an outside perspective.

The real value an outside perspective provides is an ability to more easily view your message and content in the same way your target audience will. An outside expert is not saddled with the deeply ingrained knowledge that any well-versed marketing employee will have.

An outside perspective here can mean the difference between a site that is set up to mimic your firm’s org chart or business units, and a site that is organized to appeal to each of your most important audience segments and gather the information they’re likely to be most interested in.

Content Strategy and Content Development

But an outside perspective doesn’t always win the day. For example, when it comes to content development, we encourage our clients to devote skills and resources needed to generate content themselves, in-house. Nobody will ever know your business as well as your own team does, though a long-term “permalancer” can come very close. In that case, though, they’re not really providing an outside perspective. Quite the opposite; they are outsiders who are essentially assimilating your culture.

There are exceptions, as with problem areas that seem like they should be producing a positive marketing ROI but are not. An outside perspective can be all that’s needed to make the adjustment that get the results rolling in.

Same Old Wine in a Brand New Jar

(Bonus points if you can name the song from which that line comes. Hint: It’s by The Who, but it’s not one of their big hits.)

Finally, there are instances where the combination of an outside perspective and inside knowledge are an unbeatable combination. We see this during the discovery process we run before website design or coding get underway.

As we seek out input from a wide range of stakeholders, we get an incredible range of perspectives, from the marketing team, as you’d expect, but also from top-level executives, as well as entry-level customer-facing employees.

An outside perspective alone wouldn’t provide any great value, but when combined with great insights from the inside team, the outcomes are incredibly powerful. The outside expert may not add any new thinking; they simply help the internal team view the insights they themselves have from another angle.

These three paths — inside knowledge only, outside perspective, and the two working together — should all be considered as you address your everyday marketing tasks, as well as the thorny issues we all face from time to time. Putting the right kind of team together is an important part of crafting the best solution.

3 Sustainable Ways to Build a Customer-Focused Content Strategy

Learn how to create a branded content strategy that not only produces quality content, but also takes into account what your customers really want.

We’ve all seen umpteen studies proving (correlating) that the more content you publish on your blog, the more visits and leads you get. Marketers take this finding at face value and race to publish more (and more visible) content, with “experts” and “thought leaders” spewing advice on the latest tools and technology that will purportedly have your audience consuming your brand content with tears in their eyes.

The result is that every day, over 3 million blog posts are published, not to mention the countless social media updates posted. While there’s a lot of well-researched content in this haystack, much of it is conjecture and outright replication.

In order to stand out from the overflowing stream of new content, marketing teams often fall into the trap of chasing every tactic that comes their way or “borrowing” from the content created by famous brands or industry experts, and “adapting” (read, rehashing) it to fit their own content strategy. Instead, they should be gleaning lessons from big brands’ innovative content strategies and keep looking for ideas — from the most commonplace to the most implausible sources.

Let’s discuss a few ideas to ensure your content strategy never goes out of style, while matching the pace of your content production with your audience’s propensity to consume it.

Collate Industry Data and Visualize It

From a used car salesman to an apparel website, everyone has to resort to statistics and facts once a while. This was earlier done with presentations, charts, and tables. However, we’ve long needed respite from these boring and confusing ways to present numerical data.

Thanks to Edward Tufte and his four classic books on data visualization, data and visualization came together like two long-lost brothers uniting after a long time. Tufte had faced many problems in his career, because of poor data representation tools. So he revamped data presentation by adding images to data. The New York Times called him the “Leonardo da Vinci of data” while Business Insider referred to him as the “Galileo of graphics.”

Interestingly, research by Nielsen concluded that readers will pay closer attention to relevant pictures included on the page, as our eyes are naturally drawn to images. However, they will ignore visuals included just for the sake of imagery.

But it wasn’t until the availability of infographic-making tools that this method became mainstream. Today, visualization is the basis of content marketing, and not going away any time soon. Whether it is social media posts or blog articles, the simplest way to catch your customer’s eye is with pictures and videos, which get far more engagement than text-heavy content. This holds true across all digital and traditional platforms and channels.

A survey by Venngage built upon this, with empirical evidence that engagement depends on the type of visuals used in the content. Infographics and original illustrations perform the best, followed by charts and video. “Trendy” formats, stock photos, and memes actually receive the lowest amount of engagement.

content strategy graphic
Credit: Venngage.com

The lesson here is that numbers are boring, but you can’t avoid them forever. Content marketers must take a cue from Edward Tufte’s data visualization strategy and revamp their content to include lots of graphics — even better if they are animated or interactive.

Share Success Stories

The best lessons are learned from other people’s experiences. Strangely, many marketers ignore this fact, even though every customer knows it.

Very few companies package their successes into case studies that they can easily use to appeal to a wider audience and acquire more customers.

Don’t make this mistake. Always be on the lookout for case studies — they don’t necessarily need to be yours, if you don’t have enough or relevant experience. Analyze industry examples thoroughly to gauge your potential customers’ intent, challenges in targeting them or doing business, and how these challenges can be overcome. Don’t frown upon any content format — be they detailed whitepapers, listicles, or good old FAQs. Make sure your content marketing plan provides solutions to all of your customers’ woes with actionable advice.

E-commerce platform BigCommerce has dedicated a whole section of its website to showcasing retailers’ (in both the enterprise and SMB sectors) success stories, as well as case studies. The best of the best get their own feature pages, but the showcasing doesn’t end there. (Hey, this is the best in digital merchandising we’re talking about!) BigCommerce even hands out its own annual awards to the merchants who provide a great user experience and innovative eecommerce solutions to their customers.

content strategy screen shot
Credit: BigCommerce.com

These case studies are sorted by industry or topic, and include advice on entrepreneurship, retailing, advertising, media, and pretty much anything related to doing business online. This content has no obvious CTA or tangible conversion value that you might expect. But, despite that, it is worth its weight in gold, due to the brand credibility it portrays and information it delivers to the audience.

Just as in B2C, 65% of B2B marketers believe in the effectiveness of case studies as a content marketing tactic (after in-person events and webinars). People trust real examples more than branded content. Most people (and by extension, organizations) will look at what others are doing and how they are doing it before they make a final decision. Use this psychological tendency as a base on which to build heaps of helpful content.

Combine your case studies with visual testimonials to drive home the value of your product. Video is a great way to deliver a memorable message about the joy your product brings to the lives of real users, while demonstrating to others how it can help them make pressing problems go away. Video conferencing tool Zoom used this strategy to feature one of its largest clients, Zendesk:

Instead of using a quote from the top management, like most testimonials do, this clip features sound bites from people across the organization. It shows the product in actual use by people in different roles and how every one of them is happy to do so.

Focus on Educational Content

CMI’s “Content Marketing Benchmarks” report for 2019 revealed that 77% of the most successful B2B content marketers nurture their audiences with educational content. An overwhelming 96% believe that that building trust and credibility is what qualifies them as thought leaders in their industry. Therefore, delivering useful information to your audience, leads, and customers is easily one of the most effective ways to succeed with content.

Google Analytics is so ubiquitous with website analytics that you’d think it didn’t have to care about acquiring or retaining customers. After all, we all live and swear by GA, right? But Google does not take its position as the market leader in web analytics for granted. With a dedicated Google Analytics Academy that offers how-to guides, training courses, and even certifications to existing Google Analytics users, Google holds its users in an iron grip.

content strategy from Google
Credit: Google.com

The biggest advantage of customer education is retention (which again drives sales at the lowest costs). Another market leader that takes customer education (and retention) seriously is IKEA. From alternate uses for its products to showcasing how customers have creatively used IKEA products to take their lifestyles to the next level, IKEA’s Inspiration section is a design buff’s delight.

content strategy from IKEA
Credit: Ikea.com

Over to You

Drawing and keeping your customers’ attention in this fast-paced marketing age is difficult. Whether it’s your product or marketing that is great, there is someone out there who is doing it better than you and vying for your share of the market. You must constantly attempt to stand out and remain relevant, by relentlessly improving the usability, quality, and effectiveness of your content.

Riding current trends could get your content some short-lived buzz, but it is important to stay focused on pursuing long-term relationships with your customers by creating and publishing content that speaks directly to them.

How Brands Can Align Content Marketing With Sales

If your sales team doesn’t like the leads your marketing team is sending them, you should be inviting those marketing folks to sit in on sales calls to help them create the right content marketing programs.

If your sales team doesn’t like the leads your marketing team is sending them, you should be inviting those marketing folks to sit in on sales calls to help them create the right content marketing programs.

It’s not news that sales teams and marketers think differently and, uh, occasionally disagree. Your chances of completely eliminating those clashes are pretty slim, but that doesn’t mean you can’t get the two teams to work together more effectively. One way to do this is to encourage your sales team to invite their marketing counterparts out on sales calls with them. Here’s what they might learn.

What Do Prospects Really Care About?

One of the key data points for marketers is the critical questions that prospects ask about the sales team about your solution and how it relates to their problem. Marketers who are developing content marketing programs need to be absolutely certain that their material makes clear how you answer those critical questions. Hearing those questions straight from the horses mouth, so to speak, is likely to provide insights that hearing the same information filtered through the sales team’s own lens won’t.

Pain Points

Pain points are the next step as you drill down from the big picture critical questions to the nitty-gritty issues that your prospects feel every day. Your sales team can undoubtedly recite the top 10 pain points in their sleep. But, as above, familiarity may create missed opportunities. Marketers, hearing the information directly rather than through the sales team (and coming at the situation with content in mind, rather than closing), can find inspiration for new ways to connect the dots between prospects’ concerns and the solutions you offer.

Positioning

Marketing may also gain insights into how the sales team is positioning the firm’s products and services. Again, this is critical to the content they develop, as well as calls to action lead magnets. Any disconnect between what the prospect has learned from the marketing materials they’ve consumed and the message they get from the sales team can doom chances of conversion.

It’s also important for marketers to hear prospects at different points in their buying journey. Those who are ready to make a final decision will have much different concerns than prospects who are in touch with the sales team for the first time.

Ultimately these  “ride-alongs” are one more way that sales and marketing teams can communicate better, provide one another with the information to make everyone’s job easier, and get better results.

New Developments in B-to-B List Acquisition

To reach cold prospects among business audiences, sales and marketing teams often begin by developing a list of prospective targets. Marketers can find just about every target company, title and job function they need from traditional list suppliers. Plus, the Internet has made possible the introduction of some excellent new opportunities for identifying prospects at various stages of the buying cycle. Let’s look at what’s new in B-to-B lists these days

To reach cold prospects among business audiences, sales and marketing teams often begin by developing a list of prospective targets. Marketers can find just about every target company, title and job function they need from traditional list suppliers. Plus, the Internet has made possible the introduction of some excellent new opportunities for identifying prospects at various stages of the buying cycle. Let’s look at what’s new in B-to-B lists these days.

Traditionally, the first step in list development has been working with a list broker who has experience in your target audience category. There are more than 40,000 business lists available for rent in the U.S., plus numerous databases and online data enhancement services to choose from.

Business lists can be divided into four general types:

  1. Compiled files assembled from directories, the Internet or other public and private sources, by such suppliers as D&B, InfoGroup, Data.com, NetProspex and ZoomInfo. In recent years, many compilers have been making their data available for rent via an online interface, vastly enhancing the speed and flexibility of ordering.
  2. Response files created as a by-product of other businesses, like catalog/e-commerce sales, seminars, trade organization memberships, or magazine and newsletter subscriptions. Response files tend to be more current and accurate than compiled files.
  3. Cooperative databases from multiple list owners, offered in either open format, where you pay for what you use (examples being MeritDirect’s MeritBase, InfoGroup’s b2bdatawarehouse and Mardev DM2’s Decisionmaker database), or closed format, where only members who put customer names in can take prospect names out (examples include Epsilon Abacus Cooperative and the b2bBase, a joint venture of MeritDirect and Experian).
  4. Internal databases populated from billing systems, lead management systems, and website registration systems. Many companies today use their marketing automation or CRM systems as their marketing databases, and populate them from a variety of internal and external sources.

A New Direction in B-to-B Lists
The B-to-B list industry has changed considerably in the last decade, with the proliferation of social networks. But the big new development today is the trend away from static name/address lists, to dynamic sourcing of prospect names complete with valuable indicators of buying readiness culled from their actual behavior online. Companies such as InsideView and Leadspace are developing solutions in this area.

Leadspace, created by a team of former Israeli intelligence officers, is a leader in targeted, real-time prospecting data for business marketers. Their process begins with constructing an ideal buyer persona by analyzing the client’s best customers, which can be executed by uploading a few hundred records of name, company name and email address. Then, Leadspace scours the Internet, social networks and scores of contact databases for look-alikes and immediately delivers prospect names, fresh contact information and additional data about their professional activities.

How LevelEleven Took its Prospecting to the Next Level
LevelEleven provides a cloud-based platform where sales managers can create fresh and compelling sales contests within Salesforce.com. For example, the Detroit Pistons recently used LevelEleven to organize a sales contest for skyboxes at their arena, and drove sales of over half a million dollars. In other words, 50 percent of the skybox annual sales target was closed in a mere six weeks.

LevelEleven’s target prospect is a sales manager or sales operations manager in any company that uses Salesforce.com as its CRM system. Today, LevelEleven’s sales team gets leads from four sources:

  1. The Salesforce.com AppExchange, where other Salesforce users search for partners.
  2. Conferences and trade shows, like Dreamforce.
  3. Registrations from content downloads at the LevelEleven website.
  4. Rented lists of prospects.

LevelEleven has tried a variety of list sources over the years, with mixed results. In the first half of 2012, the prospecting sources produced zero in closed sales. In June 2012, they began experimenting with Leadspace. In the second half of 2012, a full 30 percent of LevelEleven closed deals came from this source.

According to Bob Marsh, CEO, the power of Leadspace for LevelEleven is its close targeting based on the LevelEleven customer profile. “Leadspace helps us infer pretty accurately whether a prospect is using the Salesforce platform,” he says. “And they deliver to us a short list of highly likely contacts in the account, like the Salesforce administrator or the sales operations manager. Everyone on our sales team has a Leadspace license, and it is performing for us.”

It’s a good thing that the B-to-B list business is continuing to evolve in new directions. What new developments are you seeing?

A version of this post appeared in Biznology, the digital marketing blog.