Mobile Turning the Corner

In the past few years, mobile marketing and advertising have been largely an afterthought for many brands. But this year, the hype is finally coming to fruition with the growing intersection of mobile and the retail experience. This requires brands and retailers to take a very thoughtful approach with their mobile strategy.

In the past few years, mobile marketing and advertising have been largely an afterthought for many brands. But this year, the hype is finally coming to fruition with the growing intersection of mobile and the retail experience. This requires brands and retailers to take a very thoughtful approach with their mobile strategy.

1. Strategic Focus
This increased focus has accelerated even since last fall. Brands are thinking about mobile as a strategically integrated part of their marketing, rather than just a stand-alone tactic. Many are no longer questioning the value of mobile, but rather questioning how to get the most value from it.

2. Consumer Value
Many brands are looking to achieve that value by focusing on meaningful user engagement with brand identity and utility. They have matured from simple marketing (static banner ads, coupons and QR codes that merely offer to help a shopper “learn more”). Once again, content is king.

For example, ConAgra engages consumers on contextually relevant sites and apps with recipes. Rather than just announcing that their products are available, they help shoppers save time and energy. Who doesn’t want someone telling you what’s for dinner and how to easily prepare it?

Mattel is another company that’s using its brand identity to engage with consumers in highly relevant activity. When you think Mattel, you think toys and games. So, the company is gamifying its digital efforts, giving people something to do in their downtime that’s fun and interactive. There’s a significant correlation between entertaining engagement and shopper conversions.

3. App vs. Mobile Web
While there have been great strides in mobile marketing initiatives, there is still some confusion about the strategic delivery of the content. This primarily refers to the confluence of the terms “mobile app” and “mobile Web.”

While mobile apps and websites in theory serve the same purpose, in reality they are very different beasts to create and maintain, and consumers approach each differently.

One recent example was a mobile app for a single recipe ingredient. Really? How many people are going to take the time to seek out this app, download it and see enough utility to open and use it on a regular basis?

For many brands, a better way would be to create a responsive, mobile-optimized website. This way, the content is universally and easily available on all operating systems and device sizes. It can be accessed quickly by a shopper who responds to a mobile ad or texts in a keyword with no need to download and install an app. For marketers, mobile sites are considerably less expensive to build and maintain, and faster to update.

Mobile, as a marketing channel, can no longer be ignored and must be addressed in order to succeed. There are definitely others that will help advance a brands mobile strategy such as better targeting, more relevant engagement with consumers and shoppers at the various touch points on the path to conversion and stronger collaboration with brands and retailers.