Short Video Clips—The Early Report of Our Experience

We’ve launched our short video clip campaign and have some early learning to share with you. You may recall that, a couple of weeks ago, we announced this micro video test, and invited your participation. We’ve learned that just because a micro-social video is short—as little as six seconds—planning is still required if you intend to monetize your efforts. In today’s video, you’ll see our first short video clip. This much we have learned

We’ve launched our short video clip campaign and have some early learning to share with you. You may recall that, a couple of weeks ago, we announced this micro video test, and invited your participation. We’ve learned that just because a micro-social video is short—as little as six seconds—planning is still required if you intend to monetize your efforts. In today’s video, you’ll see our first short video clip. This much we have learned six seconds goes by fast. So we have adapted our approach a bit, and in a slight twist we have lengthened our video test by a few seconds with the addition of an introduction and close.You’ll recall that while Vine by Twitter was the inspiration for the micro-social video, we actually are posting the video on Facebook, YouTube and a web landing page.

The series we’re creating is centered around a “name that tune” interactive contest. We’ve allocated about six seconds to the “tune” but added a few seconds to give context for the viewer with a short voice-over and flying graphics to enhance the experience. You’ll see it in today’s video.

(If the video isn’t just above this line, click here to view it.)

In our last blog on short videos, we told you that the idea behind this series was to involve you, our viewers, in developing this campaign and show you how we did it. We also invited you to share your thoughts via comments and emails (and we listened).

In today’s video, we’ll tell you about three critical steps that had to be completed before we could possibly begin the campaign. It’s the kind of planning that you, too, should undertake. Quite simply, even though these videos are short, there are no short-cuts to quality and no short-cuts when it comes to planning how to monetize a big push like this one.

Over the next few weeks, we have much to learn and share with you. The first video in the series (released last week) had hundreds of video views within 24 hours of going live, and the engagement and comments on Facebook, YouTube and our web landing page have been positive. If you’d like to follow along as it unfolds, you can find out how in today’s video.

In our next blog in a couple of weeks, we’ll tell you about something unexpected, and honestly undesired, that happened to us on Facebook. That experience has prompted a bit of a “work around.” All will be fine, however. We’ll share that experience in our next blog.

We’re pioneering here and don’t have all the answers. But you’re going to learn alongside us if it’s a success—or a bust. There’s still time for you to share your input on the development and deployment of this campaign by commenting below, or sending an email.

Can Micro Social 6-Second Videos Work for Direct Marketers?

Is it really possible to apply direct marketing principles to those new “micro social” 6-second videos? … And expect to monetize it? We’re about to find out, and we’d like to invite you to get on board with the campaign test with your ideas. In turn, we’ll share with you the results and statistics we’ll gather from email blasts, Facebook posts, YouTube views, and ultimately sales performance. You may know about Twitter’s latest foray into “micro social” with 6-second videos on Vine, and

Is it really possible to apply direct marketing principles to those new “micro social” 6-second videos (like Twitter’s Vine)? … And expect to monetize it? We’re about to find out, and we’d like to invite you to get on board with the campaign test with your ideas. In turn, we’ll share with you the results and statistics we’ll gather from email blasts, Facebook posts, YouTube views, and ultimately sales performance. You may know about Twitter’s latest foray into “micro social” with six-second videos on Vine, and if you’re like us, you shake your head and ask, “really? Who would do that and why?” Moreover, is there a way to make money from this?

Our opinions on such wild concepts, however, don’t matter. Results are what drive us as direct marketers. So rather than pour cold water over a new tool, we decided to dive into it to see if we could make it work. We’re about to test the concept and find out if we can make it a success. We’ll report on what’s happening over the next few weeks and in April we’ll have the final results.

(If the video isn’t just above this line, click here to view it.)

This six-second video test starts next week, so it’s early in the campaign with time to adapt and adjust. And that’s where your ideas can come in. The campaign extends into early April, allowing plenty of time to adjust it along the way.

But there is a twist: because the organization we’re testing this concept for doesn’t have a large Twitter following, we figured, heck, why not create short video blasts that can reside on YouTube, Facebook, and a web landing page (where we already have a large audience), and see what happens.

We invite your participation in formulating this test by answering a few questions (along with other questions and suggestions you think of) in the comments section below. Here’s how you can participate:

  • If you were in charge of marketing this 6-second series of videos, what would you do?
  • What would you put on the screen of these 6-second videos? What about other production ideas?
  • What would you do to expand the reach beyond the organization’s email list and Facebook presence?
  • Would you use YouTube annotations?
  • Would you use Facebook promoted posts? Or Facebook pay-per-click ads?
  • What other social media options would you try to expand the reach?
  • For every 100 fans, what would you project engagement levels to be?
  • What percentage sales increase over last year’s performance would you expect for this campaign to be considered a success?
  • What other key performance indicators, or KPI’s, would you use to evaluate the sales results of this campaign?

Please share your ideas in the comments section below, or email me directly. We’ll keep you updated in our future blog posts, and we’ll find out together if all of this worked. If it’s a bust, we’ll tell you that, too.

With so much new coming into our marketing world, the more we share successes and failures with each other, the more effective and profitable we’ll all be.