‘Who Moved My’ Multichannel Measurement on a Budget?

There are several great enterprise data platforms that can put you on your way to algorithmic attribution, but many marketers don’t have the budgets to support that investment. So how do you determine which channels are performing best for you without relying on simple but unsatisfactory attribution methods like first exposure, last click or arbitrary weighting?

Who moved my multichannel attribution?[Editor’s note: Chuck McLeester is speaking during a Target Marketing webinar on Oct. 20 titled “Who Moved the Sales? Why marketing attribution is so crucial to track, yet so hard to do.” As a preview, he’s re-running his April blog post, “3 Steps to Multichannel Measurement on a Budget.”]

There are several great enterprise data platforms that can put you on your way to algorithmic attribution, but many marketers don’t have the budgets to support that investment. So how do you determine which channels are performing best for you without relying on simple but unsatisfactory attribution methods like first exposure, last click or arbitrary weighting?

Here’s a relatively easy way to measure the incremental value of each marketing channel to determine which channels are performing best so you can optimize your marketing mix.

First, pick a set of geographically similar markets — one for each channel that you’re using plus one to act as a control cell. Make them as closely matched as you can in terms of size and demography — so don’t mix big markets like Chicago with smaller markets like Waco. You also want to stay away from markets that have competing media — for example, Princeton, N.J., is exposed to both New York and Philadelphia media. Data from the Statistical Abstract of the United States and Census.gov can help you select markets that work for you.

Second, create a test matrix where one of your markets serves as a control, and the balance of your markets eliminate one of the channels you’re evaluating. For example, in the matrix below all channels are used in the control cell, and one channel is eliminated from each of the test cells.

Chuck McLeester chartConduct your test long enough to get a statistically reliable number of responses. With 250 to 300 in each column and each row, you can be 90 percent confident that your results won’t vary by more than 10 percent in a rollout scenario.

Third, examine your cost per response by market in a matrix like the one below. (These numbers are for illustration only and are not meant to reflect actual costs or responses from these channels.)

Cells that have a higher cost per response from the control indicate that the channel you eliminated from that geo area is valuable to you because it was lowering the average cost per response in that cell. In the example below, the geo areas where email, search and social were eliminated had a higher cost per response overall, indicating that these channels were important parts of your media mix. Cells with a lower cost per response from the control indicate that the channels eliminated from those geo areas were increasing your overall cost per response. In the example below, direct mail, display and mobile all had higher costs per response than the control cell which included all the channels.

Chuck McLeester measurement chartYou can do the same analysis on revenue and profit if you are engaged in catalog or e-commerce. The difference in profit between the control profit and the profit in each equally matched geo cell provides the incremental value, whether positive or negative, of the channel that was omitted in that cell.

Chuck McLeester money chartThis experiment has its limitations. Your markets will not be perfectly matched and external factors can affect your results. However, it will provide valuable insight about the interplay among the different elements of your media mix.

Finally, remember that eliminating different channels from your media mix will also have an effect on your response or sales volume. To understand how to best manage volume within your allowable cost per response or cost per order, check out this former Here’s What Counts post.

Why Brand Matters in Organic SEO

Many years ago when I was a pre-digital marketer, when we couldn’t or didn’t measure (shame on us!) the direct results of every marketing initiative, we readily used “brand exposure” as a catch-all for marketing goodness.

Content thiefMany years ago when I was a pre-digital marketer, when we couldn’t or didn’t measure (shame on us!) the direct results of every marketing initiative, we readily used “brand exposure” as a catch-all for marketing goodness.

For example, a tradeshow appearance that netted disappointing sales was deemed to have offered “good brand exposure.” As I worked my way up as a marketer, it became increasingly apparent that “good brand exposure” was the refuge of programs of dubious value and tactics that just didn’t quite work out as planned. The result was that I became a confessed doubter of the value of most branding programs.

Then, as we roared into the digital age, where the measurement and metrics for digital marketing initiatives have bloomed, I have heard fewer initiatives whitewashed as “good brand exposure.” Over time, I have rethought my personal skepticism on what is good brand exposure and consequently the value of branding.

Success in Mobile and Organic Search Requires Strong Branding

All marketers want the searcher to look for their name, their brand and their site. This is obvious, but what is not so obvious is how branding efforts now play through in organic search.

Google typically shows a company’s name as the first organic search result. The value of name recognition is evident. Searchers looking for you by name will be delivered to you.

With the shrunken screens on mobile devices and their impact on how the search results page displays, brand name recognition is ever more important. Imprinting your name, correctly spelled, is today of utmost importance. This becomes very important when there are multiple companies with similar names, all vying for that top spot in the search results.

For pure-play e-commerce vendors, whose domain is a surrogate for their brand name, domain name recognition equals brand recognition. The No. 1 spot for their domain name in the search results is essential to their success.

Seems easy, doesn’t it? Not so fast.

There is a wrinkle. Without the support of additional branding efforts, it is easy for name-confusion to replace name-recognition. Scrapers and counterfeiters operating overseas often exploit name similarity by buying domain names similar to a leading online-only merchant. Unless there is strong brand protection and support to create the overall brand personality for the business, then the searcher can be easily misled and duped into buying from a look-alike, name-almost-alike merchant.

Brand protection should be a key part of the online e-commerce search strategy. This protection may require that you purchase domain names that are not just the usual misspellings but also those that might be exploited by a scraper.

The second level of protection requires going after counterfeiters and scrapers who steal your traffic and your business.

Part of your branding efforts should focus on making sure that your potential customers will enter your name correctly in the search box. This cries for consistency across all online media platforms.

All too frequently, I have seen companies that give their social media accounts cutesy names. These efforts, while creative, do not assist in building name recognition so that your name will be accurately placed in a search box.

While you are at it, check to see what is delivered in that first search result and see if it actually reflects what a searcher might come looking for. Then, you will truly be getting “good brand exposure.”

3 Steps to Multichannel Measurement on a Budget

There are several great enterprise data platforms that can put you on your way to algorithmic attribution, but many marketers don’t have the budgets to support that investment. So how do you determine which channels are performing best for you without relying on simple but unsatisfactory attribution methods like first exposure, last click or arbitrary weighting?

There are several great enterprise data platforms that can put you on your way to algorithmic attribution, but many marketers don’t have the budgets to support that investment. So how do you determine which channels are performing best for you without relying on simple but unsatisfactory attribution methods like first exposure, last click or arbitrary weighting?

Here’s a relatively easy way to measure the incremental value of each marketing channel to determine which channels are performing best so you can optimize your marketing mix.

First, pick a set of geographically similar markets — one for each channel that you’re using plus one to act as a control cell. Make them as closely matched as you can in terms of size and demography — so don’t mix big markets like Chicago with smaller markets like Waco. You also want to stay away from markets that have competing media — for example, Princeton, N.J., is exposed to both New York and Philadelphia media. Data from the Statistical Abstract of the United States and Census.gov can help you select markets that work for you.

Second, create a test matrix where one of your markets serves as a control, and the balance of your markets eliminate one of the channels you’re evaluating. For example, in the matrix below all channels are used in the control cell, and one channel is eliminated from each of the test cells.

Chuck McLeester chartConduct your test long enough to get a statistically reliable number of responses. With 250 to 300 in each column and each row, you can be 90 percent confident that your results won’t vary by more than 10 percent in a rollout scenario.

Third, examine your cost per response by market in a matrix like the one below. (These numbers are for illustration only and are not meant to reflect actual costs or responses from these channels.)

Cells that have a higher cost per response from the control indicate that the channel you eliminated from that geo area is valuable to you because it was lowering the average cost per response in that cell. In the example below, the geo areas where email, search and social were eliminated had a higher cost per response overall, indicating that these channels were important parts of your media mix. Cells with a lower cost per response from the control indicate that the channels eliminated from those geo areas were increasing your overall cost per response. In the example below, direct mail, display and mobile all had higher costs per response than the control cell which included all the channels.

Chuck McLeester measurement chartYou can do the same analysis on revenue and profit if you are engaged in catalog or e-commerce. The difference in profit between the control profit and the profit in each equally matched geo cell provides the incremental value, whether positive or negative, of the channel that was omitted in that cell.

Chuck McLeester money chartThis experiment has its limitations. Your markets will not be perfectly matched and external factors can affect your results. However, it will provide valuable insight about the interplay among the different elements of your media mix.

Finally, remember that eliminating different channels from your media mix will also have an effect on your response or sales volume. To understand how to best manage volume within your allowable cost per response or cost per order, check out this former Here’s What Counts post.

How to Tell If Your Marketing Works

My live Target Marketing Group Webinar yesterday, “How to Tell if Your Marketing Works,” deals with my favorite topic: measuring the results of direct marketing beyond traditional response rate metrics. Direct Marketers are their own worst enemy when it comes to measurement. They often don’t know what’s working and what’s not, because their real ROI is hidden inside their data.

My live Target Marketing Group Webinar yesterday, “How to Tell if Your Marketing Works,” deals with my favorite topic: measuring the results of direct marketing beyond traditional response rate metrics. If you missed it, you can access it on-demand here.

Direct Marketers are their own worst enemy when it comes to measurement. They often don’t know what’s working and what’s not, because their real ROI is hidden inside their data.

Analyzing direct marketing campaigns was a lot easier before the advent of the multichannel consumer. Sure, there were a certain number of orders that we couldn’t attribute to a specific promotion, but for the most part response rates ruled. Now, people check out products in stores and then buy online to get a better deal (think flat screen TVs). Or they shop online, decide what they want based on features and product reviews, and then buy in-person (think cars).

And they do all of this on multiple devices: their home computers, their work computers and their mobile phones and tablets. So it’s hard to track them.

Even though consumers engage with brands on their own terms across multiple platforms, many marketers are stuck measuring the results of individual tactics rather than taking a holistic view of measurement. So when a single email or display ad fails to achieve the target level of attributable sales within a specific period of time, then they consider it a failure. Even though the communication has made an impact on those who didn’t respond, they can’t measure it, so they don’t count it. And while many direct marketing practitioners now embrace the idea that their advertising has a cumulative effect of building a brand over time, most fall short of being able to quantify that ROI with meaningful metrics.

This webinar examines four ways to uncover hidden ROI from your direct marketing promotions:

  1. Using your database to look beyond response rates
  2. Benchmarking your brand awareness and tying increases in awareness to sales
  3. Creating an engagement score to measure the cumulative effect of various promotions over time
  4. Measuring the value of your social media

If you’re interested, check it out here.

Use Market Research to Tie Brand Awareness and Purchase Intent to Sales

For years, I’ve been saying direct marketers are their own worst enemy when it comes to measurement. Direct marketers are good at measuring the things they’ve traditionally measured—response rates, cost per lead, cost per acquisition, etc.  But they’re not good at measuring the effect that their communications have on the non-responders; when, in fact, the effect of consistent branding in direct communications is what makes direct marketing powerhouses like Omaha Steaks and 1-800-flowers.com top of mind when consumers are ready to purchase (not to mention Amazon).

For years, I’ve been saying direct marketers are their own worst enemy when it comes to measurement.

Direct marketers are good at measuring the things they’ve traditionally measured—response rates, cost per lead, cost per acquisition, etc. But they’re not good at measuring the effect that their communications have on the non-responders; when, in fact, the effect of consistent branding in direct communications is what makes direct marketing powerhouses like Omaha Steaks and 1-800-flowers.com top of mind when consumers are ready to purchase (not to mention Amazon).

Even though consumers engage with brands on their own terms across multiple platforms, many marketers are stuck measuring the results of individual tactics rather than taking a holistic view of measurement. So when a single email or display ad fails to achieve the target level of attributable sales within a specific period of time, then they consider it a failure. Even though the communication has made an impact on those who didn’t respond, they can’t measure it, so they don’t count it.

And while many direct marketing practitioners now embrace the idea that their advertising has a cumulative effect of building a brand over time, most fall short of being able to quantify that ROI with meaningful metrics.

That’s where market research can help.

Consider the following word equations in light of how awareness contributes to sales for the top direct marketing companies:

Top of mind awareness + brand reputation + need = purchase intent
Top of mind awareness + brand reputation + immediate need = purchase

So it follows that if we can monitor awareness and reputation over time and index it to sales, then we can quantify the effects of those elements on sales revenue.

Start by surveying your prospects blindly—either through mail, email or search ads using relevant keywords. Offer an incentive that’s consistent with your product offering, e.g., “Save $$$ on cell phone accessories.” Ask respondents the following questions to determine the levels of unaided and aided awareness:

  • Which brands first come to mind when thinking of “category X”? (unaided awareness)
  • Which of the following brands (list) have you ever heard of? (aided awareness)

Get a better picture of the respondents’ product usage by asking:

  • Which brand(s) within category X do you “regularly” purchase?
  • Which brand is your favorite?
  • Which brand did you last purchase?
  • How often do you purchase this type of product?
    (Light, medium, heavy user?)
  • What percentage of “category X” purchases that you’ve made (within a certain timeframe) were “brand A”? (your share of customer)

For those who have used your brand, quantify purchase intent with the following question:

  • The next time you need this product, how likely are you to purchase “brand A”?

Next, index awareness levels to sales to sales revenues. Be sure account for category sales within the same time period. Your actual sales may have gone down, but the entire category may have gone down as well, and you may in fact have gotten more than your previous share of the category sales.

As you track these metrics over time, you will be able to quantify what a point of unaided awareness is worth in sales revenue. It’s one tool that will help you understand the effect that your communications have on sales beyond the responses that you can count directly.

What Customer-Centric, Customer-Obsessed Companies Must Do

In building relationships with and value for customers, my longtime observation is most organizations tend to progress through several stages of performance: customer awareness, customer sensitivity, customer focus and customer obsession. Here is the “executive summary” version of some conditions of each stage.

In building relationships with and value for customers, my longtime observation is most organizations tend to progress through several stages of performance: customer awareness, customer sensitivity, customer focus and customer obsession.

Here is the “executive summary” version of some conditions of each stage.

Customer Awareness
Customers are known, but in the aggregate. The organization believes it can select its customers and understand their needs. Measurement of performance is rudimentary, if it exists at all; and customer data are siloed. There’s a traditional, hierarchical, top-down management model, with “chimneyed” or “smokestack” communication (goes up or down, but not horizontal) with little evidence of teaming.

Customer Sensitivity
Customers are known, but still mostly in the aggregate. Customer service is somewhat more evident (though still viewed as a cost center), with a focus on complaint and problem resolution (but not proactive complaint generation; internal groups tend to point fingers and blame each other for negative customer issues). Measurement is mostly around customer attitudes and functional transactions, i.e. satisfaction, with little awareness of emotional relationship drivers. The organization has a principally traditional, hierarchical, top-down management model, with “chimneyed” or “smokestack” communication (goes up or down, but not horizontal), with some evidence of teaming (mostly in areas of complaint resolution).

Customer Focus
Customers are both known and valued, down to the individual level, and they are recognized as having different needs, both functional and emotional. The customer life cycle is front-and-center; and performance measurement is much more about emotion and value drivers than satisfaction. Service and value provision is regarded as an enterprise priority; and customer stabilization and recovery are goals when problems or complaints arise. Communication and collaboration with customers, between employees, and between employees and customers is featured. Management model and style is considerably more horizontal, with greater emphasis on teaming to improve customer value processes.

It’s notable that, at this more evolved and advanced stage of enterprise customer-centricity, complaints are thought of more in terms of a life cycle component, and recovery is more of a strategy than a resolution.

Customer Obsession
Throughout the organization, customer needs and expectations—especially those that are emotional—are well understood, and response is appropriate (and often proactive).

Everyone is involved in providing value to customers—from C-suite to front-line—and everyone understands his/her role. Customer behavior is recognized as essential to enterprise success, and optimal relationships are sought.

Performance measurement is focused, and shared, on what most monetizes customer behavior (loyalty, emotion and communication metrics—such as brand-bonding and advocacy—replace satisfaction and recommendation).

Customer service (along with pipelines and processes) is an enterprise priority, and seen as a vital, and profitable, element of value delivery.

The management model is far more horizontal, replacing traditional hierarchy; and there is an emphasis on teaming and inclusion of customers to create or enhance value.

Companies that are customer-obsessed, and what makes them both unique and successful, have been extensively profiled by consultants and the business press. Often, they go so far as to create emotionally driven, engaged and even branded experiences for their customers, strategically differentiating them from their peers.

In addition, these companies focus on the complete customer life cycle, and much more on retention, loyalty and risk mitigation (and even winback) than acquisition. Support experiences are strategic, nimble and seamless, and often omnichannel. Multiple sources of data are used to develop insights. Recognizing the information needs of their customers, they invest in altruistic content creation (over advertising); and they communicate proactively and in as personalized a manner as possible

Customer obsession, what I refer to as “inside-out” customer-centricity, has been a frequent subject of my blogs and articles: One of Albert Einstein’s iconic quotes reflects the complete dedication of resources and values needed for an organization to optimize its relationships with customers: “Only one who devotes himself to a cause with his whole strength and soul can be a true master.” Mastery requires, as well, a storehouse of experience coming from experimentation; so, just like in the pole vault and high jump, we can expect that the customer-centricity bar will continue to be raised.

Facebook Embraces Direct Response

Facebook dominates the Web, but it’s never really cracked the direct response puzzle. That looks like it will change in 2013 with an avalanche of new measurement and targeting tools. As a marketing platform, Facebook has traditionally thrived at top-of-the-funnel advertising. Unlike search, which hits people just as they express an interest in buying a certain product or service, social media marketing at its best builds relationships, and there’s compelling evidence for its value.

Facebook dominates the Web, but it’s never really cracked the direct response puzzle. That looks like it will change in 2013 with an avalanche of new measurement and targeting tools.

As a marketing platform, Facebook has traditionally thrived at top-of-the-funnel advertising. Unlike search, which hits people just as they express an interest in buying a certain product or service, social media marketing at its best builds relationships, and there’s compelling evidence for its value.

The heavy lifting for this type of advertising, however, happens on the advertisers’ own media—their brand pages. Although Facebook doesn’t charge for brand pages, it can still make money from them by selling ad units that encourage users to become fans, or that amplify the reach of content shared on the page. In a lot of ways, these are straight direct response ads, but with a call-to-action for a “like” or “share” and not a sale.

Showing marketers how many likes or conversations an ad produces is one thing, but proving ultimate sales is another, much more difficult job. Because Facebook advertising traditionally operated high in the funnel, the platform has long suffered from a “last-touch” bias. Click rates and conversions probably underestimate the actual impact of advertising on the Facebook platform, especially for the small display ads that appear to the right of the newsfeed. If people see an ad while they’re checking in on their friends, they may not click. Or they may click on it and do nothing. Later, however, they may decide to go to the website or a store and make a purchase. It’s often this last channel that gets outsized credit for this sale.

Overcoming this last-touch bias has become an imperative for Facebook. First of all, Facebook has developed “sponsored stories,” a native ad format that appears in the newsfeed and refers to how a friend interacted with a brand—becoming a friend, commenting on an article, redeeming an offer, etc. They still pivot off the relationships within Facebook’s social graph but have much higher CTRs and engagement. With these ads, Facebook has a more powerful format, where CTR becomes their ally as opposed to an obstacle.

Facebook is also trying to move down the purchase funnel by giving advertisers the ability to reach people who have already shown interest in a brand. Last year, Facebook introduced two new advertising products that do this. Custom Audience targeting lets advertisers upload their proprietary lists and match them with Facebook users to deliver sponsored stories or standard display ads to their existing customers. Early results show that these custom lists produce higher CTR and lower cost-per-lead. In February, Facebook reached an agreement with big data aggregators Epsilon, Axciom, BlueKai and Datalogix to import even richer audience segments.

Ulitmately, an even more important innovation might be Facebook Exchange, which allows marketers to retarget ads on Facebook. Through cookies and other tracking tools, Facebook can identify which websites users have visited—and even specific products they’ve browsed—and then deliver ads based on this information. Although the exchange is still in its early stages, it too has shown promising results.

Through Custom Audiences and its Exchange, Facebook is digging deeper into the buying process, but its big challenge remains attribution. It needs ways to span the gulf between advertising on the Facebook platform and the ultimate actions it produces. Custom Audiences and the Exchange have shrunk the width of this gulf but haven’t eliminated it—and its advertising team knows it.

That explains why Facebook bought Atlas Solutions from Microsoft right at the end of February. The ad server enhances Facebook’s ability to track online purchases. In announcing the service, Facebook’s Head of Monetization Product Marketing Brian Boland said, “Why we’re doing this is not to launch an ad network, and why we did do this is to improve measurement. We heard loud and clear from advertisers that they want to understand multi-touch attribution instead of just looking at the last click.” With the ad server, Facebook can deliver more types of ads to more publishers and, most importantly, it can effectively follow what users do online. It’s an incredibly powerful tool for online attribution.

It is made even more powerful when paired with Facebook Connect, a plug-in for online publishers that lets visitors log in to a website with their Facebook email and password. The service gives websites a simpler login process and gives them access to a rich layer of biographical information and connections that Facebook has amassed. Facebook, in turn, can see what people are doing all across the Web, not just in their walled community and, importantly, it can track activity across multiple devices, as long as a user has logged into Facebook from that device. If you see an ad on your desktop but convert via your phone or tablet, Facebook can track the activity.

Combining Atlas and Facebook Connect produces a powerful suite of online measurement tools. With a partnership with Datalogix, it can even track activity offline via loyalty cards and email addresses collected at checkout. With these tools, Facebook seems positioned to fully “close the loop” and overcome the last-touch bias. In classic direct marketing fashion, they also let Facebook better optimize who receives advertising. If you know who’s bought your products, you’ve found a great audience for future purchases.

Better measurement tools and advertising formats with higher click-rates transform Facebook into a legitimate direct marketing player. With Facebook experimenting with a slew of new DR formats and tools, including trigger-based Gifts, the social search tool Graph Search, redeemable Offers, and its gift card called—what else—Facebook Card, Facebook seems finally to have embraced it inner direct marketer.

3 Social Media Musts to Grow Your Community

With 2011 holiday sales surpassing expectations, marketers entered 2012 with new customers and a renewed optimism. However, given the ups and downs of the past several years, now isn’t the time to rest on your laurels. 

With 2011 holiday sales surpassing expectations, marketers entered 2012 with new customers and a renewed optimism. However, given the ups and downs of the past several years, now isn’t the time to rest on your laurels. Building community will require a renewed dedication and attention across these three areas:

1. Innovation. Success and differentiation will require proactive planning and a lot of experimentation. Marketers serious about building community must be creative and unafraid of failure. Create an innovation budget is my No. 1 must. Dedicate a portion of your 2012 budget to test new ideas to support new social media programs, networks and technologies.

You’ll no doubt continue to see the emergence of new community players this year (e.g., the increasing influence of Google+ brand pages), as well as the continued expansion and maturity of others, making them viable community platforms. Set aside a portion of your budget to support the building of such platforms as well as the testing of new programs, including but not limited to location-based services, augmented reality efforts, retargeting programs and more.

2. Data analysis and measurement. Data is the holy grail. If you haven’t already integrated your social media communities into your CRM database, 2012 is the year to do so. Looking at behavior such as engagement across multiple channels (e.g., web, email and social) will be essential in indentifying key influencers and brand advocates. Build a social media measurement framework to better track and analyze the impact of your social media efforts on individual programs as well as your brand overall. Measurement frameworks should include the following:

  • awareness: reach and impressions;
  • interest: views;
  • excitement: “Likes,” comments, +1s, @mentions;
  • advocacy: shares, retweets, testimonials, endorsements;
  • conversion: attributable sales; and
  • economic value: upsell success, multiple product ownership, increase in satisfaction/likelihood to recommend, loyalty, multichannel engagement, lifetime value.

3. Splinternet expertise. With more than 37 million iPhones sold over the holidays, smartphones as well as apps have become an increasingly important part of all of our lives. The proliferation of smartphones, new technologies, and proprietary platforms and networks has given rise to what Forrester Research calls “the Splinternet.”

As a result, growing and increasing participation across your social communities via mobile platforms will need to be a key focus in 2012. Marketers and their agencies will increasingly need to hone their communication skills in order to reach and engage consumers. Creating positive user experiences will be paramount and content optimization expertise will become as important as program ideas in 2012 as consumers engage with your brand across platforms.

The key to building community in 2012 will require a bit of left and right brain thinking: A thorough analysis of who your customers are and what they want, mixed with some creative thinking and flawless execution across multiple proprietary plaforms.

Craig Greenfield’s Redefining Performance Marketing: Holding Performance Marketing Campaigns Accountable

Facebook recently passed Google to become the most visited website in the U.S., according to Hitwise. This achievement from the social networking giant reminds marketers not only of the growing importance of social media, and Facebook in particular, but of choosing the right approach and success measurement plan.

Facebook recently passed Google as the most visited website in the U.S., according to Hitwise. This achievement from the social networking giant reminds marketers not only of the growing importance of social media, and Facebook in particular, but of choosing the right approach and success measurement plan.

Performance media offers marketers several solid choices to connect with target audiences, but marketers should clearly define campaign goals up front to ensure they choose the right campaign tactics and success measurement scheme. With concrete goals in place, marketers can consider incorporating fan pages, ads and applications into their campaigns and create plans to observe and measure engagement, conversions, connections and opinions (ECCO) to quantify success.

Facebook pages
Facebook pages offer free, simple ways to update people about promotions, events, new products and more. Marketers should select a memorable Facebook vanity URL for their pages, and promote them on their brands’ native sites, blogs and other promotional materials since consumers need to opt in or click the “Like” button on the page to engage with the brand.

Search engines rank social site pages high for branded searches, and marketers can use them to own more of the search engine results page since search engines only display two results from marketers’ native sites.

Applications
Applications foster viral sharing, encourage brand interaction and generate leads through “tell your friends” and “add to profile” buttons. Papa John’s, for example, uses sweepstakes apps to capture names and email addresses while staying top of mind with consumers. Tools exist to track user interaction with applications.

Social ads
Performance media ads are text- and image-based ads that appear in the right sidebars of Facebook users’ profile pages. Marketers trigger these cost-per-click or cost-per-impression ads based on user attributes like gender, geography, age and interests. These powerful microtargeting capabilities enable marketers to effectively target only the most suitable of Facebook’s more than 400 million users.

ECCO success tracking

A performance marketing campaign’s success hinges on whether, and to what extent, it achieved its goals. ECCO offers a concrete approach to measuring and quantifying success. It can be adapted to a specific campaign’s goals and tactics to establish clearly defined success metrics and milestones, but the approach always incorporates some combination of engagement, conversion, connection and opinion measurement. These terms are explained in more detail in the following list:

  • Engagement. What immediate reaction or interaction was created? Often measures clickthroughs, rollovers, interaction rates, video streams, time spent with ads, games played, etc.
  • Conversions. Following engagement, what actions did the campaign spur? Commonly consists of sales/orders, leads/emails, downloads, sweeps entries and other post-click activity.
  • Connections. How well did the campaign reach its target? What impressions were left? Measures reach, frequency, cross-site duplication, impressions delivered, site visits and more.
  • Opinions. How was the campaign perceived? What reactions were elicited? Can include brand studies, polls/surveys, ad recall, brand awareness, purchase intent, among other things.

Marketers and their partners must assign the right values and indicators to each ECCO element, but the framework provides an adaptable approach that can support a wide range of performance media campaigns and other social media programs. Whether just getting started or devising the next in a long line of effective performance marketing campaigns, marketers can lean on ECCO to hold Facebook campaigns accountable.