How to Tell If Your Marketing Works

My live Target Marketing Group Webinar yesterday, “How to Tell if Your Marketing Works,” deals with my favorite topic: measuring the results of direct marketing beyond traditional response rate metrics. Direct Marketers are their own worst enemy when it comes to measurement. They often don’t know what’s working and what’s not, because their real ROI is hidden inside their data.

My live Target Marketing Group Webinar yesterday, “How to Tell if Your Marketing Works,” deals with my favorite topic: measuring the results of direct marketing beyond traditional response rate metrics. If you missed it, you can access it on-demand here.

Direct Marketers are their own worst enemy when it comes to measurement. They often don’t know what’s working and what’s not, because their real ROI is hidden inside their data.

Analyzing direct marketing campaigns was a lot easier before the advent of the multichannel consumer. Sure, there were a certain number of orders that we couldn’t attribute to a specific promotion, but for the most part response rates ruled. Now, people check out products in stores and then buy online to get a better deal (think flat screen TVs). Or they shop online, decide what they want based on features and product reviews, and then buy in-person (think cars).

And they do all of this on multiple devices: their home computers, their work computers and their mobile phones and tablets. So it’s hard to track them.

Even though consumers engage with brands on their own terms across multiple platforms, many marketers are stuck measuring the results of individual tactics rather than taking a holistic view of measurement. So when a single email or display ad fails to achieve the target level of attributable sales within a specific period of time, then they consider it a failure. Even though the communication has made an impact on those who didn’t respond, they can’t measure it, so they don’t count it. And while many direct marketing practitioners now embrace the idea that their advertising has a cumulative effect of building a brand over time, most fall short of being able to quantify that ROI with meaningful metrics.

This webinar examines four ways to uncover hidden ROI from your direct marketing promotions:

  1. Using your database to look beyond response rates
  2. Benchmarking your brand awareness and tying increases in awareness to sales
  3. Creating an engagement score to measure the cumulative effect of various promotions over time
  4. Measuring the value of your social media

If you’re interested, check it out here.

Creepy Marketing—When Database Marketing Goes Awry

With Halloween over and the holidays on their way, I thought that Creepy Marketing made a timely subject for today’s blog. Now I’m not referring to marketing for ghouls, witches or mummies. I’m talking about adding a creepy factor to your marketing program—a major pitfall of 1:1 marketing.

With Halloween over and the holidays here, I thought that Creepy Marketing made a timely subject for today’s blog. Now I’m not referring to marketing for ghouls, witches or mummies. I’m talking about adding a creepy factor to your marketing program—a major pitfall of 1:1 marketing.

Creeping people out is, after all, contrary to what we’re trying to achieve as marketers, which is namely to use promotion to advance the brand’s sales and branding objectives. That is, of course, unless it’s your goal to damage your brand and drive away customers. Assuming that’s not the case, let’s assume that creepy is bad. Very bad. In the age of social media, one creeped out customer can very easily spread the word to hundreds of thousands of customers and prospects. In other words, better safe than sorry.

But before we go any further, however, let’s attempt to define creepy. This is important because many marketers I speak with cite there often is a razor thin line between casual and its inappropriate Cousin Creepy, between making a sale and detonating a potential long-term relationship. Fair enough. Creepiness is also a bit slippery because, like fashion tastes, standards for creepiness definitely do tend to change with time. To quote Sean parker, former CEO of Facebook, “Today’s creepy is tomorrow’s necessity.”

When it comes to detecting creepiness, I’m a firm believer of what I’ll call the ad oculos school of thought. For those of you who do not understand Latin, ad oculos means “to the eyes,” and roughly translates into “obvious to anyone that sees it.” In other words, if it looks creepy and feels creepy, then it probably is creepy and you shouldn’t do it.

You shouldn’t, for example, write out your customer’s names on a postcard or landing page—or anywhere that might be, or seem, visible to the general public. Nor for that matter should you display your customer’s age, marital status, or medical condition on any piece of marketing collateral. This doesn’t mean that you shouldn’t send offers for dating services to a customer you know is single, or information on chiropractors to someone who has acknowledged a back problem. What this means is you need to be careful with the language you use in these offers, taking care not to publicize information your customers want to remain in the private sphere.

It’s also important to keep in mind that 1:1 marketing works because it focuses like a laser on your customer’s interests and presents them with compelling and compatible product information and offers. Personalized communication is not an exercise in regurgitating your customer’s personal data in an effort to prove to them how much you know.

Remember, successful database marketers use profile data to run highly compelling and relevant campaigns to their customers. What makes the campaign successful is the fact that the offer and marketing message contain relevant information that the recipient will have a strong affinity for—not simply because it is personalized. Personalization for the sake a personalization is nothing but a gimmick—it might work once but that’s it. Successful and sustainable personalized marketing programs ultimately find a formula for identifying customer interests based on key data points and indicators, and use this formula to create and disseminate offers that will strike a chord with prospects and customers.

Have you ever been creeped out? If so, I’d love to find out how and get your feedback.